Publications

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2010
Lubin, D, Vogelmann AM.  2010.  Observational quantification of a total aerosol indirect effect in the Arctic. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology. 62:181-189.   10.1111/j.1600-0889.2010.00460.x   AbstractWebsite

We use 6 yr of multisensor radiometric data (1998-2003) from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program to provide an observational quantification of the short-wave aerosol first indirect effect in the Arctic. Combined with the previously determined long-wave indirect effect, the total (short-wave and long-wave) first indirect effect in the high Arctic is found to yield a transition from surface warming of +3 W m(-2) during March to a cooling of -11 W m(-2) during May, therefore altering the seasonal cycle of energy input to the Arctic Earth atmosphere system. These data also reveal evidence of a first indirect effect that affects optically thinner clouds during summer. which may represent an additional negative climate feedback that responds to a warming Arctic Ocean with retreating sea ice.

2007
Lubin, D, Vogelmann AM.  2007.  Expected magnitude of the aerosol shortwave indirect effect in springtime Arctic liquid water clouds. Geophysical Research Letters. 34   10.1029/2006gl028750   AbstractWebsite

Radiative transfer simulations are used to assess the expected magnitude of the diurnally-averaged shortwave aerosol first indirect effect in Arctic liquid water clouds, in the context of recently discovered longwave surface heating of order 3 to 8 W m(-2) by this same aerosol effect detected at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Site. We find that during March and April, shortwave surface cooling by the first indirect effect is comparable in magnitude to the longwave surface heating. During May and June, the shortwave surface cooling exceeds the longwave heating. Due to multiple reflection of photons between the snow or sea ice surface and cloud base, the shortwave first indirect effect may be easier to detect in surface radiation measurements than from space.