Publications

Export 62 results:
Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year  (Desc)]
2017
Wang, KN, Garrison JL, Haase JS, Murphy BJ.  2017.  Improvements to GPS Airborne Radio Occultation in the Lower Troposphere Through Implementation of the Phase Matching Method. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 122:10215-10230.   10.1002/2017jd026568   AbstractWebsite

Airborne radio occultation (ARO) is a remote sensing technique for atmospheric sounding using Global Positioning System signals received by an airborne instrument. The atmospheric refractivity profile, which depends on pressure, temperature, and water vapor, can be retrieved by measuring the signal delay due to the refractive medium through which the signal traverses. The ARO system was developed to make repeated observations within an individual meteorological event such as a tropical storm, regardless of the presence of clouds and precipitation, and complements existing observation techniques such as dropsondes and satellite remote sensing. RO systems can suffer multipath ray propagation in the lower troposphere if there are strong refractivity gradients, for example, due to a highly variable moisture distribution or a sharp boundary layer, interfering with continuous carrier phase tracking as well as complicating retrievals. The phase matching method has now been adapted for ARO and is shown to reduce negative biases in the refractivity retrieval by providing robust retrievals of bending angle in the presence of multipath. The retrieval results are presented for a flight campaign in September 2010 for Hurricane Karl in the Caribbean Sea. The accuracy is assessed through comparison with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Interim Reanalysis. The fractional difference in refractivity can be maintained at a standard deviation of 2% from flight level down to a height of 2km. The phase matching method decreases the negative refractivity bias by as much as 4% over the classical geometrical optics retrieval method.

Zhang, WX, Lou YD, Haase JS, Zhang R, Zheng G, Huang JF, Shi C, Liu JN.  2017.  The Use of Ground-Based GPS Precipitable Water Measurements over China to Assess Radiosonde and ERA-Interim Moisture Trends and Errors from 1999 to 2015. Journal of Climate. 30:7643-7667.   10.1175/jcli-d-16-0591.1   AbstractWebsite

Global positioning system (GPS) data from over 260 ground-based permanent stations in China covering the period from 1 March 1999 to 30 April 2015 were used to estimate precipitable water (PW) above each site with an accuracy of about 0.75 mm. Four types of radiosondes (referred to as GZZ2, GTS1, GTS1-1, and GTS1-2) were used in China during this period. Instrumentation type changes in radiosonde records were identified by comparing PW calculated from GPS and radiosonde data. Systematic errors in different radiosonde types introduced significant biases to the estimated PW trends at stations where more than one radiosonde type was used. Estimating PW trends from reanalysis products (ERA-Interim), which assimilate the unadjusted radiosonde humidity data, resulted in an artificial downward PW trend at almost all stations in China. The statistically significant GPS PW trends are predominantly positive, consistent in sign with the increase in moisture expected from the Clausius-Clapeyron relation due to a global temperature increase. The standard deviations of the differences between ERA-Interim and GPS PW in the summer were 3 times larger than the observational error of GPS PW, suggesting that potentially significant improvements to the reanalysis could be achieved by assimilating denser GPS PW observations over China. This work, based on an entirely independent GPS PW dataset, confirms previously reported significant differences in radiosonde PW trends when using corrected data. Furthermore, the dense geographical coverage of the all-weather GPS PW observations, especially in remote areas in western China, provides a valuable resource for calibrating regional trends in reanalysis products.

2016
Saunders, JK, Goldberg DE, Haase JS, Bock Y, Offield DG, Melgar D, Restrepo J, Fleischman RB, Nema A, Geng JH, Walls C, Mann D, Mattioli GS.  2016.  Seismogeodesy using GPS and low-cost MEMS accelerometers: Perspectives for earthquake early warning and rapid response. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 106:2469-2489.   10.1785/0120160062   AbstractWebsite

The seismogeodetic method computes accurate displacement and velocity waveforms by optimally extracting high-frequency information from strong-motion accelerometers and low-frequency information from collocated Global Positioning System (GPS) instruments. These broadband observations retain the permanent (static) displacement, are immune to clipping and magnitude saturation for large earthquakes, and are sensitive enough to record P-wave arrivals. These characteristics make seismogeodesy suitable for real-time applications such as earthquake early warning. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) has developed an inexpensive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer package to upgrade established GPS stations. We compare the performance of our MEMS accelerometer with an observatory-grade accelerometer using an experiment at the University of California San Diego Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table. We show that the two types of accelerometers agree in frequency ranges of seismological and engineering interest and produce equivalent seismogeodetic estimates of displacement and velocity. To date, 27 SIO MEMS packages have been installed at GPS monitoring stations in southern California and the San Francisco Bay area and have recorded four earthquakes (M4.2, M4.1, and two of M4.0). The P-wave arrivals are distinguishable in the seismogeodetic observations at distances of up to similar to 25 km away but not in the GPS-only displacements. There is no significant permanent deformation for these small events. This study demonstrates the lower limit of detectability and that seismogeodetic waveforms can also be a reliable early confirmation that an event is not large or hazardous. It also raises the possibility of rapid magnitude estimation through scaling relationships.

Adhikari, L, Xie FQ, Haase JS.  2016.  Application of the full spectrum inversion algorithm to simulated airborne GPS radio occultation signals. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques. 9:5077-5087.   10.5194/amt-9-5077-2016   AbstractWebsite

With a GPS receiver on board an airplane, the airborne radio occultation (ARO) technique provides dense lower-tropospheric soundings over target regions. Large variations in water vapor in the troposphere cause strong signal multipath, which could lead to systematic errors in RO retrievals with the geometric optics (GO) method. The space-borne GPS RO community has successfully developed the full-spectrum inversion (FSI) technique to solve the multipath problem. This paper is the first to adapt the FSI technique to retrieve atmospheric properties (bending and refractivity) from ARO signals, where it is necessary to compensate for the receiver traveling on a non-circular trajectory inside the atmosphere, and its use is demonstrated using an end-to-end simulation system. The forward-simulated GPS L1 (1575.42 MHz) signal amplitude and phase are used to test the modified FSI algorithm. The ARO FSI method is capable of reconstructing the fine vertical structure of the moist lower troposphere in the presence of severe multipath, which otherwise leads to large retrieval errors in the GO retrieval. The sensitivity of the modified FSI-retrieved bending angle and refractivity to errors in signal amplitude and errors in the measured refractivity at the receiver is presented. Accurate bending angle retrievals can be obtained from the surface up to similar to 250m below the receiver at typical flight altitudes above the tropopause, above which the retrieved bending angle becomes highly sensitive to the phase measurement noise. Abrupt changes in the signal amplitude that are a challenge for receiver tracking and geometric optics bending angle retrieval techniques do not produce any systematic bias in the FSI retrievals when the SNR is high. For very low SNR, the FSI performs as expected from theoretical considerations. The 1% in situ refractivity measurement errors at the receiver height can introduce a maximum refractivity retrieval error of 0.5% (1 K) near the receiver, but the error decreases gradually to similar to 0.05% (0.1 K) near the surface. In summary, the ARO FSI successfully retrieves the fine vertical structure of the atmosphere in the presence of multipath in the lower troposphere.

Zhang, WX, Lou YD, Gu SF, Shi C, Haase JS, Liu JN.  2016.  Joint estimation of GPS/BDS real-time clocks and initial results. Gps Solutions. 20:665-676.   10.1007/s10291-015-0476-y   AbstractWebsite

We present the joint estimation model for Global Positioning System/BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (GPS/BDS) real-time clocks and present the initial satellite clock solutions determined from 106 stations of the international GNSS service multi-GNSS experiment and the BeiDou experimental tracking stations networks for 1 month in December, 2012. The model is shown to be efficient enough to have no practical computational limit for producing 1-Hz clock updates for real-time applications. The estimated clocks were assessed through the comparison with final clock products and the analysis of post-fit residuals. Using the estimated clocks and corresponding orbit products (GPS ultra-rapid-predicted and BDS final orbits), the root-mean-square (RMS) values of coordinate differences from ground truth values are around 1 and 2-3 cm for GPS-only and BDS-only daily mean static precise point positioning (PPP) solutions, respectively. Accuracy of GPS/BDS combined static PPP solutions falls in between that of GPS-only and BDS-only PPP results, with RMS values approximately 1-2 cm in all three components. For static sites, processed in the kinematic PPP mode, the daily RMS values are normally within 4 and 6 cm after convergence for GPS-only and BDS-only results, respectively. In contrast, the combined GPS/BDS kinematic PPP solutions show higher accuracy and shorter convergence time. Additionally, the BDS-only kinematic PPP solutions using clock products derived from the proposed joint estimation model were superior compared to those computed using the single-system estimation model.

Zhang, WX, Haase JS, Hertzog A, Lou YD, Vincent R.  2016.  Improvement of stratospheric balloon GPS positioning and the impact on gravity wave parameter estimation for the Concordiasi campaign in Antarctica. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 121:9977-9997.   10.1002/2015jd024596   AbstractWebsite

Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in transferring energy and momentum from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere. However, shorter-scale GWs are generally not explicitly resolved in general circulation models but need to be parameterized instead. Super pressure balloons provide direct access to measure GW characteristics as a function of wave intrinsic frequency that are needed for these parameterizations. The 30s sampling rate of the GPS receivers carried on the balloons deployed in the 2010 Concordiasi campaign in the Antarctic is much higher compared to the previous campaigns and can cover the full range of the GW spectrum. Two among 19 balloons are also equipped with the dual-frequency GPS receivers initially developed for GPS radio occultation research in addition to the single-frequency receivers, which are expected to provide better positions for GW parameter estimations. Improvements of the positions are significant, from similar to 3-10m horizontal and similar to 5m vertical to similar to 0.1 and 0.2m, respectively, which makes it possible to resolve the Eulerian pressure independently of altitude for the intrinsic phase speed estimation. The lower position accuracy in the previous analysis of campaign results from the single-frequency GPS receiver was primarily due to a problem with the onboard clock that is not present in the new results. The impacts of the position improvements on the final GW parameters are highlighted, with larger difference in momentum flux for the shorter-scale GWs than for the longer scale GWs and significant difference in the distribution of the intrinsic phase speed.

Wang, KN, Garrison JL, Acikoz U, Haase JS, Murphy BJ, Muradyan P, Lulich T.  2016.  Open-loop tracking of rising and setting GPS radio-occultation signals from an airborne platform: Signal model and error analysis. Ieee Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing. 54:3967-3984.   10.1109/tgrs.2016.2532346   AbstractWebsite

Global Positioning System (GPS) radio-occultation (RO) is an atmospheric sounding technique utilizing the received GPS signal through the stratified atmosphere to measure refractivity, which provides information on temperature and humidity. The GPS-RO technique is now operational on several Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites, which cannot provide high temporal and spatial resolution soundings necessary to observe localized transient events, such as tropical storms. An airborne RO (ARO) system has thus been developed for localized GPS-RO campaigns. RO signals in the lower troposphere are adversely affected by rapid phase accelerations and severe signal power fading. These signal dynamics often cause the phase-locked loop in conventional GPS survey receivers to lose lock in the lower troposphere, and the open-loop (OL) tracking in postprocessing is used to overcome this problem. OL tracking also allows robust processing of rising GPS signals, approximately doubling the number of observed occultations. An approach for "backward" OL tracking was developed, in which the correlations are computed sequentially in reverse time so that the signal can be acquired and tracked at high elevations for rising occultations. Ultimately, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) limits the depth of tracking in the atmosphere. We have developed a model relating the SNR to the variance in the residual phase of the observed signal produced from OL tracking. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of the phase variance model to airborne data. We then apply this model to set a threshold on refractivity retrieval based upon the cumulative unwrapping error bias to determine the altitude limit for reliable signal tracking. We also show consistency between the ARO SNR and collocated COSMIC satellite observations and use these results to evaluate the antenna requirements for an improved ARO system.

2015
Moore, AW, Small IJ, Gutman SI, Bock Y, Dumas JL, Fang P, Haase JS, Jackson ME, Laber JL.  2015.  National Weather Service forecasters use GPS precipitable water vapor for enhanced situational awareness during the Southern California summer monsoon. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 96:1867-1877.   10.1175/bams-d-14-00095.1   AbstractWebsite

During the North American Monsoon, low-to-midlevel moisture is transported in surges from the Gulf of California and Eastern Pacific Ocean into Mexico and the American Southwest. As rising levels of precipitable water interact with the mountainous terrain, severe thunderstorms can develop, resulting in flash floods that threaten life and property. The rapid evolution of these storms, coupled with the relative lack of upper-air and surface weather observations in the region, make them difficult to predict and monitor, and guidance from numerical weather prediction models can vary greatly under these conditions. Precipitable water vapor (PW) estimates derived from continuously operating ground-based GPS receivers have been available for some time from NOAA's GPS-Met program, but these observations have been of limited utility to operational forecasters in part due to poor spatial resolution. Under a NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology project, 37 real-time stations were added to NOAA's GPS-Met analysis providing 30-min PW estimates, reducing station spacing from approximately 150 km to 30 km in Southern California. An 18-22 July 2013 North American Monsoon event provided an opportunity to evaluate the utility of the additional upper-air moisture observations to enhance National Weather Service (NWS) forecaster situational awareness during the rapidly developing event. NWS forecasters used these additional data to detect rapid moisture increases at intervals between the available 1-6-h model updates and approximately twice-daily radiosonde observations, and these contributed tangibly to the issuance of timely flood watches and warnings in advance of flash floods, debris flows, and related road closures.

Melgar, D, Geng JH, Crowell BW, Haase JS, Bock Y, Hammond WC, Allen RM.  2015.  Seismogeodesy of the 2014 M(w)6.1 Napa earthquake, California: Rapid response and modeling of fast rupture on a dipping strike-slip fault. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 120:5013-5033.   10.1002/2015jb011921   AbstractWebsite

Real-time high-rate geodetic data have been shown to be useful for rapid earthquake response systems during medium to large events. The 2014 M(w)6.1 Napa, California earthquake is important because it provides an opportunity to study an event at the lower threshold of what can be detected with GPS. We show the results of GPS-only earthquake source products such as peak ground displacement magnitude scaling, centroid moment tensor (CMT) solution, and static slip inversion. We also highlight the retrospective real-time combination of GPS and strong motion data to produce seismogeodetic waveforms that have higher precision and longer period information than GPS-only or seismic-only measurements of ground motion. We show their utility for rapid kinematic slip inversion and conclude that it would have been possible, with current real-time infrastructure, to determine the basic features of the earthquake source. We supplement the analysis with strong motion data collected close to the source to obtain an improved postevent image of the source process. The model reveals unilateral fast propagation of slip to the north of the hypocenter with a delayed onset of shallow slip. The source model suggests that the multiple strands of observed surface rupture are controlled by the shallow soft sediments of Napa Valley and do not necessarily represent the intersection of the main faulting surface and the free surface. We conclude that the main dislocation plane is westward dipping and should intersect the surface to the east, either where the easternmost strand of surface rupture is observed or at the location where the West Napa fault has been mapped in the past.

Murphy, BJ, Haase JS, Muradyan P, Garrison JL, Wang KN.  2015.  Airborne GPS radio occultation refractivity profiles observed in tropical storm environments. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 120:1690-1709.   10.1002/2014jd022931   AbstractWebsite

Airborne GPS radio occultation (ARO) data have been collected during the 2010 PRE-Depression Investigation of Cloud systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) experiment. GPS signals received by the airborne Global Navigation Satellite System Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) are used to retrieve vertical profiles of refractivity in the neutral atmosphere. The system includes a conventional geodetic GPS receiver component for straightforward validation of the analysis method in the middle to upper troposphere, and a high-sample rate (10 MHz) GPS recorder for postprocessing complex signals that probe the lower troposphere. The results from the geodetic receivers are presented here. The retrieved ARO profiles consistently agree within similar to 2% of refractivity profiles calculated from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting model Interim reanalyses as well as from nearby dropsondes and radiosondes. Changes in refractivity obtained from ARO data over the 5days leading to the genesis of tropical storm Karl are consistent with moistening in the vicinity of the storm center. An open-loop tracking method was implemented in a test case to analyze GPS signals from the GISMOS 10 MHz recording system for comparison with geodetic receiver data. The open-loop mode successfully tracked similar to 2 km deeper into the troposphere than the conventional receiver and can also track rising occultations, illustrating the benefit from the high-rate recording system. Accurate refractivity retrievals are an important first step toward the future goal of assimilating moisture profiles to improve forecasting of developing storms using this new GPS occultation technique.

Villamil-Otero, G, Meiszberg R, Haase JS, Min KH, Jury MR, Braun JJ.  2015.  Topographic-thermal circulations and GPS-measured moisture variability around Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Earth Interactions. 19   10.1175/ei-d-14-0022.1   AbstractWebsite

To investigate topographic-thermal circulations and the associated moisture variability over western Puerto Rico, field data were collected from 15 to 31 March 2011. Surface meteorological instruments and ground-based GPS receivers measured the circulation and precipitable water with high spatial and temporal resolution, and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model was used to simulate the mesoscale flow at 1-km resolution. A westerly onshore flow of similar to 4ms(-1) over Mayaguez Bay was observed on many days, due to an interaction between thermally driven [3 degrees C (10 km)(-1)] sea-breeze circulation and an island wake comprised of twin gyres. The thermally driven sea breeze occurred only when easterly synoptic winds favorably oriented the gyres with respect to the coast. Moisture associated with onshore flow was characterized by GPS measured precipitable water (PW). There is diurnal cycling of PW > 3 cm over the west coast during periods of onshore flow. The WRF Model tends to overestimate PWon the west side of the island, suggesting evapotranspiration as a process needing further attention. Fluctuations of PW affect local rainfall in times of convective instability.

2014
Haase, JS, Murphy BJ, Muradyan P, Nievinski FG, Larson KM, Garrison JL, Wang K-N.  2014.  First results from an airborne GPS radio occultation system for atmospheric profiling. Geophysical Research Letters. :n/a–n/a.   10.1002/2013GL058681   AbstractWebsite

Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) from low Earth-orbiting satellites has increased the quantity of high-vertical resolution atmospheric profiles, especially over oceans, and has significantly improved global weather forecasting. A new system, the Global Navigation Satellite Systems Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS), has been developed for RO sounding from aircraft. GISMOS also provides high-vertical resolution profiles that are insensitive to clouds and precipitation, and in addition, provides greater control on the sampling location, useful for targeted regional studies. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated with a flight carried out during development of an Atlantic tropical storm. The data have been evaluated through a comparison with dropsonde data. The new airborne RO system will effectively increase by more than 50% the number of profiles available for studying the evolution of tropical storms during this campaign and could potentially be deployed on commercial aircraft in the future.

2013
Bowling, T, Calais E, Haase JS.  2013.  Detection and modelling of the ionospheric perturbation caused by a Space Shuttle launch using a network of ground-based Global Positioning System stations. Geophysical Journal International. 192:1324-1331.   10.1093/gji/ggs101   AbstractWebsite

The exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle during its ascent triggers acoustic waves which propagate through the atmosphere and induce electron density changes at ionospheric heights which changes can be measured using ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) phase data. Here, we use a network of GPS stations to study the acoustic wave generated by the STS-125 Space Shuttle launch on May 11, 2009. We detect the resulting changes in ionospheric electron density, with characteristics that are typical of acoustic waves triggered by explosions at or near the Earth's surface or in the atmosphere. We successfully reproduce the amplitude and timing of the observed signal using a ray-tracing model with a moving source whose amplitude is directly scaled by a physical model of the shuttle exhaust energy, acoustic propagation in a dispersive atmosphere and a simplified two-fluid model of collisions between neutral gas and free electrons in the ionosphere. The close match between observed and model waveforms validates the modelling approach. This raises the possibility of using ground-based GPS networks to estimate the acoustic energy release of explosive sources near the Earth's surface or in atmosphere, and to constrain some atmospheric acoustic parameters.

Geng, JH, Bock Y, Melgar D, Crowell BW, Haase JS.  2013.  A new seismogeodetic approach applied to GPS and accelerometer observations of the 2012 Brawley seismic swarm: Implications for earthquake early warning. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 14:2124-2142.   10.1002/ggge.20144   AbstractWebsite

The 26 August 2012 Brawley seismic swarm of hundreds of events ranging from M1.4 to M5.5 in the Salton Trough, California provides a unique data set to investigate a new seismogeodetic approach that combines Global Positioning System (GPS) and accelerometer observations to estimate displacement and velocity waveforms. First in simulated real-time mode, we analyzed 1-5 Hz GPS data collected by 17 stations fully encircling the swarm zone at near-source distances up to about 40km using precise point positioning with ambiguity resolution (PPP-AR). We used a reference network of North American GPS stations well outside the region of deformation to estimate fractional-cycle biases and satellite clock parameters, which were then combined with ultrarapid orbits from the International GNSS Service to estimate positions during the Brawley seismic swarm. Next, we estimated seismogeodetic displacements and velocities from GPS phase and pseudorange observations and 100-200 Hz accelerations collected at three pairs of GPS and seismic stations in close proximity using a new tightly coupled Kalman filter approach as an extension of the PPP-AR process. We can clearly discern body waves in the velocity waveforms, including P-wave arrivals not detectable with the GPS-only approach for earthquake magnitudes as low as M-w 4.6 and significant static offsets for magnitudes as low as M-w 5.4. Our study shows that GPS networks upgraded with strong motion accelerometers can provide new information for improved understanding of the earthquake rupture process and be of critical value in creating a robust early warning system for any earthquake of societal significance.

Symithe, SJ, Calais E, Haase JS, Freed AM, Douilly R.  2013.  Coseismic slip distribution of the 2010 m 7.0 Haiti earthquake and resulting stress changes on regional faults. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 103:2326-2343.   10.1785/0120120306   AbstractWebsite

The 12 January 2010 M-w 7.0 Haiti earthquake ruptured the previously unmapped Leogane fault, a secondary transpressional structure located close to the Enriquillo fault, the major fault system assumed to be the primary source of seismic hazard for southern Haiti. In the absence of a precise aftershock catalog, previous estimations of coseismic slip had to infer the rupture geometry from geodetic and/or seismological data. Here we use a catalog of precisely relocated aftershocks beginning one month after the event and covering the following 5 months to constrain the rupture geometry, estimate a slip distribution from an inversion of Global Positional Systems (GPS), Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and coastal uplift data, and calculate the resulting changes of Coulomb failure stress on neighboring faults. The relocated aftershocks confirm a north-dipping structure consistent with the Leogane fault, as inferred from previous slip inversions, but with two subfaults, each corresponding to a major slip patch. The rupture increased Coulomb stresses on the shallow Enriquillo fault parallel to the Leogane rupture surface and to the west (Miragoane area) and east (Port-au-Prince). Results show that the cluster of reverse faulting earthquakes observed further to the west, coincident with the offshore Trois Baies fault, are triggered by an increase in Coulomb stress. Other major regional faults did not experience a significant change in stress. The increase of stress on faults such as the Enriquillo are a concern, as this could advance the timing of future events on this fault, still capable of magnitude 7 or greater earthquakes.

Douilly, R, Haase JS, Ellsworth WL, Bouin MP, Calais E, Symithe SJ, Armbruster JG, de Lepinay BM, Deschamps A, Mildor SL, Meremonte ME, Hough SE.  2013.  Crustal structure and fault geometry of the 2010 Haiti earthquake from temporary seismometer deployments. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 103:2305-2325.   10.1785/0120120303   AbstractWebsite

Haiti has been the locus of a number of large and damaging historical earthquakes. The recent 12 January 2010 M-w 7.0 earthquake affected cities that were largely unprepared, which resulted in tremendous losses. It was initially assumed that the earthquake ruptured the Enriquillo Plantain Garden fault (EPGF), a major active structure in southern Haiti, known from geodetic measurements and its geomorphic expression to be capable of producing M 7 or larger earthquakes. Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data, however, showed that the event ruptured a previously unmapped fault, the Leogane fault, a north-dipping oblique transpressional fault located immediately north of the EPGF. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks, including ocean-bottom seismometers on either side of the EPGF. We use data from the complete set of stations deployed after the event, on land and offshore, to relocate all aftershocks from 10 February to 24 June 2010, determine a 1D regional crustal velocity model, and calculate focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined dataset clearly delineate the Leogane fault, with a geometry close to that inferred from geodetic data. Its strike and dip closely agree with the global centroid moment tensor solution of the mainshock but with a steeper dip than inferred from previous finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a structure with shallower southward dip offshore and to the west of the rupture zone, which could indicate triggered seismicity on the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault. We use first-motion focal mechanisms to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the triggered aftershocks.

Crowell, BW, Melgar D, Bock Y, Haase JS, Geng JH.  2013.  Earthquake magnitude scaling using seismogeodetic data. Geophysical Research Letters. 40:6089-6094.   10.1002/2013gl058391   AbstractWebsite

The combination of GPS and strong-motion data to estimate seismogeodetic waveforms creates a data set that is sensitive to the entire spectrum of ground displacement and the full extent of coseismic slip. In this study we derive earthquake magnitude scaling relationships using seismogeodetic observations of either P wave amplitude or peak ground displacements from five earthquakes in Japan and California ranging in magnitude from 5.3 to 9.0. The addition of the low-frequency component allows rapid distinction of earthquake size for large magnitude events with high precision, unlike accelerometer data that saturate for earthquakes greater than M 7 to 8, and is available well before the coseismic displacements are emplaced. These results, though based on a limited seismogeodetic data set, support earlier studies that propose it may be possible to estimate the final magnitude of an earthquake well before the rupture is complete.

Muradyan, P, Haase JS, Acikoz U, Garrison JL, Xie F, Lulich T, Ventre BD.  2013.  Profiling the atmosphere with the airborne GPS radio occultation technique using open-loop tracking. Journal of Geophysical Research. in review Abstract

The GNSS Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) is designed for dense sampling of meteorological targets using airborne radio occultation (RO). This limb-sounding technique measures the signal Doppler shift due to refraction and retrieves refractivity profiles that are directly related to pressure, temperature and moisture. These first results from the airborne RO system demonstrate the potential to contribute to numerical weather prediction by reliably providing many high vertical resolution profiles in an area of interest compared to similar measurements made from space. GISMOS includes a Global Positioning System radio frequency signal recorder for open-loop (OL) tracking of the signal in the lower troposphere, where conventional closed-loop receivers fail. The first comprehensive performance analysis of the airborne OL profiling method is presented, showing that OL tracking consistently samples as low as 0.3 to 3.4 km altitude for both rising and setting occultations. The only missed occultations during the 5-hour flight are due to missing global tracking network data and aircraft turns. The system on a straight flight path would measure, on average, 3 occultations per hour of flight. The refractivity profiles found using a geometric optics retrieval algorithm closely follow the vertical variations seen in the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting analysis with a standard deviation of 1.5\% at upper and mid-tropospheric levels, well within the range of observation errors typically assigned during assimilation of RO data. However, the data currently have large biases. Potential causes for the retrieval biases are discussed.

Melgar, D, Crowell BW, Bock Y, Haase JS.  2013.  Rapid modeling of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake with seismogeodesy. Geophysical Research Letters.   10.1002/grl.50590   AbstractWebsite

Rapid characterization of finite fault geometry and slip for large earthquakes is important for mitigation of seismic and tsunamigenic hazards. Saturation of near-source weak motion and problematic integration of strong-motion data into displacements make this difficult in real time. Combining GPS and accelerometer data to estimate seismogeodetic displacement waveforms overcomes these limitations by providing mm-level three-dimensional accuracy and improved estimation of coseismic deformation compared to GPS-only methods. We leverage collocated GPS and accelerometer data from the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan earthquake by replaying them in simulated real-time mode. Using a novel approach to account for fault finiteness, we generate an accurate centroid moment tensor solution independently of any constraint on the slab geometry followed by a finite fault slip model. The replay of GPS and seismic data demonstrates that robust models could have been made available within 3 min of earthquake initiation.

2012
Douilly, R, Haase JS, Ellsworth WL, Bouin M-P, Calais E, Symithe S, Armbruster JG, Mercier De Lepinay BF, Deschamps A, Saint-Louis M, Meremonte ME, Hough SE.  2012.  Improving the resolution of the 2010 Haiti earthquake fault geometry using temporary seismometer deployments. Bull. Seis. Soc. Am. in review Abstract

Haiti has several active faults that are capable of producing large earthquakes such as the 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake. This earthquake was not unexpected, given geodetic measurements showing strain accumulation on the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault Zone, the major fault system in southern Haiti (Manaker et al. 2008). GPS and INSAR data (Calais et al., 2010) show, however, that this rupture occurred on the previously unmapped Léogâne fault, a 60° north dipping oblique blind thrust located immediately north of the Enriquillo Fault. Following the earthquake, several groups installed temporary seismic stations to record aftershocks. Natural Resources Canada installed three broadband seismic stations, Géoazur installed 21 ocean bottom seismometers, L’Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris installed 5 broadband seismometers, and the United States Geological Survey deployed 17 short period and strong motion seismometers in and around Port-au-Prince. We use data from this complete set of stations, along with data from permanent regional stations, to relocate all of the events from March 17 to June 24, to determine the regional one-dimensional crustal structure and determine focal mechanisms. The aftershock locations from the combined data set clearly delineate the Léogâne fault. The strike and dip closely agrees with that of the global centroid moment tensor solution, but appears to be more steeply dipping than the finite fault inversions. The aftershocks also delineate a flat structure on the west side of the rupture zone and may indicate triggered seismicity on the Trois Baies fault, although the depths of these events are not as well constrained. There is no clear evidence for aftershocks on the other rupture segments inferred in the Hayes et al. (2010) mainshock rupture model. There is a cluster of aftershocks in the hanging wall near the western patch of high slip identified by Calais et al. (2010) and Meng et al. (2011), or central patch in the Hayes et al. (2010) model. We use first-motion focal mechanism solutions to clarify the relationship of the fault geometry to the mechanisms of the larger events.

Evans, C, Archambault HM, Cordeira JM, Fritz C, Galarneau Jr. TJ, Gjorjievska S, Griffin KS, Johnson A, Komaromi WA, Monette S, Muradyan P, Murphy B, Riemer M, Sears J, Stern D, Tang B, Thompson S.  2012.  The Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud-systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) field campaign: Perspectives of early career scientists. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 92:173-187.   10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00024.1  
Montgomery, MT, Davis C, Dunkerton TJ, Wang Z, Velden C, Torn R, Majumdar S, Zhang F, Smith RK, Bosart L, Bell MM, Haase JS, Heymsfield A, Jensen J, Campos T, Boothe MA.  2012.  The Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) Experiment: Scientific basis, new analysis tools and some first results. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 92:153-172.   10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00046.1  
Haase, JS, Maldonado-Vargas J, Rabier F, Cocquerez P, Minois M, Guidard V, Wyss P, Johnson AV.  2012.  A Proof-of-Concept Balloon-borne GPS Radio Occultation Profiling System for Polar Studies. Geophysical Research Letters. 39:doi:10.1029/2011GL049982.   doi:10.1029/2011GL049982   Abstract

Global warming has focused attention on the polar regions and recent changes in sea and land ice distribution. Accurate modeling of the future evolution of climate and weather in the Antarctic relies heavily on remote sensing observations. However, their reliable assimilation into numerical weather models and reanalyses is challenging because of the unique environment and sparsity of in-situ observations for validation. We developed a stratospheric balloon-borne GPS radio occultation system for the 2010 Concordiasi campaign to provide refractivity and derived temperature profiles for improving satellite data assimilation. The observed excess phase delay profiles agree with those simulated from model and dropsonde profiles. 711 occultations were recorded from two balloons, comparable to the number of profiles acquired by 13 driftsonde balloons. Of these profiles, 32% descended to 4 km above the surface, without open-loop receiver tracking technology, demonstrating it is possible to retrieve useful information with relatively simple low cost instruments.

2011
Haase, JS, Nowack RL.  2011.  Earthquake scenario ground motions for the urban area of Evansville, Indiana. Seismological Research Letters. 82:176-185.
Garrison, JL, Voo J, Yueh SH, Grant MS, Fore AG, Haase JS.  2011.  The estimation of sea surface roughness effects in microwave radiometric measurements of salinity using reflected Global Navigation Satellite System signals. IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters. PP:1-5.   10.1109/LGRS.2011.2159323   Abstract

In February–March 2009, an airborne field campaign was conducted using the Passive Active L- and S-band (PALS) microwave sensor and the Ku-band Polarimetric Scatterometer to collect measurements of brightness temperature and near-surface wind speeds. Flights were conducted over a region of expected high-speed winds in the Atlantic Ocean, for the purposes of algorithm development for sea surface salinity (SSS) retrievals. Wind speeds encountered during the March 2, 2009, flight ranged from 5 to 25 m/s. The Global Positioning System (GPS) delay mapping receiver from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center was also flown to collect GPS signals reflected from the ocean surface and generate postcorrelation power-versus-delay measurements. These data were used to estimate ocean surface roughness. These estimates were found to be strongly correlated with PALS-measured brightness temperature. Initial results suggest that reflected GPS measurements made using small low-power instruments can be used to correct the roughness effects in radiometer brightness temperature measurements to retrieve accurate SSS.