Publications

Export 4 results:
Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year  (Desc)]
2006
Roberts, G, Mauger G, Hadley O, Ramanathan V.  2006.  North American and Asian aerosols over the eastern Pacific Ocean and their role in regulating cloud condensation nuclei. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 111   10.1029/2005jd006661   AbstractWebsite

[ 1] Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties in the Eastern Pacific Ocean were taken during an airborne experiment on the University of Wyoming's King Air during April 2004 as part of the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX). We observed a wide variety of aerosols, including those of long-range transport from Asia, clean marine boundary layer, and North American emissions. These aerosols, classified by their size distribution and history, were found in stratified layers between 500 to 7500 m above sea level and thicknesses from 100 to 3000 m. A comparison of the aerosol size distributions to measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) provides insight to the CCN activity of the different aerosol types. The overall ratio of measured to predicted CCN concentration (NCCN) is 0.56 +/- 0.41 with a relationship of N-CCN,N- measured = N-CCN, predicted(0.846 +/- 0.002) for 23 research flights and 1884 comparisons. Such a relationship does not accurately describe a CCN closure; however, it is consistent with our measurements that high CCN concentrations are more influenced by anthropogenic sources, which are less CCN active. While other CCN closures have obtained results closer to the expected 1: 1 relationship, the different aerosol types ( and presumably differences in aerosol chemistry) are responsible for the discrepancy. The measured N-CCN at 0.3% supersaturation (S-c) ranged from 20 cm(-3) (pristine) to 350 cm(-3) ( anthropogenic) with an average of 106 +/- 54 cm(-3) over the experiment. The inferred supersaturation in the clouds sampled during this experiment is similar to 0.3%. CCN concentrations of cloud-processed aerosol were well predicted using an ammonium sulfate approximation for S-c <= 0.4%. Predicted N-CCN for other aerosol types (i.e., Asian and North American aerosols) were high compared to measured values indicating a less CCN active aerosol. This study highlights the importance of chemical effects on CCN measurements and introduces a CCN activation index as a method of classifying the efficiency of an aerosol to serve as CCN relative to an ammonium sulfate particle. This index ranged from close to unity for cloud processed aerosols to as low as 0.31 for aged aerosols transported from Asia. We also compare the performance of two CCN instruments ( static thermal diffusion chamber and streamwise continuous flow chamber) on a 45 minute level leg where we observe an aged layer and a nucleation event. More than 50% of the aged aerosol served as CCN at 0.2% S-c, primarily owing to their large size, while CCN concentrations during the nucleation event were close to 0 cm(-3). CCN concentrations from both instruments agreed within instrument errors; however, the continuous flow chamber effectively captured the rapid transition in aerosol properties.

2002
Roberts, GC, Artaxo P, Zhou JC, Swietlicki E, Andreae MO.  2002.  Sensitivity of CCN spectra on chemical and physical properties of aerosol: A case study from the Amazon Basin. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 107   10.1029/2001jd000583   AbstractWebsite

Organic material, about half of which is water soluble, constitutes nearly 80% of the wet-season aerosol mass in the Amazon Basin, while soluble inorganic salts (predominantly ammonium bisulfate) represent about 15%. A detailed analysis of number distributions and the size-dependent chemical composition of the aerosol indicates that, in principle, the sulfate fraction could account for most of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity. Uncertainty about the chemical speciation of the water-soluble organic component precludes a rigorous analysis of its contribution to nucleation activity. Within reasonable assumptions, we can, however, predict a similar contribution of the organic component to CCN activity as that from sulfate. Because of the nonlinear dependence of droplet nucleation behavior on solute amount, the nucleation activity cannot be attributed uniquely to the inorganic or organic fractions. The role of water-soluble organic compounds as surfactants, however, may be significant (especially in the case of biomass-burning aerosol) and more field measurements are needed to quantify their effects on the surface tension of ambient aerosols. The parametric dependence of the CCN spectra on the physical and chemical properties of the aerosol show that the number distribution, soluble content of the aerosol, and surface tension effects all play an important role in determining CCN spectra.

2001
Roberts, GC, Andreae MO, Maenhaut W, Fernandez-Jimenez MT.  2001.  Composition and sources of aerosol in a central African rain forest during the dry season. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 106:14423-14434.   10.1029/2000jd900774   AbstractWebsite

During the Experiment for Regional Sources and Sinks of Oxidants (EXPRESSO-96), size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected in November and December 1996 at a ground site in the tropical rain forest at the N'doki National Park (NNP) in the Republic of Congo. The samples were analyzed for up to 26 elements using particle-induced X-ray emission. Elements related to mineral dust and pyrogenic aerosol exhibited greater concentrations during the daytime, while aerosol produced by the rain forest exhibited higher concentrations at night. Samples were also collected at two levels on the tower, above and below the canopy, to characterize vegetation sources. Absolute principal component analysis (APCA) identified three major aerosol source types in each size fraction, which explained more than 90% of the data variance. The fine-size fraction contained mineral dust (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe), pyrogenic (black carbon, K, and Zn), and marine/anthropogenic sulfur components. The coarse-size fraction included a mineral dust (Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) and two primary biogenic components consisting of K, P, Zn, and S. Absolute principal component scores were calculated for the components of APCA, and temporal trends were compared to 7 day isopycnic backward trajectories. Consistent relationships between the temporal trends of the fine fraction aerosol components and meteorological patterns were observed. Trade wind air masses transported biomass burning and mineral dust aerosol to NNP during the first half of the experiment. The fine fraction sulfur component correlated well with the pyrogenic activity before the change in meteorological patterns halfway through the experiment. The fine and coarse sulfur concentrations nearly doubled in the latter part of the experiment as a monsoon circulation brought sulfur-enriched aerosol from the Atlantic Ocean. Various industrial activities on the coast of Cameroon and Gabon probably contributed to the high sulfur concentrations as well.

2000
Kubatova, A, Vermeylen R, Claeys M, Cafmeyer J, Maenhaut W, Roberts G, Artaxo P.  2000.  Carbonaceous aerosol characterization in the Amazon basin, Brazil: novel dicarboxylic acids and related compounds. Atmospheric Environment. 34:5037-5051.   10.1016/s1352-2310(00)00320-4   AbstractWebsite

High-resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS) were employed for the quantitative determination of dichloromethane-extractable organic compounds in total and size-fractionated aerosol samples which were collected in the Amazon basin, Brazil, during the wet season, as part of the LBA-CLAIRE-98 experiment. Special emphasis was placed on the characterization and identification of several novel unknown dicarboxylic acids and related oxidative degradation products. This class of acidic products was enriched in the fine size fraction, suggesting that they were secondary organic aerosol products formed by gas-to-particle conversion. Some of the unknowns contributed more to the class of dicarboxylic acids than the major known compound, nonadioic acid (azelaic acid). The same unknowns were also observed in urban aerosol samples collected on hot summer days in Gent, Belgium. For the characterization and structure elucidation of the unknowns, various types of derivatizations and Fractionation by solid-phase extraction were employed in combination with GC/MS. Four unknowns were identified. The most abundant were two derivatives of glutaric acid, 3-isopropyl pentanedioic acid and 3-acetyl pentanedioic acid. The other two identified unknowns were another oxo homologue, 3-acetyl hexanedioic acid, and, interestingly, 3-carboxy heptanedioic acid. To our knowledge, the occurrence of these four compounds in atmospheric aerosols has not yet been reported. The biogenic precursors of the novel identified compounds could not be pinpointed. but most likely include monoterpenes and fatty acids. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.