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Price, EJ, Sandwell DT.  1998.  Small-scale deformations associated with the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake mapped by synthetic aperture radar interferometry phase gradients. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 103:27001-27016.   10.1029/98jb01821   AbstractWebsite

The Landers earthquake (M-w 7.3) occurred on June 28, 1992, and ruptured nearly 100 km of previously mapped and unmapped faults in the Mojave Desert. We use synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) to examine the cumulative surface deformation between April 24 and August 7, 1992, in a 100 x 100 km region surrounding the northern portion of the earthquake rupture. Also, we introduce a technique for manipulating SAR interferograms to extract short-wavelength displacement information. This technique involves computation and subsequent combination of interferometric phase gradient maps. The InSAR results show significant deformation signatures associated with faults, fractures, dry lake beds, and mountainous regions within 75-100 km of the main rupture. Using the phase gradient method, we are able to extract small-scale deformation patterns near the main rupture. Many of the preexisting, mapped faults within 50 km of the main rupture experienced triggered slip; these include the Old Woman, Lenwood, Johnson Valley, West Calico, and Calico Faults. The InSAR results also indicate right-lateral offsets along secondary fractures trending N-NE within the left-lateral zone of shear between the main rupture and the Johnson Valley Fault. Additionally, there are interesting interferogram fringe signatures surrounding Troy Dry Lake and Coyote Dry Lake that are related to deformation of dry lake beds.

Phipps Morgan, J, Sandwell DT.  1994.  Systematics of Ridge Propagation South of 30-Degrees-S. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 121:245-258.   10.1016/0012-821X(94)90043-4   AbstractWebsite

New high-resolution Geosat altimetry data south of 30 degrees S reveal numerous propagating ridge wakes along intermediate- and slow-spreading ridges. These new examples provide a large enough database to establish systematics of ridge propagation. Almost all active propagating ridges propagate down a regional along-axis gravity or bathymetry gradient. The sense of the propagating ridge offset (right lateral vs, left lateral) is related to recent changes in spreading direction. We find there is a significant difference between the propagation of ridges with an axial high morphology which propagate at greater than similar to 50% of their full-spreading rate and ridges with a median valley morphology which usually propagate at similar to 25% of their spreading rate. The axial high propagators leave behind an asymmetric wake; the outer pseudofault appears as a continuous linear trough/step while the sheared zone appears as a chain of small gravity bumps. While we clearly see the propagating ridge wakes from offsets greater than similar to 10 km at slow- and intermediate-spreading ridges, at ridges spreading faster than similar to 75 mm/yr the amplitude of the wake topography decreases to the point where we no longer see these wakes in Geosat altimetry data. The systematics seen in this new data set support a fracture mechanics model for the dynamics of ridge propagation.

Phiilips, RJ, Johnson CL, Mackwell SJ, Morgan P, Sandwell DT, Zuber MT.  1997.  Lithospheric Mechanics and Dynamics of Venus. Venus II--geology, geophysics, atmosphere, and solar wind environment. ( Bougher SW, Hunten DM, Phillips RJ, Eds.)., Tucson, Ariz.: University of Arizona Press Abstract
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