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Aagaard, K, Barrie L, Carmack E, Garrity C, Jones EP, Lubin D, Macdonald RW, Swift JH, Tucker W, Wheeler PA, Whritner R.  1996.  U.S., Canadian researchers explore Arctic Ocean. EOS, Transactions American Geophysical Union. 77:209,213.   10.1029/96EO00141   Abstract

During July–September 1994, two Canadian and U.S. ice breakers crossed the Arctic Ocean (Figure 1) to investigate the biological, chemical, and physical systems that define the role of the Arctic in global change. The results are changing our perceptions of the Arctic Ocean as a static environment with low biological productivity to a dynamic and productive system. The experiment was called the Arctic Ocean Section (AOS) and the ships were the Canadian Coast Guard ship Louis S. St.-Laurent and the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Polar Sea.

Lubin, D, Melis C, Tytler D.  2018.  Ultraviolet flux decrease under a grand minimum from IUE short-wavelength observation of solar analogs. Astrophysical Journal Letters. 852   10.3847/2041-8213/aaa124   AbstractWebsite

We have identified a sample of 33 Sun-like stars observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) with the short-wavelength spectrographs that have ground-based detections of chromospheric Ca II H+K activity. Our objective is to determine if these observations can provide an estimate of the decrease in ultraviolet (UV) surface flux associated with a transition from a normal stellar cycle to a grand-minimum state. The activity detections, corrected to solar metallicity, span the range -5.16 < log R'(HK) < -4.26, and eight stars have log R'(HK) < -5.00. The IUE-observed flux spectra are integrated over the wavelength range 1250-1910 A, transformed to surface fluxes, and then normalized to solar B - V. These normalized surface fluxes show a strong linear relationship with activity R'(HK) (R-2 = 0.857 after three outliers are omitted). From this linear regression we estimate a range in UV flux of 9.3% over solar cycle 22 and a reduction of 6.9% below solar cycle minimum under a grand minimum. The 95% confidence interval in this grand-minimum estimate is 5.5%-8.4%. An alternative estimate is provided by the IUE observations of tau Cet (HD 10700), a star having strong evidence of being in a grand-minimum state, and this star's normalized surface flux is 23.0 +/- 5.7% lower than solar cycle minimum.

Lubin, D, Holm-Hansen O, Helbling EW.  1993.  Ultraviolet radiation and its effects on organisms in aquatic environments. Environmental UV photobiology. ( Young AR, Ed.).:379-345., New York: Plenum Press Abstract
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Lubin, D, Morrow E.  2001.  Ultraviolet radiation environment of Antarctica 1. Effect of sea ice on top-of-atmosphere albedo and on satellite retrievals. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 106:33453-33461.   10.1029/2001jd000687   AbstractWebsite

The backscattered ultraviolet radiance measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) over the Southern Ocean is influenced by both cloud cover and sea ice concentration. In TOMS data alone, these influences cannot be separated. To assess the relative importance of cloud opacity and sea ice concentration, TOMS level 2 data are colocated with AVHRR and SSM/I data. AVHRR provides independent cloud identification at a spatial resolution sufficient to estimate cloud fraction within a TOMS level 2 footprint, while the SSM/I provides useful estimates of sea ice concentration over clear and cloudy scenes. The sea ice cover is shown to have a stronger influence than cloud cover on the backscattered ultraviolet radiance at the top of the atmosphere. Over overcast scenes the mean TOMS reflectivity increases from 45 to 84% as the underlying sea ice concentration increases from 0 to 1. Over scenes containing sea ice concentrations greater than 0.5, the increase in TOMS-measured radiance with increasing cloud amount (0-1) is generally less than 30% and is negligible over high sea ice concentrations. Over clear-sky scenes the characteristic UV-A albedos of the sea ice components of the scenes are retrieved from the TOMS data. These albedos range from 0.19 +/- 0.14 for sea ice concentration 0.1, increasing rapidly to 0.53 +/- 0.15 for sea ice concentration 0.3, and then approximately linearly to 0.80 +/- 0.11 for sea ice concentration 1.0. There is the potential to develop a climatology of surface ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation for southern high latitudes, which utilizes a combination of TOMS and SSM/I data. Such a climatology could cover the entire Southern Ocean throughout the duration of the modern springtime ozone depletion phenomenon. Analysis of uncertainties related to sea ice concentration retrieval from SSM/I, and related uncertainties in surface albedo identification and their influence on the estimated surface radiative flux, shows that such a climatology would have the most quantitative value for sea ice concentrations less than 0.5.

Lubin, D, Frederick JE, Krueger AJ.  1989.  The Ultraviolet-Radiation Environment of Antarctica - Mcmurdo Station During September-October 1987. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 94:8491-8496.   10.1029/JD094iD06p08491   AbstractWebsite

The large depletions in column ozone observed over Antarctica during spring imply enhanced levels of solar ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface. Daily data from the Nimbus 7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer were combined with a model of atmospheric radiative transfer to compute the time evolution of ultraviolet irradiance, at wavelengths from 290 to 350 nm, incident on McMurdo Station during September-October 1987. Large changes in column ozone occur as the polar vortex moves over the site. This is accompanied by correspondingly large variations in ultraviolet radiation at the Earth's surface. At a wavelength near 305 nm, the irradiance in early October exceeds values appropriate to an unperturbed ozone layer by a factor of 5–6. As December 21 approaches, the noontime ultraviolet irradiance increases, irrespective of changes in ozone. Any lengthening of the period of ozone depletion toward summer solstice will have a substantial impact on the ultraviolet irradiance received by the Antarctic surface.

Lubin, D, Frederick JE.  1991.  The Ultraviolet-Radiation Environment of the Antarctic Peninsula - the Roles of Ozone and Cloud Cover. Journal of Applied Meteorology. 30:478-493.   10.1175/1520-0450(1991)030<0478:tureot>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The National Science Foundation scanning spectroradiometer at Palmer Station, Antarctica (64-degrees-46'S, 64-degrees-04'W) provides hourly ground-based measurements of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the earth's surface. These measurements define the UV radiation environment of the region and, in conjunction with a daily record of sky conditions and radiative transfer modeling, permit a quantitative understanding of the role of cloud cover in regulating UV radiation levels at the Antarctic surface, including the period of the springtime ozone depletion. The transmission properties of cloud types over the Antarctic Peninsula are quantified by taking the ratio of UV-A irradiances measured under them to UV-A irradiances calculated for clear skies and the same solar zenith angle, and the results are then generalized to the UV-B. Under the average overcast sky in the region, UV irradiance at all wavelengths is slightly greater than half of the value for clear skies. Under the thickest overcast layers, UV irradiance at all wavelengths is roughly 20% what it would be if the sky were clear. In a seasonally averaged sense cloudiness has no effect on the percentage enhancement in UV-B surface irradiance that results from the springtime ozone depletion. However, when considering time scales of hours to several days, an increase in cloud cover can be discussed in terms of its ability to attenuate the solar irradiance; in some cases giving a surface UV-B level comparable to that found under an unperturbed ozone column and clear skies. Depending on the amount of ozone depletion and the type of cloud cover, there will always be a wavelength below which surface radiation levels are excessive during spring.

Holmhansen, O, Helbling EW, Lubin D.  1993.  Ultraviolet-Radiation in Antarctica - Inhibition of Primary Production. Photochemistry and Photobiology. 58:567-570.   10.1111/j.1751-1097.1993.tb04933.x   AbstractWebsite

With the seasonal formation of the ozone hole over Antarctica, there is much concern regarding the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) on the marine ecosystem in the Southern Ocean. In situ incubations of natural phytoplankton assemblages in antarctic waters indicate that under normal ozone conditions UV-B radiation is responsible for a loss of approximately 4.9% of primary production in the euphotic zone, whereas UV radiation with wavelengths between 320 and 360 nm causes a loss of approximately 6.2%. When combined with data on the action spectrum for photoinhibition by UV radiation, our data suggest that the enhanced fluence of UV-B radiation under a well-developed ozone hole (1 50 Dobson units) would decrease daily primary productivity by an additional amount of less-than-or-equal-to 53.8%. Calculations that take into consideration the extent and duration of low stratospheric ozone concentrations during September to November indicate that the decrease in total annual primary production in antarctic waters due to enhanced UV-B radiation would be less-than-or-equal-to 0.20%.

Scott, RC, Lubin D.  2016.  Unique manifestations of mixed-phase cloud microphysics over Ross Island and the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Geophysical Research Letters. 43:2936-2945.   10.1002/2015gl067246   AbstractWebsite

Spaceborne radar and lidar observations from the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites are used to compare seasonal variations in the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds over Ross Island, Antarctica, with two contrasting Arctic atmospheric observatories located in Barrow, Alaska, and Summit, Greenland. At Ross Island, downstream from recurrent intrusions of marine air over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and eastern Ross Ice Shelf, clouds exhibit a tendency toward the greatest geometrical thickness and coldest temperatures in summer, the largest average ice water content, IWC, at low altitude during summer and autumn, the most abundant IWC at cold mixed-phase temperatures (-40 degrees C

Lubin, D, Weber PG.  1995.  The Use of Cloud Reflectance Functions with Satellite Data for Surface Radiation Budget Estimation. Journal of Applied Meteorology. 34:1333-1347.   10.1175/1520-0450(1995)034<1333:tuocrf>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an overcast atmosphere above an ocean surface has been calculated as a function of wavelength using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model. This plane-parallel BRDF appears qualitatively similar to the empirically derived angular dependence models from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. But when these two different BRDFs are used to estimate net shortwave flux at the ocean surface, discrepancies of 20-60 W m(-2) can occur between the respective net surface nux estimations. When using either BRDF with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data for surface radiation budget estimation, this uncertainty can be minimized by restricting the satellite viewing( polar) angle to between 30 degrees and 50 degrees. Accurate measurements of the planetary BRDF would help resolve these differences.