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Xiong, XZ, Storvold R, Stamnes K, Lubin D.  2004.  Derivation of a threshold function for the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer 3.75 mu m channel and its application in automatic cloud discrimination over snow/ice surfaces. International Journal of Remote Sensing. 25:2995-3017.   10.1080/01431160310001619553   AbstractWebsite

The distinct contrast between the reflectance of solar radiation in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channel 3 (3.75 mum) by clouds and by bright surfaces provides an effective means of cloud discrimination over snow/ice surfaces. A threshold function for the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo in channel 3 (r(3)) is derived and used to develop an improved method for cloud discrimination over snow/ice surfaces that makes explicit use of TOA r(3) . Corrections for radiance anisotropy and temperature effects are required to derive accurate values of r(3) from satellite measurements and to utilize the threshold function. It has been used to retrieve cloud cover fractions from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-14 AVHRR data over the Arctic Ocean and over the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Barrow, Alaska. The retrieved cloud fractions are in good agreement with SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) surface visual observations and with NSA cloud radar and lidar observations, respectively. This method can be utilized to improve cloud discrimination over snow/ice surfaces for any satellite sensor with a channel near 3.7 mum.

Collins, WD, Bucholtz A, Flatau P, Lubin D, Valero FPJ, Weaver CP, Pilewski P.  2000.  Determination of surface heating by convective cloud systems in the central equatorial Pacific from surface and satellite measurements. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 105:14807-14821.   10.1029/2000jd900109   AbstractWebsite

The heating of the ocean surface by longwave radiation from convective clouds has been estimated using measurements from the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX). The ratio of the surface longwave cloud forcing to the cloud radiative forcing on the total atmospheric column is parameterized by the f factor. The f factor is a measure of the partitioning of the cloud radiative effect between the surface and the troposphere. Estimates of the f factor have been obtained by combining simultaneous observations from ship, aircraft, and satellite instruments. The cloud forcing near the ocean surface is determined from radiometers on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration P-3 aircraft and the R/V John Vickers. The longwave cloud forcing at the top of the atmosphere has been estimated from data obtained from the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite GMS 4. A new method for estimating longwave fluxes from satellite narrowband radiances is described. The method is based upon calibrating the satellite radiances against narrowband and broadband infrared measurements from the high-altitude NASA ER-2 aircraft. The average value of f derived from the surface and satellite observations of convective clouds is 0.15 +/- 0.02. The area-mean top-of-atmosphere longwave forcing by convective clouds in the region 10 degrees S-10 degrees N, 160 degrees E-160 degrees W is 40 W/m(2) during CEPEX. Those results indicate that the surface longwave forcing by convective clouds was approximately 5 W/m(2) in the central equatorial Pacific and that this forcing is the smallest radiative component of the surface energy budget.

Tytler, D, O'Meara JM, Suzuki N, Lubin D.  2000.  Deuterium and the baryonic density of the universe. Physics Reports-Review Section of Physics Letters. 333:409-432.   10.1016/s0370-1573(00)00032-6   AbstractWebsite

Big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is the creation of the light nuclei, deuterium, He-3, He-4 and Li-7 during the first few minutes of the universe. Here we discuss recent measurements of the D to H abundance ratio, D/H, in our galaxy and towards quasars. We have achieved an order of magnitude improvement in the precision of the measurement of primordial D/H, using the HIRES spectrograph on the W. M. Keck telescope to measure D in gas with very nearly primordial abundances towards quasars. From 1994 to 1996, it appeared that there could be a factor of 10 range in primordial D/H, but today four examples of low D are secure. High D/H should be much easier to detect, and since there are no convincing examples, it must be extremely rare or non-existent. All data are consistent with a single low value for D/H, and the examples which are consistent with high D/H are readily interpreted as H contamination near the position of D. The new D/H measurements give the most accurate value for the baryon-to-photon ratio, eta, and hence the cosmological baryon density. A similar density is required to explain the amount of Ly alpha absorption from neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at redshift z similar or equal to 3, and to explain the fraction of baryons in local clusters of galaxies. The D/H measurements lead to predictions for the abundances of the other light nuclei, which generally agree with measurements. The remaining differences with some measurements can be explained by a combination of measurement and analysis errors or changes in the abundances after BBN. The measurements do not require physics beyond the standard BBN model. Instead, the agreement between the abundances is used to limit the non-standard physics. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

O'Meara, JM, Tytler D, Kirkman D, Suzuki N, Prochaska JX, Lubin D, Wolfe AM.  2001.  The deuterium to hydrogen abundance ratio toward a fourth QSO: HS 0105+1619. Astrophysical Journal. 552:718-730.   10.1086/320579   AbstractWebsite

We report the measurement of the primordial D/H abundance ratio toward QSO HS 0105+1619. The column density of the neutral hydrogen in the z similar or equal to 2.536 Lyman limit system is high, log N-HI = 19.422 +/- 0.009 cm(-2), allowing for the deuterium to be seen in five Lyman series transitions. The measured value of the D/H ratio toward QSO HS 0105 + 1619 is found to be D/H = 2.54 +/- 0.23 x 10(-5). The metallicity of the system showing D/H is found to be similar or equal to 0.01 solar, indicating that the measured D/H is the primordial D/H within the measurement errors. The gas that shows D/H is neutral, unlike previous D/H systems that were more highly ionized. Thus, the determination of the D/H ratio becomes more secure since we are measuring it in different astrophysical environments, but the error is larger because we now see more dispersion between measurements. Combined with prior measurements of D/H, the best D/H ratio is now D/H = 3.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-5), which is 10% lower than the previous value. The new values for the baryon-to-photon ratio and baryonic matter density derived from D/H are eta = 5.6 +/- 0.5 x 10(-10) and Omega (b), h(2) = 0.0205 +/- 0.0018, respectively.

Jayaraman, A, Lubin D, Ramachandran S, Ramanathan V, Woodbridge E, Collins WD, Zalpuri KS.  1998.  Direct observations of aerosol radiative forcing over the tropical Indian Ocean during the January-February 1996 pre-INDOEX cruise. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 103:13827-13836.   10.1029/98jd00559   AbstractWebsite

Simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth, size distribution, and incoming solar radiation flux were conducted with spectral and broadband radiometers over the coastal Indian region, Arabian Sea, and Indian Ocean in January-February 1996. Columnar aerosol optical depth, delta a, at visible wavelengths was found to be 0.2-0.5 over the Arabian Sea and <0.1 over the equatorial Indian Ocean. Aerosol mass concentration decreased from about 80 mu g/m(3) near the coast to just a few mu g/m(3) over the interior ocean. The sub-micron-size particles showed more than an order of magnitude increase in number concentration near the coast versus the interior ocean. This large gradient in particle concentration was consistent with a corresponding large increase in the Sun-photometer-derived Angstrom exponent, which increased from 0.2 over the Indian Ocean to about 1.4 near the coast. The change in surface-reaching solar flux with delta a was obtained for both the direct and the global solar flux in the visible spectral region. The solar-zenith-angle-normalized global and diffuse fluxes vary almost linearly with normalized delta a. The direct visible (<780 nm) solar flux decreases by about 42 +/- 4 Wm(-2) and the diffuse sky radiation increases by about 30 +/- 3 Wm(-2) with every 0.1 increase in delta a, for solar zenith angles smaller than 60 degrees. For the same extinction optical depth the radiative forcing of the coastal aerosols is larger than the open ocean aerosol forcing by a factor of 2 or larger.