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Martin, ST, Andreae MO, Artaxo P, Baumgardner D, Chen Q, Goldstein AH, Guenther A, Heald CL, Mayol-Bracero OL, McMurry PH, Pauliquevis T, Poschl U, Prather KA, Roberts GC, Saleska SR, Dias MAS, Spracklen DV, Swietlicki E, Trebs I.  2010.  Sources and properties of Amazonian aerosol particles. Reviews of Geophysics. 48   10.1029/2008rg000280   AbstractWebsite

This review provides a comprehensive account of what is known presently about Amazonian aerosol particles and concludes by formulating outlook and priorities for further research. The review is organized to follow the life cycle of Amazonian aerosol particles. It begins with a discussion of the primary and secondary sources relevant to the Amazonian particle burden, followed by a presentation of the particle properties that characterize the mixed populations present over the Amazon Basin at different times and places. These properties include number and mass concentrations and distributions, chemical composition, hygroscopicity, and cloud nucleation ability. The review presents Amazonian aerosol particles in the context of natural compared to anthropogenic sources as well as variability with season and meteorology. This review is intended to facilitate an understanding of the current state of knowledge on Amazonian aerosol particles specifically and tropical continental aerosol particles in general and thereby to enhance future research in this area.

Mayol-Bracero, OL, Guyon P, Graham B, Roberts G, Andreae MO, Decesari S, Facchini MC, Fuzzi S, Artaxo P.  2002.  Water-soluble organic compounds in biomass burning aerosols over Amazonia - 2. Apportionment of the chemical composition and importance of the polyacidic fraction. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 107   10.1029/2001jd000522   AbstractWebsite

Chemical characterization was performed on carbonaceous aerosols from Rondonia in the Brazilian Amazon region as part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH). The sampling period (October 1999) included the peak of the burning season as well as the dry-to-wet season transition. Characterization of the carbonaceous material was performed by using a thermal combustion method. This enabled determination of aerosol total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and organic carbon (OC). A significant fraction of the BC material (on average about 50%) seemed to be highly refractory organic material soluble in water. A more detailed analysis of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) fraction of the TC was undertaken, involving measurements of WSOC content, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation (with UV detection) of the water-soluble components, and characterization of individual components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The WSOC fraction accounted for 45-75% of the OC. This high WSOC fraction suggests an aerosol derived mainly from smoldering combustion. Using GC/MS, many different compounds, containing hydroxy, carboxylate, and carbonyl groups, were detected. The fraction of the WSOC identified by GC/MS was about 10%. Three classes of compounds were separated by HPLC/UV: neutral compounds (N), monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids (MDA), and polycarboxylic acids (PA). The sum of these three groups accounted for about 70% of the WSOC, with MDA and PA being most abundant (about 50%). Good correlations (r(2) between 0.84 and 0.99) of BCwater (BC after water extraction) and levoglucosan (both indicators of biomass combustion) with the water-soluble species (i.e., WSOC, N, MDA, and PA), and their increase in concentrations during the burning period provided strong evidence that biomass burning is a major source of the WSOC. Particularly interesting is that PA and therefore, probably, humic-like substances (due to their polyacidic nature) are generated in significant amounts during biomass burning. These substances, due to their water solubility and surface tension-lowering effects, may play an important role in determining the overall cloud condensation nuclei activity of biomass burning aerosols and, consequently, could be important in cloud processes and climate forcing.

Modini, RL, Frossard AA, Ahlm L, Russell LM, Corrigan CE, Roberts GC, Hawkins LN, Schroder JC, Bertram AK, Zhao R, Lee AKY, Abbatt JPD, Lin J, Nenes A, Wang Z, Wonaschutz A, Sorooshian A, Noone KJ, Jonsson H, Seinfeld JH, Toom-Sauntry D, Macdonald AM, Leaitch WR.  2015.  Primary marine aerosol-cloud interactions off the coast of California. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 120:4282-4303.   10.1002/2014jd022963   AbstractWebsite

Primary marine aerosol (PMA)-cloud interactions off the coast of California were investigated using observations of marine aerosol, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and stratocumulus clouds during the Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies. Based on recently reported measurements of PMA size distributions, a constrained lognormal-mode-fitting procedure was devised to isolate PMA number size distributions from total aerosol size distributions and applied to E-PEACE measurements. During the 12 day E-PEACE cruise on the R/V Point Sur, PMA typically contributed less than 15% of total particle concentrations. PMA number concentrations averaged 12 cm(-3) during a relatively calmer period (average wind speed 12m/s(1)) lasting 8 days, and 71cm(-3) during a period of higher wind speeds (average 16m/s(1)) lasting 5 days. On average, PMA contributed less than 10% of total CCN at supersaturations up to 0.9% during the calmer period; however, during the higher wind speed period, PMA comprised 5-63% of CCN (average 16-28%) at supersaturations less than 0.3%. Sea salt was measured directly in the dried residuals of cloud droplets during the SOLEDAD study. The mass fractions of sea salt in the residuals averaged 12 to 24% during three cloud events. Comparing the marine stratocumulus clouds sampled in the two campaigns, measured peak supersaturations were 0.20.04% during E-PEACE and 0.05-0.1% during SOLEDAD. The available measurements show that cloud droplet number concentrations increased with >100 nm particles in E-PEACE but decreased in the three SOLEDAD cloud events.

Moore, MJK, Furutani H, Roberts GC, Moffet RC, Gilles MK, Palenik B, Prather KA.  2011.  Effect of organic compounds on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of sea spray aerosol produced by bubble bursting. Atmospheric Environment. 45:7462-7469.   10.1016/j.atmosenv.2011.04.034   AbstractWebsite

The ocean comprises over 70% of the surface of the earth and thus sea spray aerosols generated by wave processes represent a critical component of our climate system. The manner in which different complex oceanic mixtures of organic species and inorganic salts are distributed between individual particles in sea spray directly determines which particles will effectively form cloud nuclei. Controlled laboratory experiments were undertaken to better understand the full range of particle properties produced by bubbling solutions composed of simplistic model organic species, oleic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), mixed with NaCl to more complex artificial seawater mixed with complex organic mixtures produced by common oceanic microorganisms. Simple mixtures of NaCl and oleic acid or SDS had a significant effect on CCN activity, even in relatively small amounts. However, an artificial seawater (ASW) solution containing microorganisms, the common cyanobacteria (Synechococcus) and DMS-producing green algae (Ostreococcus), produced particles containing similar to 34 times more carbon than the particles produced from pure ASW, yet no significant change was observed in the overall CCN activity. We hypothesize that these microorganisms produce diverse mixtures of organic species with a wide range of properties that produced offsetting effects, leading to no net change in the overall average measured hygroscopicity of the collection of sea spray particles. Based on these observations, changes in CCN activity due to "bloom" conditions would be predicted to lead to small changes in the average CCN activity, and thus have a negligible impact on cloud formation. However, each sea spray particle will contain a broad spectrum of different species, and thus further studies are needed of the CCN activity of individual sea spray particles and biological processes under a wide range of controllable conditions. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.