Publications

Export 3 results:
Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year  (Desc)]
2008
Botta, O, Martins Z, Emmenegger C, Dworkin JP, Glavin DP, Harvey RP, Zenobi R, Bada JL, Ehrenfreund P.  2008.  Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and amino acids in meteorites and ice samples from LaPaz Icefield, Antarctica. Meteoritics & Planetary Science. 43:1465-1480. AbstractWebsite

We have analyzed ice samples and meteorites from the LaPaz region of Antarctica to investigate the composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and amino acids with the goal to understand whether or not there is a compositional relationship between the two reservoirs. Four LL5 ordinary chondrites (OCs) and one CK carbonaceous chondrite were collected as part of the 2003/2004 ANSMET season. Ice samples collected from directly underneath the meteorites were extracted. In addition, exhaust particles from the snowmobiles used during the expedition were collected to investigate possible contributions from this source. The meteorite samples, the particulate matter and solid-state extracts of the ice samples and the exhaust filters were subjected to two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) to investigate the PAH composition. For amino acids analysis, the meteorites were extracted with water and acid hydrolyzed, and the extracts were analyzed with offline OPA/NAC derivatization combined with liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-FC/ToF-MS). PAHs in the particulate matter of the ice were found to be qualitatively similar to the meteorite samples, indicating that micron-sized grains of the meteorite may be embedded in the ice samples. The concentration levels of dissolved PAHs in all the ice samples were found to be below the detection limit of the L2MS. The PAH composition of the snowmobile exhaust is significantly different to the one in particulate matter, making it an unlikely Source of contamination for Antarctic meteorites. The amino acids glycine, beta-alanine and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid that were detected at concentrations of 3 to 19 parts per billion (ppb) are probably indigenous to the Antarctic meteorites. Some of the LaPaz ice samples were also found to contain amino acids at concentration levels of 1 to 33 parts per trillion (ppt), in particular alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), an abundant non-protein amino acid of extraterrestrial Origin found in some carbonaceous chondrites. We hypothesize that this amino acid could have been extracted from Antarctic micrometeorites and the particulate matter of the meteorites during the concentration procedure of the ice samples.

2004
Glavin, DP, Matrajt G, Bada JL.  2004.  Re-examination of amino acids in Antarctic micrometeorites. Space Life Sciences: Steps toward Origin(S) of Life. 33( Bernstein MP, Kress M, NavarroGonzalez R, Eds.).:106-113., Kidlington: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd   10.1016/j.asr.2003.02.011   Abstract

The delivery of amino acids by micrometeorites to the early Earth during the period of heavy bombardment (4.5-3.5 Ga) could have been a significant source of the Earth's prebiotic organic inventory. Antarctic micrometeorites (AMMs) in the 100-200 mum size range represent the dominant mass fraction of extraterrestrial material accreted by the Earth today. However, one problem is that these 'large' micrometeorite grains can be heated to very high temperatures (1000 to 1500 degreesC) during atmospheric deceleration, causing the amino acids to decompose. In this study, we have analyzed the acid-hydrolyzed, hot water extracts from 455 AMMs for the presence of amino acids using high performance liquid chromatography. For comparison, a 5 mg sample of the CM meteorite Murchison was also investigated. In the Murchison sample we found high levels (similar to3-4 parts-per-million, ppm) of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and isovaline, two non-protein amino acids that are extremely rare on Earth and are characteristic of amino acids of apparent extraterrestrial origin. In contrast, we were unable to detect any AIB above the 0.1 ppm level in the AMM samples studied. Only in one AMM sample from a previous study has AIB been detected (similar to300 ppm). To date, more than 600 AMMs have been analyzed for extraterrestrial amino acids. Although our results indicate that less than 5% of all AMMs contain detectable levels of AIB, we cannot rule out the possibility that AIB can be delivered to the Earth intact by a small percentage of AMMs that escaped extensive heating during atmospheric entry. (C) 2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1996
Bada, JL, McDonald GD.  1996.  Detecting amino acids on Mars. Analytical Chemistry. 68:A668-A673.Website