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Kilb, D, Keen CS, Newman RL, Kent GM, Sandwell DT, Vernon FL, Johnson CL, Orcutt JA.  2003.  The Visualization Center at Scripps Institution of Oceanography: Education and Outreach. Seismological Research Letters. 74:641-648. AbstractWebsite

The immersive environment of the Visualization Center at Scripps, coupled with the presentation of current seismological research, has great education and outreach potential. Since its March 2002 opening, the Visualization Center at Scripps has had more than 2,500 visitors, and numerous virtual visitors have explored our Web pages, which include streaming QuickTime movies of geophysical data, tutorials on how to use SGI/Mac/Windows registered visualization software, and examples of visualizations developed by SIO researchers and faculty members (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/library.shtml). We will continue to expand the use of the Visualization Center at Scripps for K-12 and informal education, and to use the center to supply geophysical data sets, movies, and research results to as large a group of educators as possible. Our goal is to develop more sustained K-12 educational programs and to generate assessments of the center's programs and the educational products created at the Center.

Howell, S, Smith-Konter B, Frazer N, Tong XP, Sandwell D.  2016.  The vertical fingerprint of earthquake cycle loading in southern California. Nature Geoscience. 9:611-+.   10.1038/ngeo2741   AbstractWebsite

The San Andreas Fault System, one of the best-studied transform plate boundaries on Earth, is well known for its complex network of locked faults that slowly deform the crust in response to large-scale plate motions(1-8). Horizontal interseismic motions of the fault system are largely predictable, but vertical motions arising from tectonic sources remain enigmatic. Here we show that when carefully treated for spatial consistency, global positioning system-derived vertical velocities expose a small-amplitude (+/- 2mmyr(-1)), but spatially considerable (200 km), coherent pattern of uplift and subsidence straddling the fault system in southern California. We employ the statistical method of model selection to isolate this vertical velocity field fromnon-tectonic signals that induce velocity variations in both magnitude and direction across small distances (less than tens of kilometres; ref. 9), and find remarkable agreement with the sense of vertical motions predicted by physical earthquake cycle models spanning the past few centuries(6,10). We suggest that these motions reveal the subtle, but identifiable, tectonic fingerprint of far-field flexure due to more than 300 years of fault locking and creeping depth variability. Understanding this critical component of interseismic deformation at a complex strike-slip plate boundary will better constrain regional mechanics and crustal rheology, improving the quantification of seismic hazards in southern California and beyond.

Smith-Konter, BR, Thornton GM, Sandwell DT.  2014.  Vertical crustal displacement due to interseismic deformation along the San Andreas fault: Constraints from tide gauges. Geophysical Research Letters. 41:3793-3801.   10.1002/2014gl060091   AbstractWebsite

Interseismic motion along complex strike-slip fault systems such as the San Andreas Fault System (SAFS) can produce vertical velocities that are similar to 10 times smaller than horizontal velocities, caused by along-strike variations in fault orientation and locking depth. Tide gauge stations provide a long (50-100 year) recording history of sea level change due to several oceanographic and geologic processes, including vertical earthquake cycle deformation. Here we compare relative sea level displacements with predictions from a 3-D elastic/viscoelastic earthquake cycle model of the SAFS. We find that models with lithospheric structure reflecting a thick elastic plate (> 50km) and moderate viscosities produce vertical motions in surprisingly good agreement with the relative tide gauge uplift rates. These results suggest that sea level variations along the California coastline contain a small but identifiable tectonic signal reflecting the flexure of the elastic plate caused by bending moments applied at the ends of locked faults.

Shum, CK, Werner RA, Sandwell DT, Zhang BH, Nerem RS, Tapley BD.  1990.  Variations of Global Mesoscale Eddy Energy Observed from GEOSAT. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 95:17865-&.   10.1029/JC095iC10p17865   AbstractWebsite

The global distribution of eddy kinetic energy has been synoptically observed from analysis of the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) altimeter data collected for a 2-year period from November 1986 through November 1988. Using a technique developed by Sandwell and Zhang (1989), altimeter data from forty-four 17-day repeat cycles (2 years) were processed into sea surface slopes along the satellite ground track, averaged, and filtered to produce a mean sea surface slope profile having an estimated accuracy of 0.2 ╬╝rad (2 cm sea level change over 100 km distance). A series of global eddy kinetic energy maps, each averaged over 3 months, and their mean were then generated. The maximum mean eddy kinetic energy per unit mass exceeds 2000 cm^2/s^2 for most of the western boundary currents; however, it only reaches approximately 500 cm^2/s^2 for the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). More than 65% of the world ocean has relatively low variability with an eddy kinetic energy of less than 300 cm^2/s^2. Results obtained from this study are in general agreement with other Geosat ocean variability studies (e.g., Zlotnicki et al., 1989). However, significantly higher variability is found when compared with either Seasat or ship drift data. Significant seasonal variations were found in the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio currents. The ACC system exhibits no apparent seasonal variation.