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Lubin, D, Vogelmann AM.  2010.  Observational quantification of a total aerosol indirect effect in the Arctic. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology. 62:181-189.   10.1111/j.1600-0889.2010.00460.x   AbstractWebsite

We use 6 yr of multisensor radiometric data (1998-2003) from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program to provide an observational quantification of the short-wave aerosol first indirect effect in the Arctic. Combined with the previously determined long-wave indirect effect, the total (short-wave and long-wave) first indirect effect in the high Arctic is found to yield a transition from surface warming of +3 W m(-2) during March to a cooling of -11 W m(-2) during May, therefore altering the seasonal cycle of energy input to the Arctic Earth atmosphere system. These data also reveal evidence of a first indirect effect that affects optically thinner clouds during summer. which may represent an additional negative climate feedback that responds to a warming Arctic Ocean with retreating sea ice.

Lubin, D, Frederick JE.  1990.  Observations of ozone and cloud properties from NSF ultraviolet-monitor measurements at Palmer Station, Antarctica. Antarctic Journal of the United States, Washington, DC. 25:241-242. AbstractWebsite

The National Science Foundation scanning spectroradiometer at Palmer Station provides hourly ground-based measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiance. In addition to defining the ultraviolet radiation environment of the region, these measurements allow the derivation of the column density of atmospheric ozone above the station nearly every daylight hour. This hourly time resolution, not generally available from other methods of monitoring Antarctic ozone abundances, enables the detection of large and rapid changes in total column ozone and ultraviolet surface irradiance associated with the dynamics of the polar vortex. In conjunction with a daily record of sky conditions and radiative transfer modeling, the ultraviolet-monitor measurements permit a quantitative understanding of the role of cloud cover in regulating ultraviolet radiation levels at the Antarctic Earth surface.