Publications

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2016
Wang, KN, Garrison JL, Acikoz U, Haase JS, Murphy BJ, Muradyan P, Lulich T.  2016.  Open-loop tracking of rising and setting GPS radio-occultation signals from an airborne platform: Signal model and error analysis. Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 54:3967-3984.   10.1109/tgrs.2016.2532346   AbstractWebsite

Global Positioning System (GPS) radio-occultation (RO) is an atmospheric sounding technique utilizing the received GPS signal through the stratified atmosphere to measure refractivity, which provides information on temperature and humidity. The GPS-RO technique is now operational on several Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites, which cannot provide high temporal and spatial resolution soundings necessary to observe localized transient events, such as tropical storms. An airborne RO (ARO) system has thus been developed for localized GPS-RO campaigns. RO signals in the lower troposphere are adversely affected by rapid phase accelerations and severe signal power fading. These signal dynamics often cause the phase-locked loop in conventional GPS survey receivers to lose lock in the lower troposphere, and the open-loop (OL) tracking in postprocessing is used to overcome this problem. OL tracking also allows robust processing of rising GPS signals, approximately doubling the number of observed occultations. An approach for "backward" OL tracking was developed, in which the correlations are computed sequentially in reverse time so that the signal can be acquired and tracked at high elevations for rising occultations. Ultimately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limits the depth of tracking in the atmosphere. We have developed a model relating the SNR to the variance in the residual phase of the observed signal produced from OL tracking. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of the phase variance model to airborne data. We then apply this model to set a threshold on refractivity retrieval based upon the cumulative unwrapping error bias to determine the altitude limit for reliable signal tracking. We also show consistency between the ARO SNR and collocated COSMIC satellite observations and use these results to evaluate the antenna requirements for an improved ARO system.

2008
Xie, FQ, Haase JS, Syndergaard S.  2008.  Profiling the Atmosphere Using the Airborne GPS Radio Occultation Technique: A Sensitivity Study. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 46:3424-3435.   <u>10.1109/tgrs.2008.2004713</u>   AbstractWebsite

Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) sounding, with its high vertical resolution temperature and humidity profiling capability, is revolutionizing atmospheric science, particularly through assimilation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Currently, the observations are derived from GPS receivers onboard low Earth orbiting satellites. However, with the current number of satellites, it is difficult to provide dense sounding measurements in a specific region within a limited time period. With a GPS receiver onboard an airplane, the GPS RO technique offers such an opportunity while retaining the high vertical resolution sounding capability. The GNSS Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing is currently under development for the National Science Foundation's High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) aircraft. This paper presents a sensitivity analysis of the airborne occultation technique that will be used for the HIAPER system. The results demonstrate an anticipated overall accuracy of better than 0.5% for the retrieved refractivity from the surface to about 1 km below the airplane, where the expected airplane velocity errors of up to 5 mm/s limit the accuracy. The effects on the retrievals due to horizontal variations in atmospheric refractivity are significant, and retrieval errors may reach several percent inside frontal systems when the front is perpendicular to the ray paths and within 200 km of the tangent point. In general, the airborne GPS RO system provides a promising new data source for NWP and targeted observational studies.

2002
Ge, MR, Calais E, Haase J.  2002.  Sensitivity of zenith total delay accuracy to GPS orbit errors and implications for near-real-time GPS meteorology. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 107   431510.1029/2001jd001095   AbstractWebsite

[1] Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements have been demonstrated to provide precipitable water vapor (PWV) estimates with a level of accuracy that is comparable to that of radiosondes and microwave radiometers. GPS measurements therefore have the potential to become a significant source of data for operational weather forecasting, provided that PWV (or the intermediate zenith total delay (ZTD)) can be made available in near real-time with a minimum accuracy degradation. Despite the recent decrease in the latency and increase in accuracy provided by the International GPS Service (IGS) ultrarapid predicted GPS orbit products, we show that the accuracy of these orbits continues to be a limiting factor for the accuracy of near real-time GPS-derived atmospheric estimates. In this work, a coefficient matrix is derived from the normal equations of the least squares adjustment model for the GPS observables that maps the orbital parameter errors into ZTD errors. This is used to analyze the sensitivity of GPS derived tropospheric errors to an extensive set of parameters, including their time dependence, in a computationally efficient manner. We show that ZTD errors are dominated by biases in the orbital semimajor axis, with minor contributions from the inclination and argument of perigee, and that this error increases significantly after the fourth to fifth hour of the prediction window. We implemented a GPS data processing strategy based on an iterative estimation of the three most critical orbital parameters (semimajor axis, inclination and argument of perigee) together with the ZTD parameters. We tested this strategy in a 3500 3500 km network of 15 GPS sites in western Europe providing hourly data files. We show that the standard deviation improvement compared to a strategy based only on the orbit quality index provided with the predicted orbit products is on the order of 20%. The analysis of one month of data in near-real-time shows a bias lower than 1 mm ZTD and a standard deviation lower than 6 mm ZTD compared to using the most precise IGS final orbits. We also show that this strategy is robust and capable of dealing with very large orbit errors appropriately. We demonstrate that the same quality is achievable with a 1500 1500 km network which has positive implications for decentralized processing strategies. The near real-time processing methodology described here meets the current timeliness requirements of operational meteorology (30 mn to 2 hours, depending on the application), while ensuring a level of accuracy similar to that provided in postprocessed mode with precise final IGS orbits (1 mm ZTD bias, 6 mm ZTD RMS). The method we propose can also be considered as an "on-the-fly'' orbit quality control for near real-time GPS applications.