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Douglas, BC, Agreen RW, Sandwell DT.  1984.  Observing Global Ocean Circulation with Seasat Altimeter Data. Marine Geodesy. 8:67-83. AbstractWebsite
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Detrick, RS, Von Herzen RP, Parsons B, Sandwell D, Dougherty M.  1986.  Heat-Flow Observations on the Bermuda Rise and Thermal Models of Midplate Swells. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets. 91:3701-3723.   10.1029/JB091iB03p03701   AbstractWebsite

The Bermuda Rise is a broad topographic swell which is apparent in both residual depth and geoid anomaly maps of the western North Atlantic. The magnitudes of the depth and geoid anomalies associated with the Bermuda Rise are similar to the anomalies associated with other swells surrounding recent volcanic islands (e.g., Hawaii), suggesting that despite the lack of recent volcanism on Bermuda, the rise has a similar origin to other midplate swells. Results are reported from 171 new heat flow measurements at seven carefully selected sites on the Bermuda Rise and the surrounding seafloor. Off the Bermuda Rise the basement depths are generally shallower and the heat flow higher than either the plate or boundary layer models predict, with the measured heat flow apparently reaching a uniform value of about 50 mW m−2 on 120 m.y. old crust. On the Bermuda Rise the heat flow is significantly higher (57.4±2.6 mW m−2) than off the swell (49.5±1.7 mW m−2). The magnitude of the anomalous heat flux (8–10 mW m−2) is comparable to that previously found along the older portion of the Hawaiian Swell near Midway. The existence of higher heat flow on both the Hawaiian Swell and Bermuda Rise indicates that these features fundamentally have a thermal origin. The differences in the shape, uplift, and subsidence histories of the Hawaiian Swell and Bermuda Rise can be quantitatively explained by the different absolute velocities of the Pacific and North American plates moving across a distributed heat source in the underlying mantle. Two-dimensional numerical convection models indicate that the observed depth, geoid, and heat flow anomalies are consistent with simple convection models in which the lower part of the thermally defined plate acts as the upper thermal boundary layer of the convection.

DeSanto, JB, Sandwell DT, Chadwell CD.  2016.  Seafloor geodesy from repeated sidescan sonar surveys. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 121:4800-4813.   10.1002/2016jb013025   AbstractWebsite

Accurate seafloor geodetic methods are critical to the study of marine natural hazards such as megathrust earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes. We propose digital image correlation of repeated shipboard sidescan sonar surveys as a measurement of seafloor deformation. We test this method using multibeam surveys collected in two locales: 2500m deep lightly sedimented seafloor on the flank of a spreading ridge and 4300m deep heavily sedimented seafloor far from any plate boundary. Correlation of these surveys are able to recover synthetic displacements in the across-track (range) direction accurate to within 1m and in the along-track (azimuth) direction accurate to within 1-10m. We attribute these accuracies to the inherent resolution of sidescan data being better in the range dimension than the azimuth dimension. These measurements are primarily limited by the accuracy of the ship navigation. Dual-frequency GPS units are accurate to approximate to 10cm, but single-frequency GPS units drift on the order of 1m/h and are insufficient for geodetic application.

DeSanto, JB, Chadwell CD, Sandwell DT.  2019.  Kinematic post-processing of ship navigation data using precise point positioning. Journal of Navigation. 72:795-804.   10.1017/s0373463318000887   AbstractWebsite

Seafloor geodetic studies such as Global Positioning System (GPS)-Acoustic experiments often require the measurement platform on the sea surface to be positioned accurately to within a few centimetres. In this paper, we test the utility of Precise Point Positioning (PPP) for this application with two experiments. The first fixed platform experiment is a comparison between three independent processing software packages: Positioning and Navigation Data Analyst (PANDA), Global Navigation Satellite System-Inferred Positioning System and Orbit Analysis Simulation Software (GIPSY-OASIS), and the Canadian Spatial Reference System (CSRS)) and a more accurate solution based on conventional differential processing of a remote GPS station in the Aleutian Islands. The second moving platform experiment is a comparison among the three PPP software packages using 40 hours of ship navigation data collected during the Roger Revelle RR1605 cruise 170 nautical miles southwest of Palau in May 2016. We found the PPP solutions were repeatable to 5 center dot 49 cm in the horizontal components and 12 center dot 4 cm in the vertical component. This demonstrates not only that PPP is a useful tool for positioning marine platforms in remote locations, but also that modern ship navigation instruments such as the Kongsberg Seapath 330 + are suitable for seafloor geodetic application.