Publications

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2014
Curray, JR.  2014.  The Bengal Depositional System: From rift to orogeny. Marine Geology. 352:59-69.   10.1016/j.margeo.2014.02.001   AbstractWebsite

The Bengal Depositional System is defined as the surface depositional environments and the underlying sediment accumulation extending from the alluvial, lacustrine and paludal sediments of the lower Ganges and Brahmaputra Rivers, across the Bengal Delta, the Bangladesh continental shelf and slope to and including the Bengal Fan. Together it is one of the greatest sediment accumulations in the modern world, and is comparable in volume to the great sediment accumulations of the geological past. The history of formation started with the Mesozoic breakup of Eastern Gondwanaland, the northward drift of India, its collision with the southern margin of Asia, rotation and bending of the western Sunda Arc, and the penetration of the Indian continental mass into southern Asia. During this history, the regional tectonics evolved and sources and provenance of the sediments changed with the ultimate uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalayas. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

2005
Curray, JR.  2005.  Tectonics and history of the Andaman Sea region. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences. 25:187-228.   10.1016/j.jseaes.2004.09.001   AbstractWebsite

The Andaman Sea is an active backarc basin lying above and behind the Sunda subduction zone where convergence between the overriding Southeast Asian plate and the subducting Australian plate is highly oblique. The effect of the oblique convergence has been formation of a sliver plate between the subduction zone and a complex right-lateral fault system. The late Paleocene collision of Greater India and Asia with approximately normal convergence started clockwise rotation and bending of the northern and western Sunda Arc. The initial sliver fault, which probably started in the Eocene, extended through the outer arc ridge offshore from Sumatra, through the present region of the Andaman Sea into the Sagaing Fault. With more oblique convergence due to the rotation, the rate of strike-slip motion increased and a series of extensional basins opened obliquely by the combination of backarc extension and the strike-slip motion. These basins in sequence are the Mergui Basin starting at similar to 32 Ma, the conjoined Alcock and Sewell Rises starting at similar to 23 Ma, East Basin separating the rises from the foot of the continental slope starting at similar to 15 Ma; and finally at similar to 4 Ma, the present plate edge was formed, Alcock and Sewell Rises were separated by formation of the Central Andaman Basin, and the faulting moved onshore from the Mentawai Fault to the Sumatra Fault System bisecting Sumatra. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1994
Curray, JR.  1994.  Sediment Volume and Mass beneath the Bay of Bengal. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 125:371-383.   10.1016/0012-821x(94)90227-5   AbstractWebsite

Rates of sediment accumulation and the amount of sedimentary fill in depocenters lying downstream of erosion in the Himalayas and Tibet can provide some insight into tectonics and geological history. The objective of this paper is to put on record the best estimates which are possible with existing data of the volume and mass of sediments, sedimentary rock and metasedimentary rock beneath the sea floor of the Bay of Bengal. The sedimentary section in the Bay of Bengal is divided into two parts: (1) Eocene through Holocene, sediments and sedimentary rocks which post-date the initial India-Asia collision: volume - 12.5 X 10(6) km3; mass = 2.88 X 10(16) t; this is most of the Bengal Fan, including its eastern lobe, the Nicobar Fan, plus some of the outer Bengal Delta; (2) Early Cretaceous through Paleocene, pre-collision sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks: volume = 4.36 X 10(6) km 3; mass = 1.13 to 1.18 X 10(16) t; these are interpreted as continental rise and pelagic deposits.