A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soils: Implications for the survival of exogenous organic material during impact delivery

Citation:
Brinton, KLF, Bada JL.  1996.  A reexamination of amino acids in lunar soils: Implications for the survival of exogenous organic material during impact delivery. Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta. 60:349-354.

Date Published:

Jan

Keywords:

carbonaceous chondrites, extracts, isotopic analyses, life, mixtures, molecules, murchison meteorite, reported optical-activity, samples

Abstract:

Using a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography technique, we have analyzed both the hot water extract and the acid hydrolyzed hot water extract of lunar soil collected during the Apollo 17 mission. Both free amino acids and those derived from acid labile precursors are present at a level of roughly 15 ppb. Based on the D/L amino acid ratios, the free alanine and aspartic acid observed in the hot water extract can be entirely attributed to terrestrial biogenic contamination. However, in the acid labile fraction, precursors which yield amino acids are apparently present in the lunar soil. The amino acid distribution suggests that the precursor is probably solar wind implanted HCN. We have evaluated our results with regard to the meteoritic input of intact organic compounds to the moon based on an upper limit of less than or equal to 0.3 ppb for alpha-aminoisobutyric acid, a non-protein amino acid which does not generally occur in terrestrial organisms and which is not a major amino acid produced from HCN, but which is a predominant amino acid in many carbonaceous chondrites. We find that the survival of exogenous organic compounds during lunar impact is less than or equal to 0.8%. This result represents an example of minimum organic impact survivability. This is an important first step toward a better understanding of similar processes on Earth and on Mars, and their possible contribution to the budget of prebiotic organic compounds on the primitive Earth.

Notes:

n/a

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DOI:

10.1016/0016-7037(95)00404-1