Publications

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2014
Kahn, BH, Irion FW, Dang VT, Manning EM, Nasiri SL, Naud CM, Blaisdell JM, Schreier MM, Yue Q, Bowman KW, Fetzer EJ, Hulley GC, Liou KN, Lubin D, Ou SC, Susskind J, Takano Y, Tian B, Worden JR.  2014.  The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder version 6 cloud products. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 14:399-426.   10.5194/acp-14-399-2014   AbstractWebsite

The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field-of-view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over version 5 are shown with FOV-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter (D-e), and ice cloud optical thickness (tau) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for 2007 are presented. The largest values of tau are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the tropics, while D-e is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal variability of tau is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and D-e, and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over portions of the diurnal and annual cycles, and capture variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

2011
McFarquhar, GM, Ghan S, Verlinde J, Korolev A, Strapp JW, Schmid B, Tomlinson JM, Wolde M, Brooks SD, Cziczo D, Dubey MK, Fan JW, Flynn C, Gultepe I, Hubbe J, Gilles MK, Laskin A, Lawson P, Leaitch WR, Liu P, Liu XH, Lubin D, Mazzoleni C, Macdonald AM, Moffet RC, Morrison H, Ovchinnikov M, Shupe MD, Turner DD, Xie SC, Zelenyuk A, Bae K, Freer M, Glen A.  2011.  Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 92:183-+.   10.1175/2010bams2935.1   AbstractWebsite

INDIRECT AND SEMI-DIRECT AEROSOL CAMPAIGN (ISDAC): THE IMPACT OF ARCTIC AEROSOLS ON CLOUDS A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro-gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 state-of-the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomass-burning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity. observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.