Publications

Export 7 results:
Sort by: Author [ Title  (Asc)] Type Year
[A] B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
A
Day, JMD, Hilton DR, Pearson DG, Macpherson CG, Kjarsgaard BA, Janney PE.  2005.  Absence of a high time-integrated He-3/(U+Th) source in the mantle beneath continents. Geology. 33:733-736.   10.1130/g21625.1   AbstractWebsite

Volcanic rocks from ocean island and continental flood basalt provinces can exhibit He-3/He-4 ratios greatly in excess of those of mid-oceanic-ridge basalts (MORB). High He-3/He-4 ratios must indicate derivation from a mantle source with high time-integrated He-3/(U+Th) relative to depleted MORB-source mantle. The location of the high He-3/He-4 mantle reservoir is a poorly resolved but important issue because of the constraints it places upon the structure and convective style of Earth's mantle. It has been proposed that the high He-3/He-4 reservoir resides in the upper mantle, rather than the lower mantle, because Earth should be volatile poor and highly differentiated, with incompatible elements (such as He) concentrated in the upper mantle and crust. This hypothesis can be tested using continental intraplate alkaline volcanics (CIAV) that are generated at or near the boundary between the conducting lithospheric and convecting asthenospheric mantle. Olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts from Cretaceous to Miocene CIAV from Canada, South Africa, and Uganda have He-3/He-4 ratios more radiogenic than MORB, strongly arguing against a widespread high He-3/He-4 source in the continental lithosphere or the underlying convecting upper mantle. Combined with a global data set of CIAV and continental lithosphere mantle xenoliths, these results provide no evidence for high He-3/He-4 in any samples known to originate from this environment. Therefore, volcanic rocks with He-3/He-4 greater than MORB He-3/He-4 are likely to sample a mantle source with high time-integrated He-3/(U+Th) that cannot exist within or below the continents. This reservoir is also unlikely to exist within the upper mantle as defined by the He-3/He-4 distribution in MORB.

Day, JMD, O'Driscoll B.  2019.  Ancient high Pt/Os crustal contaminants can explain radiogenic 186Os in intraplate magmas. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 519:101-108.   https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2019.04.039   Abstract

The origin of variations in 186Os/188Os ratios amongst mantle-derived basaltic and komatiitic lavas remains controversial, with opposing models arguing for deep core-mantle versus shallow mantle sources. Crustal contamination has generally not been favoured due to the low Os contents of such sources, meaning that variations in 186Os/188Os would require involvement of extremely high proportions of crustal material. Here we re-examine crustal contamination as an effective means for generating significant 186Os/188Os variations in Earth materials. Using chromitites and peridotites from the Stillwater, Muskox and Rum layered intrusions, we show that radiogenic 186Os/188Os ratios are correlated with 187Os/188Os ratios and can only be explained by shallow-level mixing processes and crustal contamination. The samples have 186Os ([{(186Os/188Ossample[t]/186Os/188OsPM(t)) -1} × 1000], where the modern primitive mantle [PM] 186Os/188Os is 0.1198388) values ranging between 0.04 to 0.15 for the ~2.7 Ga Stillwater Igneous Complex, -0.05 to 0.17 for the ~1.27 Ga Muskox Intrusion, and 0.02 to 0.13 for the ~0.06 Ga Rum Layered Suite. The highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) contents of the chromitites and peridotites can be modelled through high sulfide-melt partitioning (typically >8000) and emphasise the role of S-saturation and HSE scavenging. Considering the high sulfide-melt partitioning and accounting for high silicate melt to sulfide melt ratios (R-factor), it is possible to explain the variations in 186Os-187Os in layered intrusions using calculated Os isotope crustal evolution growth models. These calculations indicate that <4% of ancient high Pt/Os crustal contributions can explain the composition of the chromitites and peridotites that were examined. Our observations are consistent with published models for chromitite genesis that invoke either crustal melt-primitive melt mixing, or cumulate assimilation. A crustal origin for radiogenic 186Os is a possible cause for 186Os/188Os ratio variations observed in some komatiites. It is more difficult to explain radiogenic 186Os/188Os measured in Hawaiian lavas by crustal contamination processes. Instead, ancient high Pt/Os oceanic crust, shallow mantle sources such as metasomatic sulfide, or metal-rich large low-shear wave velocity provinces at the core-mantle boundary, all remain valid explanations.

Cabral, RA, Jackson MG, Rose-Koga EF, Koga KT, Whitehouse MJ, Antonelli MA, Farquhar J, Day JMD, Hauri EH.  2013.  Anomalous sulphur isotopes in plume lavas reveal deep mantle storage of Archaean crust. Nature. 496:490-+.   10.1038/nature12020   AbstractWebsite

Basaltic lavas erupted at some oceanic intraplate hotspot volcanoes are thought to sample ancient subducted crustal materials(1,2). However, the residence time of these subducted materials in the mantle is uncertain and model-dependent(3), and compelling evidence for their return to the surface in regions of mantle upwelling beneath hotspots is lacking. Here we report anomalous sulphur isotope signatures indicating mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in olivine-hosted sulphides from 20-million-year-old ocean island basalts from Mangaia, Cook Islands (Polynesia), which have been suggested to sample recycled oceanic crust(3,4). Terrestrial MIF sulphur isotope signatures (in which the amount of fractionation does not scale in proportion with the difference in the masses of the isotopes) were generated exclusively through atmospheric photochemical reactions until about 2.45 billion years ago(5-7). Therefore, the discovery of MIF sulphur in these young plume lavas suggests that sulphur-probably derived from hydrothermally altered oceanic crust-was subducted into the mantle before 2.45 billion years ago and recycled into the mantle source of Mangaia lavas. These new data provide evidence for ancient materials, with negative Delta S-33 values, in the mantle source for Mangaia lavas. Our data also complement evidence for recycling of the sulphur content of ancient sedimentary materials to the subcontinental lithospheric mantle that has been identified in diamond-hosted sulphide inclusions(8,9). This Archaean age for recycled oceanic crust also provides key constraints on the length of time that subducted crustal material can survive in the mantle, and on the timescales of mantle convection from subduction to upwelling beneath hotspots.

Lowder, KB, Allen MC, Day JMD, Deheyn DD, Taylor JRA.  2017.  Assessment of ocean acidification and warming on the growth, calcification, and biophotonics of a California grass shrimp. ICES Journal of Marine Science.   doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsw246   Abstract

Cryptic colouration in crustaceans, important for both camouflage and visual communication, is achieved through physiological and morphological mechanisms that are sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Consequently, ocean warming and ocean acidification can affect crustaceans’ biophotonic appearance and exoskeleton composition in ways that might disrupt colouration and transparency. In the present study, we measured growth, mineralization, transparency, and spectral reflectance (colouration) of the caridean grass shrimp Hippolyte californiensis in response to pH and temperature stressors. Shrimp were exposed to ambient pH and temperature (pH 8.0, 17 °C), decreased pH (pH 7.5, 17 °C), and decreased pH/increased temperature (pH 7.5, 19 °C) conditions for 7 weeks. There were no differences in either Mg or Ca content in the exoskeleton across treatments nor in the transparency and spectral reflectance. There was a small but significant increase in percent growth in the carapace length of shrimp exposed to decreased pH/increased temperature. Overall, these findings suggest that growth, calcification, and colour of H. californiensis are unaffected by decreases of 0.5 pH units. This tolerance might stem from adaptation to the highly variable pH environment that these grass shrimp inhabit, highlighting the multifarious responses to ocean acidification, within the Crustacea.

Peters, BJ, Day JMD.  2014.  Assessment of relative Ti, Ta, and Nb (TITAN) enrichments in ocean island basalts. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. 15(11):4424-4444.   10.1002/2014GC005506   Abstract

The sensitivity of trace element concentrations to processes governing solid-melt interactions has made them valuable tools for tracing the effects of partial melting, fractional crystallization, metasomatism, and similar processes on the composition of a parental melt. Recent studies of ocean island basalts (OIB) have sought to correlate Ti, Ta, and Nb (TITAN) anomalies to isotopic tracers, such as 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os ratios, which may trace primordial deep mantle sources. A new compilation of global OIB trace element abundance data indicates that positive TITAN anomalies, though statistically pervasive features of OIB, may not be compositional features of their mantle sources. OIB show a range of Ti (Ti/Ti* = 0.28–2.35), Ta (Ta/Ta* = 0.11–93.4), and Nb (Nb/Nb* = 0.13–17.8) anomalies that show negligible correlations with 3He/4He ratios, indicating that TITAN anomalies are not derived from the less-degassed mantle source traced by high-3He/4He. Positive TITAN anomalies can be modeled using variable degrees (0.1–10%) of nonmodal batch partial melting of garnet-spinel lherzolite at temperatures and pressures considered typical for OIB petrogenesis, and subjecting this partial melt to fractional crystallization and assimilation of mid-ocean ridge basalt-like crust (AFC). Correlations of TITAN anomalies with modal abundances of olivine and clinopyroxene in porphyritic Canary Islands lavas provide empirical support for this process and indicate that high abundances of these phases in OIB may create misleading trace element anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized spider diagrams. Because partial melting and AFC are common to all mantle-derived magmas, caution should be used when attributing TITAN anomalies to direct sampling of recycled or deep mantle sources by hotspots.

Day, JMD, Ash RD, Liu Y, Bellucci JJ, Rumble D, McDonough WF, Walker RJ, Taylor LA.  2009.  Asteroids and andesites. Nature. 459:E2.   doi:10.1038/nature08078   Abstract

Arculus et al.1 raise an important question regarding the use of terrestrial rock nomenclature to characterize extraterrestrial materials. Here the issue relates to the definition of ‘andesite’, and whether the felsic achondrite meteorites GRA 06128 and GRA 06129 (GRA 06128/9) can and should be classified using this term2. More broadly, the question is whether extraterrestrial rocks should be classified using standard petrologic and geochemical criteria, such as mineralogy and major-element bulk composition, developed for the description of terrestrial rocks3,4. The approach of Arculus et al.1 is that petrogenetic process is of equal or greater importance when classifying a rock. This question must ultimately be decided by the scientific community.

Pernet-Fisher, JF, Day JMD, Howarth GH, Ryabov VV, Taylor LA.  2017.  Atmospheric outgassing and native-iron formation during carbonaceous sediment–basalt melt interactions. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 460:201-212.   http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2016.12.022   Abstract

Organic carbon-rich sediment assimilation by basaltic magmas leads to enhanced emission of greenhouse gases during continental flood basalt eruptions. A collateral effect of these interactions is the generation of low oxygen fugacities (fO2)(below the iron-wüstite [IW] buffer curve) during magmatic crystallization, resulting in the precipitation of native-iron. The occurrence of native-iron bearing terrestrial basaltic rocks are rare, having been identified at three locations: Siberia, West Greenland, and Central Germany. We report the first combined study of Re–Os isotopes, highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re), and trace-element abundances for these three occurrences, in addition to host sediments at West Greenland. To quantify the amount of crustal assimilation experienced by the magmas, we present combined crystallization and assimilation models, together with fractional crystallization models, to assess how relative abundances of the HSE have been modified during crystallization. The radiogenic osmium isotopic compositions (γOsinitial +15 to +193) of mafic igneous samples are consistent with assimilation of old high Re/Os crustal contaminants with radiogenic 187Os/188Os, whereas the HSE inter-element fractionations (Pd/Os 2 to >10,000) suggest that some Siberian samples underwent an early stage of sulfide removal.

Metalliferous samples from the Siberian intrusions of Khungtukun and Dzhaltul (associated with the Siberian flood basalts) yield internal 187Re–187Os ages of 266 ±83 Ma and 249 ±50 Ma, respectively, reflecting late-Permian emplacement ages. These results imply that crustal assimilation took place prior to crystallization of native-Fe. In contrast, metalliferous samples from Disko Island and Bühl (associated with the West Greenland flood basalts, and the Central European Volcanic Province, respectively) have trends in 187Re/188Os–187Os/188Os space corresponding to apparent ages older than their reported crystallization ages. These anomalous ages probably reflect concurrent assimilation of high Re/Os, radiogenic 187Os crust during crystallization of native-Fe, consistent with the character of local West Greenland sediments. In all three locations, calculations of combined assimilation of crustal sediments and fractional crystallization indicate between 1–7% assimilation can account for the Os-isotope systematics. In the case of Siberian samples, incompatible trace-element abundances indicate that lower crustal assimilation may have also occurred, consistent with the suggestion that crustal assimilation took place prior to native-Fe precipitation. The extent of local crustal contamination at Siberia, West Greenland, and Bühl necessitates that significant quantities of CH4, CO, CO2, SO2and H2O were released during assimilation of carbonaceous sediments. Consequently, carbonaceous sediment–basalt melt interactions have collateral effects on total gas output from flood basalt volcanism into the atmosphere. However, the amount of carbonaceous sediment contamination experienced by melts forming the Khungtukun and Dzhaltul intrusions alone, cannot explain the major C-isotope excursions at the Permo–Triassic mass-extinction event. Instead, further unsampled intrusions that also experienced significant carbonaceous sediment–melt interactions would be required. Enhanced greenhouse gas-emission during the Permo–Triassic mass extinction may have been facilitated by a combination of mantle melting and carbonaceous sediment–melt interactions, together with other proposed mechanisms, including wildfires, or by microbial metabolic exhalation.