Publications

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2007
Lubin, D, Massom R.  2007.  Remote sensing of Earth's polar regions - Opportunities for computational science. Computing in Science & Engineering. 9:58-71.   10.1109/mcse.2007.16   AbstractWebsite

Polar remote sensing offers numerous opportunities for computer scientists, including spacecraft design and data processing, the development of algorithms for geophysical product retrieval, operational assistance for aircraft and ship navigation, and database management at national archives.

2003
Arrigo, KR, Lubin D, van Dijken GL, Holm-Hansen O, Morrow E.  2003.  Impact of a deep ozone hole on Southern Ocean primary production. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 108   10.1029/2001jc001226   AbstractWebsite

[1] Field studies show that photosynthesis by Antarctic phytoplankton is inhibited by the increased ultraviolet radiation (UVR) resulting from springtime stratospheric ozone (O-3) depletion. To extend previous observations, a numerical model utilizing satellite-derived distributions of O-3, clouds, sea ice, surface temperature, and phytoplankton biomass was developed to study the hemispheric-scale seasonal effects of a deep Antarctic O-3 hole on primary production in the Southern Ocean. UVR-induced losses of surface phytoplankton production were substantial under all O-3 conditions, mostly due to UVA. However, when integrated to the 0.1% light depth, the loss of primary production resulting from enhanced fluxes of UVB due to O-3 depletion was <0.25%. The loss of primary production is minimized by the strong attenuation of UVR within the water column and by sea ice which is at its peak extent at the time of the most severe O-3 depletion.

1998
Podgorny, I, Lubin D.  1998.  Biologically active insolation over Antarctic waters: Effect of a highly reflecting coastline. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 103:2919-2928.   10.1029/97jc02763   AbstractWebsite

Near an Antarctic coastline or sea ice edge, multiple reflection of photons between the high-albedo surface and a cloud will increase the downwelling surface insolation not only over the high-albedo surface itself but also out over the adjacent open water. This insolation enhancement is examined with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. The insolation enhancement extends to a typical distance of 4 km out to sea, with the most important effects being within 2 km of the coastline. The strength of the multiple reflection effect depends primarily on cloud base height and cloud optical depth and only slightly on cloud geometrical thickness. The insolation enhancement is also a function of wavelength, being larger for ultraviolet wavelengths than for the visible. This is due to a slightly greater contribution from Rayleigh scattering at the shorter wavelengths, although at ultraviolet wavelengths where ozone absorption is strong, tropospheric ozone absorption can offset the Rayleigh scattering contribution at larger cloud optical depths. On the basis of the limited range of the multiple reflection effect (2-4 km out to sea) the insolation enhancement due to the high-albedo coastline is unlikely to be a major influence on the primary productivity of all Antarctic waters; however, it may influence phytoplankton blooms near the coast and photobiological experiments carried out at coastal research stations. Also, the insolation enhancement may have significance in sea ice leads and polynyas.

1993
Holmhansen, O, Helbling EW, Lubin D.  1993.  Ultraviolet-Radiation in Antarctica - Inhibition of Primary Production. Photochemistry and Photobiology. 58:567-570.   10.1111/j.1751-1097.1993.tb04933.x   AbstractWebsite

With the seasonal formation of the ozone hole over Antarctica, there is much concern regarding the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation (280-320 nm) on the marine ecosystem in the Southern Ocean. In situ incubations of natural phytoplankton assemblages in antarctic waters indicate that under normal ozone conditions UV-B radiation is responsible for a loss of approximately 4.9% of primary production in the euphotic zone, whereas UV radiation with wavelengths between 320 and 360 nm causes a loss of approximately 6.2%. When combined with data on the action spectrum for photoinhibition by UV radiation, our data suggest that the enhanced fluence of UV-B radiation under a well-developed ozone hole (1 50 Dobson units) would decrease daily primary productivity by an additional amount of less-than-or-equal-to 53.8%. Calculations that take into consideration the extent and duration of low stratospheric ozone concentrations during September to November indicate that the decrease in total annual primary production in antarctic waters due to enhanced UV-B radiation would be less-than-or-equal-to 0.20%.