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Wang, XS, Poinar HN, Poinar GO, Bada JL.  1995.  Amino acids in the amber matrix and in entombed insects. Amber, Resinite, and Fossil Resins. 617( Anderson KB, Crelling JC, Eds.).:255-262., Washington: Amer Chemical Soc Abstract

We have investigated the amino acids in both the bulk matrix and in insect inclusions in tree resins ranging in age from <100 years to 130 million years. The amino acid content of the resin matrix averages about 5 ppm and does not systematically vary with the age of the resin. The amino acids in the matrix are likely derived from either plant cells, or microorganisms, encapsulated when the resin solidified. The amino acid content of the insect tissues entombed in amber is less than that in modern insect specimens; this loss may be the result of oxidation reactions. The amino acid compositions of a fly and bee entombed in 30-40 million year old amber are somewhat different from the amino acid profiles of modern insects; this finding suggests that the preserved amino acid pattern under anhydrous conditions may not be the same as in aqueous environments. The amino acid racemization rate in amber insect inclusions is retarded by a factor of >10(4) compared to other geochemical environments on the surface of the Earth. This is also apparently due to the anhydrous properties of the amber matrix. The excellent preservation of amino acids in amber insect inclusions suggests that other biomolecules would also be preserved much better than in other geochemical environments. This conclusion is consistent with the reported successful retrieval of DNA sequences from amber-entombed organisms.

Wills, C, iBada J.  2000.  The Spark of LIfe: Darwin and the Primeval soup. : Perseus publishing
Wing, MR, Bada JL.  1991.  Geochromatography on the Parent Body of the Carbonaceous Chondrite Ivuna. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 55:2937-2942.   10.1016/0016-7037(91)90458-h   AbstractWebsite

Ivuna, a CI carbonaceous chondrite, has been found to contain abundant amounts of the three-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) phenanthrene/anthracene, but no detectable levels of the two- and four-ring PAHs naphthalene and pyrene/fluoranthene. Either the three-ring PAHs in Ivuna were synthesized in a process that did not produce the two- or four-ring PAHs, or all these compounds were synthesized together and subsequently separated. Thermodynamical considerations and studies of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion do not support the former possibility. Ivuna and other CI carbonaceous chondrites are known to have been extensively altered by water. The aqueous solubilities suggest that some PAHs would have been mobilized during the aqueous alteration phase in carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies. In a model geochromatography experiment, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene were partially resolved at a low pressure and flow rate utilizing columns containing crushed serpentine or beach sand, and water for elution. This laboratory geochromatography experiment suggests that complete separation of PAHs could be expected to occur in the parent body of CI carbonaceous chondrites. Such processes on Earth are known to lead to the formation of hydrothermal PAH minerals such as pendletonite. It is proposed that aqueous fluids driven by heat in the parent body of Ivuna migrated from the interior to the surface, in the process transporting, separating, and concentrating PAHs at various zones in the parent body.

Wing, MR, Bada JL.  1992.  The Origin of the Polycyclic Aromatic-Hydrocarbons in Meteorites. Origins of Life and Evolution of the Biosphere. 21:375-383. AbstractWebsite

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Cl and C2 Carbonaceous Chondrites appear to be the product of a high-temperature synthesis. This observation counters a prevailing view that PAHs in meteorites are a thermal alternation product of preexisting aliphatic compounds, which in turn required the presence of low-temperature mineral phases such as magnetite and hydrated phyllosilicates for their formation. Such a process would necessarily lead to a more low-temperature assemblage of PAHs, as many low-temperature minerals and compounds are extant in meteorites. Ivuna, a C1 carbonaceous chondrite, has been shown to contain abundant amounts of the three-ring PAHs phenanthrene/anthracene, but no detectable levels of the two- and four-ring PAHs naphthalene and pyrene/fluoranthene. Ivuna and other C1 carbonaceous chondrites are known to have been extensively altered by water. The aqueous solubilities of PAHs indicate that some PAHs would have been mobilized during the aqueous alteration phase in meteorite parent bodies. Model geochromatography experiments using crushed serpentine or beach sand as the solid phase and water for elution suggest that the complete separation of two, three, and four-ring PAHs could be expected to occur in the parent body of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. It is proposed that aqueous fluids driven by heat in the parent body of Ivuna migrated from the interior to the surface, in the process transporting, separating and concentrating PAHs at various zones in the parent body. The presence of indigenous PAHs and absence of indigenous amino acids in the H4 ordinary chondrite Forest Vale provides support for the contention that different processes and environments contributed to the synthesis of the organic matter in the solar system.