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2016
Saunders, JK, Goldberg DE, Haase JS, Bock Y, Offield DG, Melgar D, Restrepo J, Fleischman RB, Nema A, Geng JH, Walls C, Mann D, Mattioli GS.  2016.  Seismogeodesy using GPS and low-cost MEMS accelerometers: Perspectives for earthquake early warning and rapid response. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 106:2469-2489.   10.1785/0120160062   AbstractWebsite

The seismogeodetic method computes accurate displacement and velocity waveforms by optimally extracting high-frequency information from strong-motion accelerometers and low-frequency information from collocated Global Positioning System (GPS) instruments. These broadband observations retain the permanent (static) displacement, are immune to clipping and magnitude saturation for large earthquakes, and are sensitive enough to record P-wave arrivals. These characteristics make seismogeodesy suitable for real-time applications such as earthquake early warning. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) has developed an inexpensive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer package to upgrade established GPS stations. We compare the performance of our MEMS accelerometer with an observatory-grade accelerometer using an experiment at the University of California San Diego Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table. We show that the two types of accelerometers agree in frequency ranges of seismological and engineering interest and produce equivalent seismogeodetic estimates of displacement and velocity. To date, 27 SIO MEMS packages have been installed at GPS monitoring stations in southern California and the San Francisco Bay area and have recorded four earthquakes (M4.2, M4.1, and two of M4.0). The P-wave arrivals are distinguishable in the seismogeodetic observations at distances of up to similar to 25 km away but not in the GPS-only displacements. There is no significant permanent deformation for these small events. This study demonstrates the lower limit of detectability and that seismogeodetic waveforms can also be a reliable early confirmation that an event is not large or hazardous. It also raises the possibility of rapid magnitude estimation through scaling relationships.

2013
Geng, JH, Bock Y, Melgar D, Crowell BW, Haase JS.  2013.  A new seismogeodetic approach applied to GPS and accelerometer observations of the 2012 Brawley seismic swarm: Implications for earthquake early warning. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 14:2124-2142.   10.1002/ggge.20144   AbstractWebsite

The 26 August 2012 Brawley seismic swarm of hundreds of events ranging from M1.4 to M5.5 in the Salton Trough, California provides a unique data set to investigate a new seismogeodetic approach that combines Global Positioning System (GPS) and accelerometer observations to estimate displacement and velocity waveforms. First in simulated real-time mode, we analyzed 1-5 Hz GPS data collected by 17 stations fully encircling the swarm zone at near-source distances up to about 40km using precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR). We used a reference network of North American GPS stations well outside the region of deformation to estimate fractional-cycle biases and satellite clock parameters, which were then combined with ultrarapid orbits from the International GNSS Service to estimate positions during the Brawley seismic swarm. Next, we estimated seismogeodetic displacements and velocities from GPS phase and pseudorange observations and 100-200 Hz accelerations collected at three pairs of GPS and seismic stations in close proximity using a new tightly coupled Kalman filter approach as an extension of the PPP-AR process. We can clearly discern body waves in the velocity waveforms, including P-wave arrivals not detectable with the GPS-only approach for earthquake magnitudes as low as M-w 4.6 and significant static offsets for magnitudes as low as M-w 5.4. Our study shows that GPS networks upgraded with strong motion accelerometers can provide new information for improved understanding of the earthquake rupture process and be of critical value in creating a robust early warning system for any earthquake of societal significance.

Symithe, SJ, Calais E, Haase JS, Freed AM, Douilly R.  2013.  Coseismic slip distribution of the 2010 m 7.0 Haiti earthquake and resulting stress changes on regional faults. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 103:2326-2343.   10.1785/0120120306   AbstractWebsite

The 12 January 2010 M-w 7.0 Haiti earthquake ruptured the previously unmapped Leogane fault, a secondary transpressional structure located close to the Enriquillo fault, the major fault system assumed to be the primary source of seismic hazard for southern Haiti. In the absence of a precise aftershock catalog, previous estimations of coseismic slip had to infer the rupture geometry from geodetic and/or seismological data. Here we use a catalog of precisely relocated aftershocks beginning one month after the event and covering the following 5 months to constrain the rupture geometry, estimate a slip distribution from an inversion of Global Positional Systems (GPS), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and coastal uplift data, and calculate the resulting changes of Coulomb failure stress on neighboring faults. The relocated aftershocks confirm a north-dipping structure consistent with the Leogane fault, as inferred from previous slip inversions, but with two subfaults, each corresponding to a major slip patch. The rupture increased Coulomb stresses on the shallow Enriquillo fault parallel to the Leogane rupture surface and to the west (Miragoane area) and east (Port-au-Prince). Results show that the cluster of reverse faulting earthquakes observed further to the west, coincident with the offshore Trois Baies fault, are triggered by an increase in Coulomb stress. Other major regional faults did not experience a significant change in stress. The increase of stress on faults such as the Enriquillo are a concern, as this could advance the timing of future events on this fault, still capable of magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes.

Douilly, R, Haase JS, Ellsworth WL, Bouin MP, Calais E, Symithe SJ, Armbruster JG, de Lepinay BM, Deschamps A, Mildor SL, Meremonte ME, Hough SE.  2013.  Crustal structure and fault geometry of the 2010 Haiti earthquake from temporary seismometer deployments. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 103:2305-2325.   10.1785/0120120303   AbstractWebsite

Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent 12 January 2010 M-w 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M 7 or larger earthquakes. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data, however, showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Leogane fault, a north-dipping oblique transpressional fault located immediately north of the EPGF. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean-bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, determine a 1D regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined dataset clearly delineate the Leogane fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agree with the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock but with a steeper dip than inferred from previous finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first-motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

Crowell, BW, Melgar D, Bock Y, Haase JS, Geng JH.  2013.  Earthquake magnitude scaling using seismogeodetic data. Geophysical Research Letters. 40:6089-6094.   10.1002/2013gl058391   AbstractWebsite

The combination of GPS and strong-motion data to estimate seismogeodetic waveforms creates a data set that is sensitive to the entire spectrum of ground displacement and the full extent of coseismic slip. In this study we derive earthquake magnitude scaling relationships using seismogeodetic observations of either P wave amplitude or peak ground displacements from five earthquakes in Japan and California ranging in magnitude from 5.3 to 9.0. The addition of the low-frequency component allows rapid distinction of earthquake size for large magnitude events with high precision, unlike accelerometer data that saturate for earthquakes greater than M 7 to 8, and is available well before the coseismic displacements are emplaced. These results, though based on a limited seismogeodetic data set, support earlier studies that propose it may be possible to estimate the final magnitude of an earthquake well before the rupture is complete.

2007
Emore, GL, Haase JS, Choi K, Larson KA, Yamagiwa A.  2007.  Recovering seismic displacements through combined use of 1-Hz GPS and strong-motion accelerometers. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 97:357-378.   10.1785/0120060153   AbstractWebsite

Retrieving displacement from seismic acceleration records is often difficult because unknown small baseline offsets in the acceleration time series will contaminate the doubly integrated record with large quadratic errors. One-hertz Global Positioning System (GPS) position estimates and collocated seismic data are available from the 2003 M-W 8 Tokachi-Oki (Hokkaido) earthquake. After a process of correcting for possible misorientation of the seismic sensors, an inversion method is used to simultaneously solve for ground displacement with both data sets as input constraints. This inversion method takes into account the presence of unknown offsets in the acceleration record, and the relatively large uncertainties in the estimated 1-Hz GPS positions. In this study, 117 channels of seismic data were analyzed. Only 5% of the time does the static displacement retrieved from traditional baseline correction processing without GPS information agree with the absolute displacement measured with 1-Hz GPS to within the errors of the GPS data. In solving simultaneously for constrained displacements that agree with both the seismic and GPS data sets, an optimal solution was found that included only one- or two-step functions in the acceleration records. Potential explanations for the offsets are analyzed in terms of tilt of the sensor or electronic noise. For nine stations, clear misorientations of the seismic sensors of more than 20 deg from the reported orientation were found. For this size event, the 30-sec sampled GPS solutions were also a sufficient constraint for establishing the offset errors and recovering reliable displacements. The results significantly extend the frequency band over which accelerometer data are reliable for source inversion studies.

2004
Miyazaki, S, Larson KM, Choi KH, Hikima K, Koketsu K, Bodin P, Haase J, Emore G, Yamagiwa A.  2004.  Modeling the rupture process of the 2003 September 25 Tokachi-Oki (Hokkaido) earthquake using 1-Hz GPS data. Geophysical Research Letters. 31   L2160310.1029/2004gl021457   AbstractWebsite

[ 1] High-rate GPS has the potential to recover both dynamic and static displacements accurately. We analyze 1-Hz GPS data recorded during the 2003 Tokachi-Oki earthquake. The 1-Hz GPS displacement waveforms show good agreement with integrated accelerometer records except for low frequency noise that are inherently present in integrated seismic records. The GPS waveforms were inverted to model the spatio-temporal evolution of the fault slip during the rupture. The slip is found to propagate downdip in the subduction zone with largest moment release -50 km northwest of the hypocenter. The region of largest slip agrees in general with traditional seismic studies, indicating that 1-Hz GPS can be used for finite fault studies. The 1-Hz GPS slip model shows clearer contrast with afterslip distributions than those inferred from strong motion data, possibly because 1-Hz GPS is more sensitive to cumulative slip distribution.

1996
Haase, JS, Hauksson E, Vernon F, Edelman A.  1996.  Modeling of ground motion from a 1994 Northridge aftershock using a tomographic velocity model of the Los Angeles Basin. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 86:S156-S167. AbstractWebsite

The 1994 Northridge mainshock and its aftershocks show a complex pattern of peak accelerations at stations located in the Los Angeles Basin. The waveforms contain multiples of body-wave phases and extensive surface waves at frequencies mostly below 1 Hz. In particular, for stations at distances greater than 18 km, secondary arrivals show larger accelerations than the direct S-wave arrivals. The mainshock waveforms are further complicated by irregularities of the source rupture. We use 2D finite difference to evaluate the effect of lateral variations in seismic velocity on the amplitude of shear-wave energy and to distinguish the effects of source and propagation path. We model waveforms from one aftershock recorded at nine stations deployed along a 60-km-long profile extending into the Los Angeles Basin. We use a two-dimensional slice through the 3D tomography model of the Los Angeles Basin in the 2D finite-difference calculations. These synthetic waveforms fit the aftershock waveforms significantly better than corresponding waveforms determined from simple 1D velocity models. With the addition of a thin low-velocity surface layer above the tomography model, the finite-difference synthetics reproduce most of the important features of the recorded data, in particular, the large-amplitude arrivals 7 to 10 sec following the direct S arrival. These arrivals correspond to the SS arrival, which is sharply refracted at the basin edge, and the S-wave with multiple legs trapped by the dipping near surface gradient. For large earthquakes located either inside or outside the basin, these phases can be the cause of the largest and hence potentially most hazardous shaking in the Los Angeles Basin.