Publications

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2019
Darling, ES, McClanahan TR, Maina J, Gurney GG, Graham NAJ, Januchowski-Hartley F, Cinner JE, Mora C, Hicks CC, Maire E, Puotinen M, Skirving WJ, Adjeroud M, Ahmadia G, Arthur R, Bauman AG, Beger M, Berumen ML, Bigot L, Bouwmeester J, Brenier A, Bridge TCL, Brown E, Campbell SJ, Cannon S, Cauvin B, Chen CA, Claudet J, Denis V, Donner S, Estradivari, Fadli N, Feary DA, Fenner D, Fox H, Franklin EC, Friedlander A, Gilmour J, Goiran C, Guest J, Hobbs JPA, Hoey AS, Houk P, Johnson S, Jupiter SD, Kayal M, Kuo CY, Lamb J, Lee MAC, Low J, Muthiga N, Muttaqin E, Nand Y, Nash KL, Nedlic O, Pandolfi JM, Pardede S, Patankar V, Penin L, Ribas-Deulofeu L, Richards Z, Roberts TE, Rodgers KS, Safuan CDM, Sala E, Shedrawi G, Sin TM, Smallhorn-West P, Smith JE, Sommer B, Steinberg PD, Sutthacheep M, Tan CHJ, Williams GJ, Wilson S, Yeemin T, Bruno JF, Fortin MJ, Krkosek M, Mouillot D.  2019.  Social-environmental drivers inform strategic management of coral reefs in the Anthropocene. Nature Ecology & Evolution. 3:1341-1350.   10.1038/s41559-019-0953-8   AbstractWebsite

Without drastic efforts to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate globalized stressors, tropical coral reefs are in jeopardy. Strategic conservation and management requires identification of the environmental and socioeconomic factors driving the persistence of scleractinian coral assemblages-the foundation species of coral reef ecosystems. Here, we compiled coral abundance data from 2,584 Indo-Pacific reefs to evaluate the influence of 21 climate, social and environmental drivers on the ecology of reef coral assemblages. Higher abundances of framework-building corals were typically associated with: weaker thermal disturbances and longer intervals for potential recovery; slower human population growth; reduced access by human settlements and markets; and less nearby agriculture. We therefore propose a framework of three management strategies (protect, recover or transform) by considering: (1) if reefs were above or below a proposed threshold of >10% cover of the coral taxa important for structural complexity and carbonate production; and (2) reef exposure to severe thermal stress during the 2014-2017 global coral bleaching event. Our findings can guide urgent management efforts for coral reefs, by identifying key threats across multiple scales and strategic policy priorities that might sustain a network of functioning reefs in the Indo-Pacific to avoid ecosystem collapse.

2018
d'Auriac, IG, Quinn RA, Maughan H, Nothias LF, Little M, Kapono CA, Cobian A, Reyes BT, Green K, Quistad SD, Leray M, Smith JE, Dorrestein PC, Rohwer F, Deheyn DD, Hartmann AC.  2018.  Before platelets: the production of platelet-activating factor during growth and stress in a basal marine organism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences. 285   10.1098/rspb.2018.1307   AbstractWebsite

Corals and humans represent two extremely disparate metazoan lineages and are therefore useful for comparative evolutionary studies. Two lipid-based molecules that are central to human immunity, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF were recently identified in scleractinian corals. To identify processes in corals that involve these molecules, PAF and Lyso-PAF biosynthesis was quantified in conditions known to stimulate PAF production in mammals (tissue growth and exposure to elevated levels of ultraviolet light) and in conditions unique to corals (competing with neighbouring colonies over benthic space). Similar to observations in mammals, PAF production was higher in regions of active tissue growth and increased when corals were exposed to elevated levels of ultraviolet light. PAF production also increased when corals were attacked by the stinging cells of a neighbouring colony, though only the attacked coral exhibited an increase in PAF. This reaction was observed in adjacent areas of the colony, indicating that this response is coordinated across multiple polyps including those not directly subject to the stress. PAF and Lyso-PAF are involved in coral stress responses that are both shared with mammals and unique to the ecology of cnidarians.