A decade of progress in observing and modelling Antarctic subglacial water systems

Citation:
Fricker, HA, Siegfried MR, Carter SP, Scambos TA.  2016.  A decade of progress in observing and modelling Antarctic subglacial water systems. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society a-Mathematical Physical and Engineering Sciences. 374

Date Published:

2016/01

Keywords:

Antarctic ice sheet, beneath, East Antarctica, flow, grounding-line, lake drainage, penetrating, radar, satellite altimetry, Sheet, Siple Coast, subglacial lakes, West Antarctica, Whillans ice stream

Abstract:

In the decade since the discovery of active Antarctic subglacial water systems by detection of subtle surface displacements, much progress has been made in our understanding of these dynamic systems. Here, we present some of the key results of observations derived from ICESat laser altimetry, CryoSat-2 radar altimetry, Operation IceBridge airborne laser altimetry, satellite image differencing and ground-based continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) experiments deployed in hydrologically active regions. These observations provide us with an increased understanding of various lake systems in Antarctica: Whillans/Mercer Ice Streams, Crane Glacier, Recovery Ice Stream, Byrd Glacier and eastern Wilkes Land. In several cases, subglacial water systems are shown to control ice flux through the glacier system. For some lake systems, we have been able to construct more than a decade of continuous lake activity, revealing internal variability on time scales ranging from days to years. This variability indicates that continuous, accurate time series of altimetry data are critical to understanding these systems. On Whillans Ice Stream, our results from a 5-year continuous GPS record demonstrate that subglacial lake flood events significantly change the regional ice dynamics. We also show how models for subglacial water flow have evolved since the availability of observations of lake volume change, from regional-scale models of water routeing to process models of channels carved into the subglacial sediment instead of the overlying ice. We show that progress in understanding the processes governing lake drainage now allows us to create simulated lake volume time series that reproduce time series from satellite observations. This transformational decade in Antarctic subglacial water research has moved us significantly closer to understanding the processes of water transfer sufficiently for inclusion in continental-scale ice-sheet models.

Notes:

n/a

Website

DOI:

10.1098/rsta.2014.0294

Scripps Publication ID:

20140294