Publications

Export 6 results:
Sort by: [ Author  (Asc)] Title Type Year
A B C D E F G H I J K L [M] N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   [Show ALL]
M
Markus, T, Neumann T, Martino A, Abdalati W, Brunt K, Csatho B, Farrell S, Fricker H, Gardner A, Harding D, Jasinski M, Kwok R, Magruder L, Lubin D, Luthcke S, Morison J, Nelson R, Neuenschwander A, Palm S, Popescu S, Shum CK, Schutz BE, Smith B, Yang YK, Zwally J.  2017.  The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2): Science requirements, concept, and implementation. Remote Sensing of Environment. 190:260-273.   10.1016/j.rse.2016.12.029   AbstractWebsite

The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission used laser altimetry measurements to determine changes in elevations of glaciers and ice sheets, as well as sea ice thickness distribution. These measurements have provided important information on the response of the cryopshere (Earth's frozen surfaces) to changes in atmosphere and ocean condition. ICESat operated from 2003 to 2009 and provided repeat altimetry measurements not only to the cryosphere scientific community but also to the ocean, terrestrial and atmospheric scientific communities. The conclusive assessment of significant ongoing rapid changes in the Earth's ice cover, in part supported by ICESat observations, has strengthened the need for sustained, high accuracy, repeat observations similar to what was provided by the ICESat mission. Following recommendations from the National Research Council for an ICESat follow-on mission, the ICESat-2 mission is now under development for planned launch in 2018. The primary scientific aims of the ICESat-2 mission are to continue measurements of sea ice freeboard and ice sheet elevation to determine their changes at scales from outlet glaciers to the entire ice sheet, and from 105 of meters to the entire polar oceans for sea ice freeboard. ICESat carried a single beam profiling laser altimeter that produced similar to 70 m diameter footprints on the surface of the Earth at similar to 150 m along-track intervals. In contrast, ICESat-2 will operate with three pairs of beams, each pair separated by about 3 km cross-track with a pair spacing of 90 m. Each of the beams will have a nominal 17 m diameter footprint with an along -track sampling interval of 0.7 m. The differences in the ICESat-2 measurement concept are a result of overcoming some limitations associated with the approach used in the ICESat mission. The beam pair configuration of ICESat-2 allows for the determination of local cross -track slope, a significant factor in measuring elevation change for the outlet glaciers surrounding the Greenland and Antarctica coasts. The multiple beam pairs also provide improved spatial coverage. The dense spatial sampling eliminates along -track measurement gaps, and the small footprint diameter is especially useful for sea surface height measurements in the often narrow leads needed for sea ice freeboard and ice thickness retrievals. The ICESat-2 instrumentation concept uses a low energy 532 nm (green) laser in conjunction with single-photon sensitive detectors to measure range. Combining ICESat-2 data with altimetry data collected since the start of the ICESat mission in 2003, such as Operation IceBridge and ESA's CryoSat-2, will yield a 15+ year record of changes in ice sheet elevation and sea ice thickness. ICESat-2 will also provide information of mountain glacier and ice cap elevations changes, land and vegetation heights, inland water elevations, sea surface heights, and cloud layering and optical thickness. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license

Massom, R, Lubin D, SpringerLink.  2006.  Polar Remote Sensing Volume II: Ice Sheets. , Berlin, Heidelberg: Praxis Pub., Chichester, UK Abstract
n/a
McComiskey, A, Ricchiazzi P, Gautier C, Lubin D.  2006.  Assessment of a three dimensional model for atmospheric radiative transfer over heterogeneous land cover. Geophysical Research Letters. 33   10.1029/2005gl025356   AbstractWebsite

A three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer model that explicitly represents surface albedo heterogeneity is tested against a one-dimensional model and surface irradiance observations in a polar region where land cover heterogeneity is high. For observations located near high latitude coastlines, the contrast between the highly absorbing ocean and reflective snow surface creates spatial heterogeneity, or a 3D effect, around the observation site. The resulting effect on radiation at the sensor should be taken into account when using a solar radiative transfer model to interpret measurements. This assessment shows that better closure is obtained with a three-dimensional model (<= 5%) versus a plane-parallel model (<= 7%). The importance of the surface 3D effect increases with aerosol or cloud optical depth and with surface albedo contrast. The model used here can be implemented at any surface site given the surrounding land cover properties.

McFarquhar, GM, Ghan S, Verlinde J, Korolev A, Strapp JW, Schmid B, Tomlinson JM, Wolde M, Brooks SD, Cziczo D, Dubey MK, Fan JW, Flynn C, Gultepe I, Hubbe J, Gilles MK, Laskin A, Lawson P, Leaitch WR, Liu P, Liu XH, Lubin D, Mazzoleni C, Macdonald AM, Moffet RC, Morrison H, Ovchinnikov M, Shupe MD, Turner DD, Xie SC, Zelenyuk A, Bae K, Freer M, Glen A.  2011.  Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 92:183-+.   10.1175/2010bams2935.1   AbstractWebsite

INDIRECT AND SEMI-DIRECT AEROSOL CAMPAIGN (ISDAC): THE IMPACT OF ARCTIC AEROSOLS ON CLOUDS A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro-gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 state-of-the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomass-burning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity. observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.

Morrow, E, Scheeres DJ, Lubin D.  2001.  Solar sail orbit operations at asteroids. Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets. 38:279-286.   10.2514/2.3682   AbstractWebsite

The inherent capabilities of solar sails and that they need no onboard supplies of fuel for propulsion make them well suited for use in long-term, multiple-objective missions. They are especially well suited for the exploration of asteroids, where one spacecraft could rendezvous with a number of asteroids in succession. The orbital mechanics of solar sail operations about an asteroid, however, have not yet been studied in detail. Building an previous studies, we find both hovering points and orbiting trajectories about various sized asteroids using equations of motion for a solar sail spacecraft. The orbiting trajectories are stable and offer good coverage of the asteroid surface, although restrictions on sail acceleration are needed for smaller asteroids.

Mulmenstadt, J, Lubin D, Russell LM, Vogelmann AM.  2012.  Cloud properties over the North Slope of Alaska: Identifying the prevailing meteorological regimes. Journal of Climate. 25:8238-8258.   10.1175/jcli-d-11-00636.1   AbstractWebsite

Long time series of Arctic atmospheric measurements are assembled into meteorological categories that can serve as test cases for climate model evaluation. The meteorological categories are established by applying an objective k-means clustering algorithm to 11 years of standard surface-meteorological observations collected from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2010 at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site of the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM). Four meteorological categories emerge. These meteorological categories constitute the first classification by meteorological regime of a long time series of Arctic meteorological conditions. The synoptic-scale patterns associated with each category, which include well-known synoptic features such as the Aleutian low and Beaufort Sea high, are used to explain the conditions at the NSA site. Cloud properties, which are not used as inputs to the k-means clustering, are found to differ significantly between the regimes and are also well explained by the synoptic-scale influences in each regime. Since the data available at the ARM NSA site include a wealth of cloud observations, this classification is well suited for model observation comparison studies. Each category comprises an ensemble of test cases covering a representative range in variables describing atmospheric structure, moisture content, and cloud properties. This classification is offered as a complement to standard case-study evaluation of climate model parameterizations, in which models are compared against limited realizations of the Earth atmosphere system (e.g., from detailed aircraft measurements).