Publications

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1994
Becker, L, Bada JL, Winans RE, Hunt JE, Bunch TE, French BM.  1994.  Fullerenes in the 1.85-Billion-Year-Old Sudbury Impact Structure. Science. 265:642-645.   10.1126/science.11536660   AbstractWebsite

Fullerenes (C-60 and C-70) have been identified by laser desorption, laser desorption postionization, and high-resolution electron-impact mass spectrometry in shock-produced breccias (Onaping Formation) of the Sudbury impact structure in Ontario, Canada, The C-60 isotope is present at a level of a few parts per million. The fullerenes were likely synthesized within the impact plume from the carbon contained in the bolide. The oxidation of the fullerenes during the 1.85 billion years of exposure was apparently prevented by the presence of sulfur in the form of sulfide-silicate complexes associated with the fullerenes.

Chen, RF, Bada JL.  1994.  The Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic-Matter in Porewaters of Marine-Sediments. Marine Chemistry. 45:31-42.   10.1016/0304-4203(94)90089-2   AbstractWebsite

The fluorescence of porewaters from marine sediment cores from six different areas was measured. In most cases, fluorescence was affected primarily by the diagenesis of organic carbon first through sulfate reduction and subsequently by methane generation. Typically, fluorescence, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorbance, alkalinity, and ammonium ion concentrations correlate quite well, increasing in the upper sections of anoxic sediments and co-varying in deeper sections of these cores. The good correlation of DOC with fluorescence in the three cores in which DOC was measured indicates that fluorescence can be used to make a first order estimate of DOC concentration in anoxic porewaters. Data are consistent with a model in which labile organic matter in the sediments is broken down by sulfur reducing bacteria to low molecular weight monomers. These monomers are either remineralized to CO2 or polymerize to form dissolved, fluorescent, high molecular weight molecules. The few exceptions to this model involve hydrothermally generated hydrocarbons that are formed in situ in the Guaymas Basin or are horizontally advected along the decollement in the Nankai Trench.

Becker, L, Bada JL, Winans RE, Bunch TE.  1994.  Fullerenes in Allende Meteorite. Nature. 372:507-507.   10.1038/372507a0   Website
1992
Chen, RF, Bada JL.  1992.  The Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic-Matter in Seawater. Marine Chemistry. 37:191-221.   10.1016/0304-4203(92)90078-o   AbstractWebsite

A total of 28 vertical profiles of seawater fluorescence was measured in the Sargasso Sea, the Straits of Florida, the Southern California Borderlands, and the central Pacific Ocean. In all cases, surface seawater fluorescence was low as a result of photochemical bleaching which occurs on the timescale of hours. Fluorescence of deep water was 2-2.5 times higher than that of surface waters, and was constant, implying a long residence time for fluorescent organic matter, possibly of the order of thousands of years. Fluorescence correlates well with nutrients (NO3-, PO43-) in mid-depth waters ( 100-1000 m) in the Sargasso Sea and the central North Pacific, consistent with results in the central Pacific and the coastal seas of Japan. This suggests that regeneration or formation of fluorescent materials accompanies the oxidation and remineralization of settling organic particles. The various sources and sinks of fluorescent organic matter in the global oceans are assessed. The major sources are particles and in situ formation; rivers, rain, diffusion from sediments, and release from organisms are minor sources. The major sink is photochemical bleaching.