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2014
Beem, LH, Tulaczyk SM, King MA, Bougamont M, Fricker HA, Christoffersen P.  2014.  Variable deceleration of Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface. 119:212-224.   10.1002/2013jf002958   AbstractWebsite

The Whillans Ice Stream Ice Plain (WIP) has been slowing since at least 1963. Prior constraints on this slowdown were consistent with a constant long-term deceleration rate. New observations of ice velocity from 11 continuous and 3 seasonal GPS sites indicate the deceleration rate varies through time including on interannual time scales. Between 2009 and 2012 WIP decelerated at a rate (6.1 to 10.9 2 m/yr(2)) that was double the multidecadal average (3.0 to 5.6 2 m/yr(2)). To identify the causes of slowdown, we used new and prior velocity estimates to constrain longitudinal and transverse force budget models as well as a higher-order inverse model. All model results support the conclusion that the observed deceleration of WIP is caused by an increase in basal resistance to motion at a rate of 10 to 40 Pa/yr. Subglacial processes that may be responsible for strengthening the ice stream bed include basal freeze on, changes in subglacial hydrology, or increases in the area of resistant basal substrate through differential erosion. The observed variability in WIP deceleration rate suggests that dynamics in subglacial hydrology, plausibly driven by basal freeze on and/or activity of subglacial lakes, plays a key role in modulating basal resistance to ice motion in the region.

2002
Fricker, HA, Padman L.  2002.  Tides on Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf from ERS radar altimetry. Geophysical Research Letters. 29   10.1029/2001gl014175   AbstractWebsite

[1] We use harmonic analysis of 8 years of ERS satellite radar altimeter (RA) data at orbital crossovers to retrieve complex amplitude (amplitude and phase) coefficients for several major tidal harmonics over the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS), Antarctica. We describe a method for estimating the accuracy of this method, which ranges from similar to2 to 8 cm per harmonic. A comparison between M-2 complex amplitude from a recent ocean model and from our ERS RA analyses identifies two regions of the FRIS where the RA data are inconsistent with the model. In both regions the differences can be attributed to incorrect specification of the grounding line location in the model. Our study demonstrates the value of ERS RA data in Antarctic ice shelf tide modeling, and the potential for future altimeter satellites with high polar orbits to contribute to the definition of global tide height variations.

Fricker, HA, Young NW, Allison I, Coleman R.  2002.  Iceberg calving from the Amery Ice Shelf, East Antarctica. Annals of Glaciology, Vol 34, 2002. 34( Winther JG, Solberg R, Eds.).:241-246., Cambridge: Int Glaciological Soc   10.3189/172756402781817581   Abstract

We investigate the iceberg-calving cycle of the Amery Ice Shelf (AIS), East Antarctica, using evidence acquired between 1936 and 2000. The most recent major iceberg-calving event occurred between late 1963 and early 1964, when a large berg totalling about 10 000 km(2) in area broke From the ice front. The rate of forward advance of the ice front is presently 1300-1400 m a(-1). At this rate of advance, based on the present icefront position front recent RADARSAT imagery, it would take 20-25 years to attain the 1963 (pre-calve) position, suggesting that the AIS calving cycle has a period of approximately 60-70 years. Two longitudinal (parallel-to-flow) rifts, approximately 25 km apart at the AIS front, are observed in satellite imagery acquired over the last 14+ years. These rifts have formed at suture zones the shelf where neighbouring now-bands have separated in association with transverse spreading. The rifts were 15 km (rift A) and 26 km (rift B) in length in September 2000, and will probably become the sides of a large tabular iceberg (23 km x 25 km). A transverse (perpendicular-to-flow) fracture, visible at the upstream end of rift A in 1996, had propagated 6 km towards rift B by September 2000; when it meets rift B the iceberg will calve. A satellite image acquired in 1962 shows an embayment of this size in the AIS front, hence we deduce that this calving pattern also occurred during the last calving cycle, and therefore that the calving behaviour of the AIS apparently follows a regular pattern.