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Scott, RC, Lubin D, Vogelmann AM, Kato S.  2017.  West Antarctic Ice Sheet Cloud Cover and Surface Radiation Budget from NASA A-Train Satellites. Journal of Climate. 30:6151-6170.   10.1175/jcli-d-16-0644.1   AbstractWebsite

Clouds are an essential parameter of the surface energy budget influencing the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) response to atmospheric warming and net contribution to global sea level rise. A 4-yr record of NASA A-Train cloud observations is combined with surface radiation measurements to quantify the WAIS radiation budget and constrain the three-dimensional occurrence frequency, thermodynamic phase partitioning, and surface radiative effect of clouds over West Antarctica (WA). The skill of satellite-modeled radiative fluxes is confirmed through evaluation against measurements at four Antarctic sites (WAIS Divide ice camp and Neumayer, Syowa, and Concordia stations). Owing to perennial high-albedo snow and ice cover, cloud infrared emission dominates over cloud solar reflection and absorption leading to a positive net all-wave cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface, with all monthly means and 99.15% of instantaneous CRE values exceeding zero. The annual-mean CRE at the WAIS surface is 34 W m−2, representing a significant cloud-induced warming of the ice sheet. Low-level liquid-containing clouds, including thin liquid water clouds implicated in radiative contributions to surface melting, are widespread and most frequent in WA during the austral summer. In summer, clouds warm the WAIS by 26 W m−2, on average, despite maximum offsetting shortwave CRE. Glaciated cloud systems are strongly linked to orographic forcing, with maximum incidence on the WAIS continuing downstream along the Transantarctic Mountains.

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Lubin, D, Kahn BH, Lazzara MA, Rowe P, Walden V.  2015.  Variability in AIRS-retrieved cloud amount and thermodynamic phase over west versus east Antarctica influenced by the SAM. Geophysical Research Letters. 42:1259-1267.   10.1002/2014gl062285   AbstractWebsite

In a sample of summertime cloud retrievals from the NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), a positive Southern Annular Mode (SAM) index polarity is associated with greater cloud frequency and larger effective cloud fraction over West Antarctica compared with a negative SAM index polarity. The opposite result appears over the high East Antarctic Plateau. Comparing AIRS-retrieved cloud fraction with Antarctic Automatic Weather Station 2 m air temperature data, a positive and significant correlation is found over most of West Antarctica, signifying a longwave heating effect of clouds. Over East Antarctica correlations between Sun elevation and 2 m air temperature are strongest, consistent with lower cloud amount.

Lubin, D, Vogelmann A, Lehr PJ, Kressin A, Ehramjian J, Ramanathan V.  2000.  Validation of visible/near-IR atmospheric absorption and solar emission spectroscopic models at 1 cm-1 resolution. Journal of Geophysical Research. 105:22445–22454.   10.1029/2000JD900317   Abstract

A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, operating at 1 cm-1 resolution between 9000 and 24,669 cm-1 (0.405-1.111 μm) has been used to check the spectral composition of databases that form the basis for most atmospheric absorption parameterizations used in climate models, remote sensing, and other radiative transfer simulations. The spectrometer, operating near sea level under clear skies, obtained relative atmospheric transmission measurements of the direct solar beam by means of a heliostat. The spectroscopic data were compared with a line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) calculation of direct solar beam flux, which used a input data a monochromatic model extraterrestrial solar flux spectrum currently in common use. This intercomparison revealed that the extraterrestrial solar flux spectrum contains 266 solar absorption features that do not appear in the data, resulting in an excess of approximately 1.92 W m-2 in the model's solar constant. The intercomparison also revealed 97 absorption features in the data that do not appear in the HITRAN-96 database as used by LBLRTM, resulting in a model underestimate of shortwave absorption of ˜0.23 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 42°. These small discrepancies revealed by the intercomparison indicate that current extraterrestrial solar irradiance models and spectroscopic databases used by shortwave atmospheric radiative transfer models are nearly entirely complete for purposes of atmospheric energy budget calculation. Thus clear or cloudy sky `excess absorption' is unlikely to be related to an incomplete identification of atmospheric absorbing gases and their spectroscopic features, at 1 cm-1 resolution, for a clean troposphere of normal composition.

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Lubin, D, Weber PG.  1995.  The Use of Cloud Reflectance Functions with Satellite Data for Surface Radiation Budget Estimation. Journal of Applied Meteorology. 34:1333-1347.   10.1175/1520-0450(1995)034<1333:tuocrf>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an overcast atmosphere above an ocean surface has been calculated as a function of wavelength using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model. This plane-parallel BRDF appears qualitatively similar to the empirically derived angular dependence models from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. But when these two different BRDFs are used to estimate net shortwave flux at the ocean surface, discrepancies of 20-60 W m(-2) can occur between the respective net surface nux estimations. When using either BRDF with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data for surface radiation budget estimation, this uncertainty can be minimized by restricting the satellite viewing( polar) angle to between 30 degrees and 50 degrees. Accurate measurements of the planetary BRDF would help resolve these differences.

Scott, RC, Lubin D.  2016.  Unique manifestations of mixed-phase cloud microphysics over Ross Island and the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Geophysical Research Letters. 43:2936-2945.   10.1002/2015gl067246   AbstractWebsite

Spaceborne radar and lidar observations from the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites are used to compare seasonal variations in the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds over Ross Island, Antarctica, with two contrasting Arctic atmospheric observatories located in Barrow, Alaska, and Summit, Greenland. At Ross Island, downstream from recurrent intrusions of marine air over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and eastern Ross Ice Shelf, clouds exhibit a tendency toward the greatest geometrical thickness and coldest temperatures in summer, the largest average ice water content, IWC, at low altitude during summer and autumn, the most abundant IWC at cold mixed-phase temperatures (-40 degrees C

Holmhansen, O, Helbling EW, Lubin D.  1993.  Ultraviolet-Radiation in Antarctica - Inhibition of Primary Production. Photochemistry and Photobiology. 58:567-570.   10.1111/j.1751-1097.1993.tb04933.x   AbstractWebsite

With the seasonal formation of the ozone hole over Antarctica, there is much concern regarding the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) on the marine ecosystem in the Southern Ocean. In situ incubations of natural phytoplankton assemblages in antarctic waters indicate that under normal ozone conditions UV-B radiation is responsible for a loss of approximately 4.9% of primary production in the euphotic zone, whereas UV radiation with wavelengths between 320 and 360 nm causes a loss of approximately 6.2%. When combined with data on the action spectrum for photoinhibition by UV radiation, our data suggest that the enhanced fluence of UV-B radiation under a well-developed ozone hole (1 50 Dobson units) would decrease daily primary productivity by an additional amount of less-than-or-equal-to 53.8%. Calculations that take into consideration the extent and duration of low stratospheric ozone concentrations during September to November indicate that the decrease in total annual primary production in antarctic waters due to enhanced UV-B radiation would be less-than-or-equal-to 0.20%.

Lubin, D, Frederick JE.  1991.  The Ultraviolet-Radiation Environment of the Antarctic Peninsula - the Roles of Ozone and Cloud Cover. Journal of Applied Meteorology. 30:478-493.   10.1175/1520-0450(1991)030<0478:tureot>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The National Science Foundation scanning spectroradiometer at Palmer Station, Antarctica (64-degrees-46'S, 64-degrees-04'W) provides hourly ground-based measurements of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the earth's surface. These measurements define the UV radiation environment of the region and, in conjunction with a daily record of sky conditions and radiative transfer modeling, permit a quantitative understanding of the role of cloud cover in regulating UV radiation levels at the Antarctic surface, including the period of the springtime ozone depletion. The transmission properties of cloud types over the Antarctic Peninsula are quantified by taking the ratio of UV-A irradiances measured under them to UV-A irradiances calculated for clear skies and the same solar zenith angle, and the results are then generalized to the UV-B. Under the average overcast sky in the region, UV irradiance at all wavelengths is slightly greater than half of the value for clear skies. Under the thickest overcast layers, UV irradiance at all wavelengths is roughly 20% what it would be if the sky were clear. In a seasonally averaged sense cloudiness has no effect on the percentage enhancement in UV-B surface irradiance that results from the springtime ozone depletion. However, when considering time scales of hours to several days, an increase in cloud cover can be discussed in terms of its ability to attenuate the solar irradiance; in some cases giving a surface UV-B level comparable to that found under an unperturbed ozone column and clear skies. Depending on the amount of ozone depletion and the type of cloud cover, there will always be a wavelength below which surface radiation levels are excessive during spring.

Lubin, D, Frederick JE, Krueger AJ.  1989.  The Ultraviolet-Radiation Environment of Antarctica - Mcmurdo Station During September-October 1987. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 94:8491-8496.   10.1029/JD094iD06p08491   AbstractWebsite

The large depletions in column ozone observed over Antarctica during spring imply enhanced levels of solar ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface. Daily data from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer were combined with a model of atmospheric radiative transfer to compute the time evolution of ultraviolet irradiance, at wavelengths from 290 to 350 nm, incident on McMurdo Station during September-October 1987. Large changes in column ozone occur as the polar vortex moves over the site. This is accompanied by correspondingly large variations in ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface. At a wavelength near 305 nm, the irradiance in early October exceeds values appropriate to an unperturbed ozone layer by a factor of 5–6. As December 21 approaches, the noontime ultraviolet irradiance increases, irrespective of changes in ozone. Any lengthening of the period of ozone depletion toward summer solstice will have a substantial impact on the ultraviolet irradiance received by the Antarctic surface.

Lubin, D, Morrow E.  2001.  Ultraviolet radiation environment of Antarctica 1. Effect of sea ice on top-of-atmosphere albedo and on satellite retrievals. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 106:33453-33461.   10.1029/2001jd000687   AbstractWebsite

The backscattered ultraviolet radiance measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) over the Southern Ocean is influenced by both cloud cover and sea ice concentration. In TOMS data alone, these influences cannot be separated. To assess the relative importance of cloud opacity and sea ice concentration, TOMS level 2 data are colocated with AVHRR and SSM/I data. AVHRR provides independent cloud identification at a spatial resolution sufficient to estimate cloud fraction within a TOMS level 2 footprint, while the SSM/I provides useful estimates of sea ice concentration over clear and cloudy scenes. The sea ice cover is shown to have a stronger influence than cloud cover on the backscattered ultraviolet radiance at the top of the atmosphere. Over overcast scenes the mean TOMS reflectivity increases from 45 to 84% as the underlying sea ice concentration increases from 0 to 1. Over scenes containing sea ice concentrations greater than 0.5, the increase in TOMS-measured radiance with increasing cloud amount (0-1) is generally less than 30% and is negligible over high sea ice concentrations. Over clear-sky scenes the characteristic UV-A albedos of the sea ice components of the scenes are retrieved from the TOMS data. These albedos range from 0.19 +/- 0.14 for sea ice concentration 0.1, increasing rapidly to 0.53 +/- 0.15 for sea ice concentration 0.3, and then approximately linearly to 0.80 +/- 0.11 for sea ice concentration 1.0. There is the potential to develop a climatology of surface ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation for southern high latitudes, which utilizes a combination of TOMS and SSM/I data. Such a climatology could cover the entire Southern Ocean throughout the duration of the modern springtime ozone depletion phenomenon. Analysis of uncertainties related to sea ice concentration retrieval from SSM/I, and related uncertainties in surface albedo identification and their influence on the estimated surface radiative flux, shows that such a climatology would have the most quantitative value for sea ice concentrations less than 0.5.

Lubin, D, Holm-Hansen O, Helbling EW.  1993.  Ultraviolet radiation and its effects on organisms in aquatic environments. Environmental UV photobiology. ( Young AR, Ed.).:379-345., New York: Plenum Press Abstract
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Lubin, D, Melis C, Tytler D.  2018.  Ultraviolet flux decrease under a grand minimum from IUE short-wavelength observation of solar analogs. Astrophysical Journal Letters. 852   10.3847/2041-8213/aaa124   AbstractWebsite

We have identified a sample of 33 Sun-like stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) with the short-wavelength spectrographs that have ground-based detections of chromospheric Ca II H+K activity. Our objective is to determine if these observations can provide an estimate of the decrease in ultraviolet (UV) surface flux associated with a transition from a normal stellar cycle to a grand-minimum state. The activity detections, corrected to solar metallicity, span the range -5.16 < log R'(HK) < -4.26, and eight stars have log R'(HK) < -5.00. The IUE-observed flux spectra are integrated over the wavelength range 1250-1910 A, transformed to surface fluxes, and then normalized to solar B - V. These normalized surface fluxes show a strong linear relationship with activity R'(HK) (R-2 = 0.857 after three outliers are omitted). From this linear regression we estimate a range in UV flux of 9.3% over solar cycle 22 and a reduction of 6.9% below solar cycle minimum under a grand minimum. The 95% confidence interval in this grand-minimum estimate is 5.5%-8.4%. An alternative estimate is provided by the IUE observations of tau Cet (HD 10700), a star having strong evidence of being in a grand-minimum state, and this star's normalized surface flux is 23.0 +/- 5.7% lower than solar cycle minimum.

Aagaard, K, Barrie L, Carmack E, Garrity C, Jones EP, Lubin D, Macdonald RW, Swift JH, Tucker W, Wheeler PA, Whritner R.  1996.  U.S., Canadian researchers explore Arctic Ocean. EOS, Transactions American Geophysical Union. 77:209,213.   10.1029/96EO00141   Abstract

During July–September 1994, two Canadian and U.S. ice breakers crossed the Arctic Ocean (Figure 1) to investigate the biological, chemical, and physical systems that define the role of the Arctic in global change. The results are changing our perceptions of the Arctic Ocean as a static environment with low biological productivity to a dynamic and productive system. The experiment was called the Arctic Ocean Section (AOS) and the ships were the Canadian Coast Guard ship Louis S. St.-Laurent and the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Polar Sea.

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Bromwich, DH, Nicolas JP, Hines KM, Kay JE, Key EL, Lazzara MA, Lubin D, McFarquhar GM, Gorodetskaya IV, Grosvenor DP, Lachlan-Cope T, van Lipzig NPM.  2012.  Tropospheric clouds in Antarctica. Reviews of Geophysics. 50   10.1029/2011rg000363   AbstractWebsite

Compared to other regions, little is known about clouds in Antarctica. This arises in part from the challenging deployment of instrumentation in this remote and harsh environment and from the limitations of traditional satellite passive remote sensing over the polar regions. Yet clouds have a critical influence on the ice sheet's radiation budget and its surface mass balance. The extremely low temperatures, absolute humidity levels, and aerosol concentrations found in Antarctica create unique conditions for cloud formation that greatly differ from those encountered in other regions, including the Arctic. During the first decade of the 21st century, new results from field studies, the advent of cloud observations from spaceborne active sensors, and improvements in cloud parameterizations in numerical models have contributed to significant advances in our understanding of Antarctic clouds. This review covers four main topics: (1) observational methods and instruments, (2) the seasonal and interannual variability of cloud amounts, (3) the microphysical properties of clouds and aerosols, and (4) cloud representation in global and regional numerical models. Aside from a synthesis of the existing literature, novel insights are also presented. A new climatology of clouds over Antarctica and the Southern Ocean is derived from combined measurements of the CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellites. This climatology is used to assess the forecast cloud amounts in 20th century global climate model simulations. While cloud monitoring over Antarctica from space has proved essential to the recent advances, the review concludes by emphasizing the need for additional in situ measurements.

Berque, J, Lubin D, Somerville RCJ.  2011.  Transect method for Antarctic cloud property retrieval using AVHRR data. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 32:2887-2903.   10.1080/01431161003745624   AbstractWebsite

For studies of Antarctic climate change, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) offers a time series spanning more than two decades, with numerous overpasses per day from converging polar orbits, and with radiometrically calibrated thermal infrared channels. However, over the Antarctic Plateau, standard multispectral application of AVHRR data for cloud optical property retrieval with individual pixels is problematic due to poor scene contrasts and measurement uncertainties. We present a method that takes advantage of rapid changes in radiances at well-defined cloud boundaries. We examine a transect of AVHRR-measured radiances in the three thermal infrared channels across a boundary between cloudy and cloud-free parts of the image. Using scatter diagrams, made from the data along this transect, of the brightness temperature differences between channels 3 and 4, and channels 4 and 5, it is possible to fit families of radiative transfer solutions to the data to estimate cloud effective temperature, thermodynamic phase, and effective particle radius. The major approximation with this method is that along such a transect, cloud water path has considerable spatial variability, while effective radius, phase, and cloud temperature have much less variability. To illustrate this method, two AVHRR images centred about the South Pole are analysed. The two images are chosen based on their differing contrasts in brightness temperature between clear and cloud-filled pixels, to demonstrate that our method can work with varying cloud top heights. In one image the data are consistent with radiative transfer simulations using ice cloud. In the other, the data are inconsistent with ice cloud and are well simulated with supercooled liquid water cloud at 241.5 K. This method therefore has potential for climatological investigation of the radiatively important phase transition in the extremely cold and pristine Antarctic environment.

Lubin, D, Garrity C, Ramseier RO, Whritner RH.  1997.  Total sea ice concentration retrieval from the SSM/I 85.5 GHz channels during the Arctic summer. Remote Sensing of Environment. 62:63-76.   10.1016/s0034-4257(97)00081-3   AbstractWebsite

During the 1994 Arctic Ocean Section, a joint voyage across the Arctic Ocean, by the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Sea and the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St.-Laurent, telemetry from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) polar orbiters was tracked by a shipboard antenna. Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data was used to generate maps of total sea. ice concentration, using the NASA Team algorithm with the 19 GHz and 37 GHz channels, and using a polarization-based algorithm with the 85.5 GHz channels. When compared with shipboard ice observations, the total sea ice concentration estimated from the 85.5 GHz algorithm are at least as accurate as those from the algorithm that uses only the lower SSM/I frequencies, despite the potential for greater difficulty in dealing with cloud liquid water contamination in the 85.5 GHz signal during the Arctic summer. Near the edge of the ice pack, the 85.5 GHz algorithm often provided more accurate estimates of total ice concentration when compared with surface observations, most likely because of the finer grid spacing at 85.5 GHz (12.5 km vs. 25 km for 37 GHz). However, when using the 85.5 GHz algorithm over regions of lower ice concentration, the reference polarizations in a given image must be chosen with care because over lower sea ice concentration the polarization-based algorithm is more sensitive to cloud opacity and can easily and substantially underestimate the ice concentration. The 85.5 GHz total sea ice retrievals are compared with in situ snow wetness measurements. This comparison suggests that, despite the higher atmospheric opacity at 85.5 GHz, information about sea ice surface properties that affect emissivity can be obtained from these SSM/I channels. (C) Elsevier Science Inc., 1997.

Lubin, D.  2004.  Thermodynamic phase of maritime Antarctic clouds from FTIR and supplementary radiometric data. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 109   10.1029/2003jd003979   AbstractWebsite

A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroradiometer was deployed at Palmer Station, Antarctica, from 1 September to 17 November 1991. This instrument is similar to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) deployed with the U. S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The instrument measured downwelling zenith radiance in the spectral interval 400 2000 cm(-1), at a resolution of 1 cm(-1). The spectral radiance measurements, which can be expressed as spectral brightness temperature T-b(nu), contain information about cloud optical properties in the middle infrared window (800-1200 cm(-1) 1, 8.3-12.5 mm). In this study, this information is exploited to (1) provide additional characterization of Antarctic cloud radiative properties, and (2) demonstrate how multisensor analysis of ARM data can potentially retrieve cloud thermodynamic phase. Radiative transfer simulations demonstrate how T-b(nu) is a function of cloud optical depth tau, effective particle radius r(e), and thermodynamic phase. For typical values of tau and r(e), the effect of increasing the ice fraction of the total optical depth is to flatten the slope of T-b(nu) between 800 1000 cm(-1). For optically thin clouds (tau similar to 3) and larger ice particles (re(ice) > 50 mm) the behavior of T-b(nu) in this interval switches from a decrease with increasing wavenumber n to an increase with nu, once the ice fraction of the total optical depth exceeds similar to0.7. The FTIR spectra alone cannot be interpreted to obtain thermodynamic phase, because a relatively small slope in T-b(nu) between 800-1000 cm(-1) could represent either an optically thin cloud in the ice or mixed phase, or an optically thick cloud radiating as a blackbody. Sky observations and ancillary radiometric data are needed to sort the FTIR spectra into categories of small cloud optical depth, where the mid-IR window data can be interpreted; and larger cloud optical depth, where the FTIR data contain information only about cloud base temperature. Spectral solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance measurements from the U. S. National Science Foundation's UV Monitor at Palmer Station are used to estimate area-averaged effective cloud optical depth tau(sw), and these estimates are used to sort the FTIR data. FTIR measurements with colocated tau(sw) < 16 are interpreted to estimate cloud thermodynamic phase. Precipitating cloud decks generally show flatter slopes in T-b(ν), consistent with the ice or mixed phase. Altostratus decks show a larger range in T-b(ν) slope than low cloud decks, including increasing slopes with ν, suggesting a more likely occurrence of the ice phase. This study illustrates how cloud thermodynamic phase can be defensibly retrieved from FTIR data if high quality shortwave radiometric data are also available to sort the FTIR measurements by cloud opacity, and both data types are available at the ARM sites.

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Bais, AF, Lubin D, Arola A, Bernhard G, Blumthaler M, Chubarova N, Erlick C, Gies HP, Krotkov NA, Lantz K, Mayer B, Mckenzie RL, d. Piacentini R, Seckmeyer G, Slusser JR, Zerefos CZ.  2007.  Surface Ultraviolet Radiation: Past, Present, and Future. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion: 2006. ( Organization W, Ed.)., Geneva, Switzerland: World Meteorological Organization Abstract
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Kerr, J, Seckmeyer G, Bais AF, Bernhard G, Blumthaler M, Diaz SB, Krotkov NA, Lubin D, Mckenzie RL, Sabziparvar AA, Verdebout J.  2002.  Surface Ultraviolet Radiation: Past and Future. Scientific assessment of ozone depletion, 2002. Executive summary. ( Organization W, Ed.).:5.1-5.46., [Washington, D.C.]; [Nairobi, Kenya]; [Geneva, Switzerland]; [Brussels, Belgium]: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration : National Aeronautics and Space Administration ; United Nations Environment Programme ; World Meteorological Organization ; European Commission Abstract
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Xiong, XZ, Stamnes K, Lubin D.  2002.  Surface albedo over the Arctic Ocean derived from AVHRR and its validation with SHEBA data. Journal of Applied Meteorology. 41:413-425.   10.1175/1520-0450(2002)041<0413:saotao>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

A method is presented for retrieving the broadband albedo over the Arctic Ocean using advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data obtained from NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible and near-infrared albedos over snow and ice surfaces are retrieved from AVHRR channels 1 and 2, respectively, and the broadband shortwave albedo is derived through narrow-to-broadband conversion (NTBC). It is found that field measurements taken under different conditions yield different NTBC coefficients. Model simulations over snow and ice surfaces based on rigorous radiative transfer theory support this finding. The lack of a universal set of NTBC coefficients implies a 5%-10% error in the retrieved broadband albedo. An empirical formula is derived for converting albedo values from AVHRR channels 1 and 2 into a broadband albedo under different snow and ice surface conditions. Uncertain calibration of AVHRR channels 1 and 2 is the largest source of uncertainty, and an error of 5% in satellite-measured radiance leads to an error of 5%-10% in the retrieved albedo. NOAA-14 AVHRR data obtained over the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp are used to derive the seasonal variation of the surface albedo over the Arctic Ocean between April and August of 1998. Comparison with surface measurements of albedo by Perovich and others near the SHEBA ice camp shows very good agreement. On average, the retrieval error of albedo from AVHRR is 5%-10%.

Lubin, D, Li W, Dustan P, Mazel CH, Stamnes K.  2001.  Spectral signatures of coral reefs: Features from space. Remote Sensing of Environment. 75:127-137.   10.1016/s0034-4257(00)00161-9   AbstractWebsite

The special signatures of coral reefs and related scenes, as they would be measured above the Earth's atmosphere, are calculated using a coupled atmosphere-ocean discrete ordinates radiative transfer model. Actual measured reflectance spectra from field work are used as input data. Four coral species are considered, to survey the natural range of coral reflectance: Montastrea cavernosa, Acropora palmata, Dichocoenia stokesii, and Siderastrea siderea. Four noncoral objects associated with reefs are also considered: sand, coralline algae, green macroalgae, and algal turf. The reflectance spectra as would be measured at the top of the atmosphere are substantially different from the in situ spectra, due to differential attenuation by the water column and, most importantly, by atmospheric Rayleigh scattering. The result is that many of the spectral features that can be used to distinguish coral species from their surroundings or from one another, which have been used successfully with surface or aircraft data, would be obscured in spectral measurements from a spacecraft. However, above the atmosphere, the radiance contrasts between most coral species and most brighter noncoral objects remain noticeable for water column depths up to 20 m. Over many spectral intervals, the reflectance from dark coral under shallow water is smaller than that of deep water. The maximum top-of-atmosphere radiances, and maximum contrasts between scene types, occur between 400 nm and 600 nm. This study supports the conclusions of recent satellite reef mapping exercises, suggesting that coral reef identification should be feasible using satellite remote sensing, but that detailed reef mapping (e.g., species identification) may be more difficult. (C) Elsevier Science Inc., 2001.

Lubin, D, Cutchin D, Conant W, Grassl H, Schmid U, Biselli W.  1995.  Spectral Longwave Emission in the Tropics - Ftir Measurement at the Sea-Surface and Comparison with Fast Radiation Codes. Journal of Climate. 8:286-295.   10.1175/1520-0442(1995)008<0286:sleitt>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Longwave emission by the tropical western Pacific atmosphere has been measured at the ocean surface by a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroradiometer deployed aboard the research vessel John Vickers as part of the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment. The instrument operated throughout a Pacific Ocean crossing, beginning on 7 March 1993 in Honiara, Solomon Islands, and ending on 29 March 1993 in Los Angeles, and recorded longwave emission spectra under atmospheres associated with sea surface temperatures ranging from 291.0 to 302.8 K. Precipitable water vapor abundances ranged from 1.9 to 5.5 column centimeters. Measured emission spectra (downwelling zenith radiance) covered the middle infrared (5-20 mu m) with one inverse centimeter spectral resolution. FTIR measurements made under an entirely clear field of view are compared with spectra generated by LOWTRAN 7 and MODTRAN 2, as well as downwelling flux calculated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM-2) radiation code, using radiosonde profiles as input data for these calculations. In the spectral interval 800-1000 cm(-1), these comparisons show a discrepancy between FTIR data and MODTRAN 2 having an overall variability of 6-7 mW m(-2) sr(-1) cm and a concave shape that may be related to the representation of water vapor continuum emission in MODTRAN 2. Another discrepancy appears in the spectral interval 1200-1300 cm(-1), where MODTRAN 2 appears to overestimate zenith radiance by 5 mW m(-2) sr(-1) cm. These discrepancies appear consistently; however, they become only slightly larger at the highest water vapor abundances. Because these radiance discrepancies correspond to broadband (500-2000 cm(-1)) flux uncertainties of around 3 W m(-2), there appear to be no serious inadequacies with the performance of MODTRAN 2 or LOWTRAN 7 at high atmospheric temperatures and water vapor abundances. On average, CCM-2 flux calculations agree to within 1 W m(-2) with downwelling flux estimates from the FTIR data over all sea surface temperatures, although this result has a scatter of +/-12 W m(-2) at high sea surface temperatures.

Holm-Hansen, O, Lubin D.  1994.  Solar ultraviolet radiation: effect on rates of CO2 fixation in marine phytoplankton. Regulation of atmospheric CO2 and O2 by photosynthetic carbon metabolism. ( Tolbert NE, Preiss J, Eds.).:55-74., New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press Abstract
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Morrow, E, Scheeres DJ, Lubin D.  2001.  Solar sail orbit operations at asteroids. Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets. 38:279-286.   10.2514/2.3682   AbstractWebsite

The inherent capabilities of solar sails and that they need no onboard supplies of fuel for propulsion make them well suited for use in long-term, multiple-objective missions. They are especially well suited for the exploration of asteroids, where one spacecraft could rendezvous with a number of asteroids in succession. The orbital mechanics of solar sail operations about an asteroid, however, have not yet been studied in detail. Building an previous studies, we find both hovering points and orbiting trajectories about various sized asteroids using equations of motion for a solar sail spacecraft. The orbiting trajectories are stable and offer good coverage of the asteroid surface, although restrictions on sail acceleration are needed for smaller asteroids.

Lubin, D, Ricchiazzi P, Payton A, Gautier C.  2002.  Significance of multidimensional radiative transfer effects measured in surface fluxes at an Antarctic coastline. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 107   10.1029/2001jd002030   AbstractWebsite

[1] At a coastal high-latitude site, multiple reflection of photons between the high albedo surface and an overlying cloud can enhance the downwelling shortwave flux out over the adjacent open water to a distance of several kilometers. This coastal albedo effect has been predicted by theoretical radiative transfer studies and has also been measured under ideal conditions. In this study, three multispectral solar ultraviolet radiometers were deployed in the vicinity of Palmer Station, Antarctica (64degrees 46'S, 64degrees 04'W) to determine the prevalence of the coastal albedo effect under the region's natural variability in cloud cover. One radiometer was deployed near the base of a glacier, and the other two radiometers were deployed on Janus Island and Outcast Island, islets similar to2.8 km (1.5 nautical miles) and 5.6 km (3 nautical miles) distant from Palmer Station, respectively. The radiometers were operated simultaneously for 16 days during late December 1999 and January 2000. Under all cloudy sky conditions sampled by this experiment the coastal albedo effect is seen in the data 60% of the time, in the form of a decreasing gradient in surface flux from Palmer Station through Janus and Outcast Islands. During the other 40% of the cloudy sky measurements, local cloud inhomogeneity obscured the coastal albedo effect. The effect is more apparent under overcast layers that appear spatially uniform and occurs 86% of the time under the low overcast decks sampled. The presence of stratus fractus of bad weather, under higher overcast layers, obscures the coastal albedo effect such that it occurs only 43% of the time. A wavelength dependence is noted in the data under optically thin cloud cover: the ratio of a flux measured at an islet to that measured at the station increases with wavelength. This wavelength dependence can be explained by plane-parallel radiative transfer theory.

Satheesh, SK, Lubin D.  2003.  Short wave versus long wave radiative forcing by Indian Ocean aerosols: Role of sea-surface winds. Geophysical Research Letters. 30   10.1029/2003gl017499   AbstractWebsite

[1] Recent observations over the Indian Ocean have demonstrated aerosol short wave absorption as high as 20 to 25 W m(-2). The aerosol net radiative forcing reduces substantially while considering the broad spectrum including the long wave region (due to large infrared forcing which is opposite in sign). At highwinds, presence of large amounts of sea-salt aerosols (absorbing in infrared) enhances the infrared forcing; hence reduces the net radiative forcing. In this paper, we examine the role of sea-surface winds (which enhance sea-salt aerosols) on long wave aerosol forcing. Even at moderate winds (6-10 m s(-1)), the short wave forcing reduces by similar to45% due to the dominance of sea-salt aerosols. At high winds (>10 m s(-1)), a major fraction of the long wave forcing is contributed by sea-salt (more than 70%). Our studies show that neglecting aerosol long wave radiative forcing can cause large errors in climate models.