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Wex, H, Dieckmann K, Roberts GC, Conrath T, Izaguirre MA, Hartmann S, Herenz P, Schafer M, Ditas F, Schmeissner T, Henning S, Wehner B, Siebert H, Stratmann F.  2016.  Aerosol arriving on the Caribbean island of Barbados: physical properties and origin. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 16:14107-14130.   10.5194/acp-16-14107-2016   AbstractWebsite

The marine aerosol arriving at Barbados (Ragged Point) was characterized during two 3-week long measurement periods in November 2010 and April 2011, in the context of the measurement campaign CARRIBA (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiation and tuRbulence in the trade wInd regime over BArbados). Through a comparison between ground-based and airborne measurements it was shown that the former are representative of the marine boundary layer at least up to cloud base. In general, total particle number concentrations (N-total) ranged from as low as 100 up to 800 cm(-3), while number concentrations for cloud condensation nuclei (N-CCN) at a supersaturation of 0.26% ranged from some 10 to 600 cm(-3). N-total and N-CCN depended on the air mass origin. Three distinct types of air masses were found. One type showed elevated values for both N-total and N-CCN and could be attributed to long-range transport from Africa, by which biomass burning particles from the Sahel region and/or mineral dust particles from the Sahara were advected. The second and third type both had values for N-CCN below 200 cm(-3) and a clear minimum in the particle number size distribution (NSD) around 70 to 80 nm (Hoppel minimum). While for one of these two types the accumulation mode was dominating (albeit less so than for air masses advected from Africa), the Aitken mode dominated the other and contributed more than 50% of all particles. These Aitken mode particles likely were formed by new particle formation no more than 3 days prior to the measurements. Hygroscopicity of particles in the CCN size range was determined from CCN measurements to be kappa = 0.66 on average, which suggests that these particles contain mainly sulfate and do not show a strong influence from organic material, which might generally be the case for the months during which measurements were made. The average kappa could be used to derive N-CCN from measured number size distributions, showing that this is a valid approach to obtain N-CCN. Although the total particulate mass sampled on filters was found to be dominated by Na+ and Cl-, this was found to be contributed by a small number of large particles (> 500 nm, mostly even in the super-micron size range). Based on a three-modal fit, a sea spray mode observed in the NSDs was found to contribute 90% to the total particulate mass but only 4 to 10% to N-total and up to 15% to N-CCN. This is in accordance with finding no correlation between N-total and wind speed.

Shinozuka, Y, Clarke AD, DeCarlo PF, Jimenez JL, Dunlea EJ, Roberts GC, Tomlinson JM, Collins DR, Howell SG, Kapustin VN, McNaughton CS, Zhou J.  2009.  Aerosol optical properties relevant to regional remote sensing of CCN activity and links to their organic mass fraction: airborne observations over Central Mexico and the US West Coast during MILAGRO/INTEX-B. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 9:6727-6742.   10.5194/acp-9-6727-2009   AbstractWebsite

Remote sensing of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) would help evaluate the indirect effects of tropospheric aerosols on clouds and climate. To assess its feasibility, we examined relationships of submicron aerosol composition to CCN activity and optical properties observed during the MILAGRO/INTEX-B aircraft campaigns. An indicator of CCN activity, kappa, was calculated from hygroscopicity measured under saturation. kappa for dry 100 nm particles decreased with increasing organic fraction of non-refractory mass of submicron particles (OMF) as 0.34-0.20xOMF over Central Mexico and 0.47-0.43xOMF over the US West Coast. These fits represent the critical dry diameter, centered near 100 nm for 0.2% supersaturation but varied as kappa((-1/3)), within measurement uncertainty (similar to 20%). The decreasing trends of CCN activity with the organic content, evident also in our direct CCN counts, were consistent with previous ground and laboratory observations of highly organic particles. The wider range of OMF, 0-0.8, for our research areas means that aerosol composition will be more critical for estimation of CCN concentration than at the fixed sites previously studied. Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of extinction was anti-correlated with OMF as -0.70xOMF+2.0 for Central Mexico's urban and industrial pollution air masses, for unclear reasons. The Angstrom exponent of absorption increased with OMF, more rapidly under higher single scattering albedo, as expected for the interplay between soot and colored weak absorbers ( some organic species and dust). Because remote sensing products currently use the wavelength dependence of extinction albeit in the column integral form and may potentially include that of absorption, these regional spectral dependencies are expected to facilitate retrievals of aerosol bulk chemical composition and CCN activity over Central Mexico.

Conant, WC, VanReken TM, Rissman TA, Varutbangkul V, Jonsson HH, Nenes A, Jimenez JL, Delia AE, Bahreini R, Roberts GC, Flagan RC, Seinfeld JH.  2004.  Aerosol-cloud drop concentration closure in warm cumulus. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 109   10.1029/2003jd004324   AbstractWebsite

[1] Our understanding of the activation of aerosol particles into cloud drops during the formation of warm cumulus clouds presently has a limited observational foundation. Detailed observations of aerosol size and composition, cloud microphysics and dynamics, and atmospheric thermodynamic state were collected in a systematic study of 21 cumulus clouds by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft during NASA's Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). An "aerosol-cloud'' closure study was carried out in which a detailed cloud activation parcel model, which predicts cloud drop concentration using observed aerosol concentration, size distribution, cloud updraft velocity, and thermodynamic state, is evaluated against observations. On average, measured droplet concentration in adiabatic cloud regions is within 15% of the predictions. This agreement is corroborated by independent measurements of aerosol activation carried out by two cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) counters on the aircraft. Variations in aerosol concentration, which ranged from 300 to 3300 cm(-3), drives large microphysical differences ( 250 2300 cm(-3)) observed among continental and maritime clouds in the South Florida region. This is the first known study in which a cloud parcel model is evaluated in a closure study using a constraining set of data collected from a single platform. Likewise, this is the first known study in which relationships among aerosol size distribution, CCN spectrum, and cloud droplet concentration are all found to be consistent with theory within experimental uncertainties much less than 50%. Vertical profiles of cloud microphysical properties ( effective radius, droplet concentration, dispersion) clearly demonstrate the boundary layer aerosol's effect on cloud microphysics throughout the lowest 1 km of cloud depth. Onboard measurements of aerosol hygroscopic growth and the organic to sulfate mass ratio are related to CCN properties. These chemical data are used to quantify the range of uncertainty associated with the simplified treatment of aerosol composition assumed in the closure study.

Ramana, MV, Ramanathan V, Kim D, Roberts GC, Corrigan CE.  2007.  Albedo, atmospheric solar absorption and heating rate measurements with stacked UAVs. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society. 133:1913-1931.   10.1002/qj.172   AbstractWebsite

This paper reports unique measurements of albedo, atmospheric solar absorption, and heating rates in the visible (0.4 to 0.7 mu m) and broadband (0.3 to 2.8 mu m) spectral regions using vertically stacked multiple lightweight autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The most significant finding of this study is that when absorbing aerosols and water vapour concentrations are measured accurately and accounted for in models, and when heating rates are measured directly with stacked aircraft, the simulated clear sky heating rates are consistent with the observed broadband heating rates within experimental errors (about 15%). We conclude that there is no need to invoke anomalous or excess absorption or unknown physics in clear skies. Aerosol-radiation-cloud measurements were made over the tropical Indian Ocean within the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere during the Maldives Autonomous UAV Campaign (MAC). The UAVs and ground-based remote sensing instruments determined most of the parameters required for calculating the albedo and vertical distribution of solar fluxes. The paper provides a refined analytical procedure to reduce errors and biases due to the offset errors arising from mounting of the radiometers on the aircraft and due to the aircraft attitude. Measured fluxes have been compared with those derived from a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer algorithm which can incorporate both gaseous and aerosol components. Under cloud-free conditions the calculated and measured incoming fluxes agree within 2-10 W m(-2) (<1%) depending upon the altitudes. Similarly, the measured and calculated reflected fluxes agreed within 2-5 W m(-2) (<5%). The analysis focuses on a cloud-free day when the air was polluted due to long-range transport from India, and the mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was 0.31 and mean single scattering albedo was 0.92. The UAV-measured absorption AOD, was 0.019 which agreed within 20% of the value of 0.024 reported by a ground-based instrument. The observed and simulated solar absorption agreed within 5% above 1.0 km and aerosol absorption accounted for 30% to 50% of the absorption depending upon the altitude and solar zenith angle. Thus there was no need to invoke spurious or anomalous absorption, provided we accounted for aerosol black carbon. The diurnal mean absorption values for altitudes between 0.5 and 3.0 km above mean sea level were observed to be 41 +/- 3 W m(-2) (1.5 K/day) in the broadband region and 8 +/- 2 W m(-2) (0.3 K/day) in the visible region. The contribution of absorbing aerosols to the heating rate was an order of magnitude larger than the contribution of CO2 and one-third that of the water vapour. In the lowest 3 km of the tropical atmosphere, aerosols accounted for more than 80% of the atmospheric absorption in the visible region. Copyright (c) 2007 Royal Meteorological Society.

Crispel, P, Roberts G.  2018.  All-sky photogrammetry techniques to georeference a cloud field. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques. 11:593-609.   10.5194/amt-11-593-2018   AbstractWebsite

In this study, we present a novel method of identifying and geolocalizing cloud field elements from a portable all-sky camera stereo network based on the ground and oriented towards zenith. The methodology is mainly based on stereophotogrammetry which is a 3-D reconstruction technique based on triangulation from corresponding stereo pixels in rectified images. In cases where clouds are horizontally separated, identifying individual positions is performed with segmentation techniques based on hue filtering and contour detection algorithms. Macroscopic cloud field characteristics such as cloud layer base heights and velocity fields are also deduced. In addition, the methodology is fitted to the context of measurement campaigns which impose simplicity of implementation, auto-calibration, and portability. Camera internal geometry models are achieved a priori in the laboratory and validated to ensure a certain accuracy in the peripheral parts of the all-sky image. Then, stereophotogrammetry with dense 3-D reconstruction is applied with cameras spaced 150m apart for two validation cases. The first validation case is carried out with cumulus clouds having a cloud base height at 1500ma. g.l. The second validation case is carried out with two cloud layers: a cumulus fractus layer with a base height at 1000ma. g.l. and an altocumulus stratiformis layer with a base height of 2300ma. g.l. Velocity fields at cloud base are computed by tracking image rectangular patterns through successive shots. The height uncertainty is estimated by comparison with a Vaisala CL31 ceilometer located on the site. The uncertainty on the horizontal coordinates and on the velocity field are theoretically quantified by using the experimental uncertainties of the cloud base height and camera orientation. In the first cumulus case, segmentation of the image is performed to identify individuals clouds in the cloud field and determine the horizontal positions of the cloud centers.

Furutani, H, Dall'osto M, Roberts GC, Prather KA.  2008.  Assessment of the relative importance of atmospheric aging on CCN activity derived from field observations. Atmospheric Environment. 42:3130-3142.   10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.024   AbstractWebsite

The effect of atmospheric aging on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of atmospheric aerosols was studied by comparing different air masses with different degrees of aging along the southern coast of California over the Pacific Ocean during a research cruise on the R/V Roger Revelle from 2-19 November 2004. Activation diameters (D(act)) were calculated using the measured CCN concentrations, condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, and particle size distributions. Measurements of single particle size and chemistry, as well as black carbon (BC) concentrations with an aethalometer, were made to provide further insight into aerosol chemistry. A gradient of aerosol concentrations was encountered: along the coast of California, the highest BC and CN concentrations (1000-6000 ng m(-3) and 2000-15,000 cm(-3)) were measured which decreased as the ship moved away from shore to much lower values (<100 ng m(-3), similar to 300 cm(-3)). In all regions, external mixtures of organic carbon, elemental carbon, sea salt, and dust aerosols frequently associated with nitrate and sulfate were observed. A correlation plot between the CCN/CN ratio and D(act) exhibits a clear linear correlation, showing a distinct relationship between the extent of anthropogenic aging and CCN activity with the most highly aged air masses showing the highest CCN activity and smallest D(act). These results show changes in aerosol chemistry due to atmospheric aging that play an important role in determining the CCN activity of atmospheric aerosols. The present study demonstrates that variations in aerosol chemistry must be taken into account in models to adequately account for the physicochemical properties of atmospheric aerosols and their CCN activity. (C) 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd.