Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE)

Citation:
Russell, LM, Sorooshian A, Seinfeld JH, Albrecht BA, Nenes A, Ahlm L, Chen Y-C, Coggon M, Craven JS, Flagan RC, Frossard AA, Jonsson H, Jung E, Lin JJ, Metcalf AR, Modini R, Mülmenstädt J, Roberts GC, Shingler T, Song S, Wang Z, Wonaschütz A.  2012.  Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. : American Meteorological Society

Abstract:

Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future radiative forcing due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled predictions of climate are the gaps in our fundamental understanding of cloud processes. There has been significant progress with both observations and models on addressing these important questions, but quantifying them correctly is nontrivial thus limiting our ability to represent them in global climate models. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) 2011 was a targeted aircraft campaign with embedded modeling studies, using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and the Research Vessel Point Sur in July and August 2011 off the central coast of California, with a full payload of instruments to measure particle and cloud number, mass, composition, and water uptake distributions. E-PEACE used three emitted particle sources to separate particle-induced feedbacks from dynamical variability, namely (i) shipboard smoke-generated particles with 0.05–1 μm diameters (which produced tracks measured by satellite and had drop composition characteristic of organic smoke), (ii) combustion particles from container ships with 0.05–0.2 μm diameters (which were measured in a variety of conditions with droplets containing both organic and sulfate components), and (iii) aircraft-based milled salt particles with 3–5 μm diameters (which showed enhanced drizzle rates in some clouds). The aircraft observations were consistent with past large eddy simulations of deeper clouds in ship tracks and aerosol-cloud parcel modeling of cloud drop number and composition, providing quantitative constraints on aerosol effects on warm cloud microphysics.

Notes:

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DOI:

10.1175/BAMS-D-12-00015