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1994
Chen, RF, Bada JL.  1994.  The Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic-Matter in Porewaters of Marine-Sediments. Marine Chemistry. 45:31-42.   10.1016/0304-4203(94)90089-2   AbstractWebsite

The fluorescence of porewaters from marine sediment cores from six different areas was measured. In most cases, fluorescence was affected primarily by the diagenesis of organic carbon first through sulfate reduction and subsequently by methane generation. Typically, fluorescence, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorbance, alkalinity, and ammonium ion concentrations correlate quite well, increasing in the upper sections of anoxic sediments and co-varying in deeper sections of these cores. The good correlation of DOC with fluorescence in the three cores in which DOC was measured indicates that fluorescence can be used to make a first order estimate of DOC concentration in anoxic porewaters. Data are consistent with a model in which labile organic matter in the sediments is broken down by sulfur reducing bacteria to low molecular weight monomers. These monomers are either remineralized to CO2 or polymerize to form dissolved, fluorescent, high molecular weight molecules. The few exceptions to this model involve hydrothermally generated hydrocarbons that are formed in situ in the Guaymas Basin or are horizontally advected along the decollement in the Nankai Trench.

1993
Chen, RF, Bada JL, Suzuki Y.  1993.  The Relationship between Dissolved Organic-Carbon (Doc) and Fluorescence in Anoxic Marine Porewaters - Implications for Estimating Benthic Doc Fluxes. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 57:2149-2153.   10.1016/0016-7037(93)90102-3   AbstractWebsite

Fluorescence and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) measurements of porewaters from the Santa Barbara Basin, the Guaymas Basin, and the upper sections of the Nankai Trough suggest that ultraviolet fluorescence (lambda(ex) = 325 nm, lambda(em) = 450 nm) may be used as a first order estimate of DOC in anoxic marine porewaters. The majority of porewater organic carbon appears to be fluorescent, while a constant approximately 1 mM DOC, probably the low molecular weight compounds, is not fluorescent. These data are consistent with a model in which low molecular weight compounds dissolved in porewater act as the common intermediate between labile sedimentary organic matter and remineralization or polymerization products. Fluorescence may also be used to sensitively estimate benthic DOC fluxes to the overlying water column. Results from the Santa Barbara Basin, if representative of global anoxic oceanic regions, indicate that DOC release from anoxic sediments is not a major source of oceanic DOC when compared to internal recycling rates, but may be comparable to external input or permanent removal processes.