Publications

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2010
Crawley, A, Kline DI, Dunn S, Anthony K, Dove S.  2010.  The effect of ocean acidification on symbiont photorespiration and productivity in Acropora formosa. Global Change Biology. 16:851-863.   10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.01943.x   AbstractWebsite

Ocean acidification is expected to lower the net accretion of coral reefs yet little is known about its effect on coral photophysiology. This study investigated the effect of increasing CO(2) on photosynthetic capacity and photoprotection in Acropora formosa. The photoprotective role of photorespiration within dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium) has largely been overlooked due to focus on the presence of a carbon-concentrating mechanism despite the evolutionary persistence of a Form II Rubisco. The photorespiratory fixation of oxygen produces phosphoglycolate that would otherwise inhibit carbon fixation though the Calvin cycle if it were not converted to glycolate by phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGPase). Glycolate is then either excreted or dealt with by enzymes in the photorespiratory glycolate and/or glycerate pathways adding to the pool of carbon fixed in photosynthesis. We found that CO(2) enrichment led to enhanced photoacclimation (increased chlorophyll a per cell) to the subsaturating light levels. Light-enhanced dark respiration per cell and xanthophyll de-epoxidation increased, with resultant decreases in photosynthetic capacity (P(nmax)) per chlorophyll. The conservative CO(2) emission scenario (A1B; 600-790 ppm) led to a 38% increase in the P(nmax) per cell whereas the 'business-as-usual' scenario (A1F1; 1160-1500 ppm) led to a 45% reduction in PGPase expression and no change in P(nmax) per cell. These findings support an important functional role for PGPase in dinoflagellates that is potentially compromised under CO(2) enrichment.

2006
Kline, DI, Bryant J, Kisflaudy E, Rohwer G, Nostropaur F, Grayson J, Knowlton N, Rohwer F.  2006.  The aquatic automated dosing and maintenance system (AADAMS). Limnology and Oceanography-Methods. 4:184-192. AbstractWebsite

The maintenance and dosing of aquatic organisms, such as corals and mollusks, are essential for ecotoxicology studies, yet it is difficult to maintain many of these sensitive organisms for an extended period. Consequently, many previous aquatic ecotoxicology experiments have been limited in their number of replicates and maintained in one or a few experimental aquaria, with only a limited number of stressors tested in each experiment. Here we describe a modular system that overcomes many of the difficulties of maintaining large numbers of sensitive aquatic organisms in separate containers, and allows testing of a large suite of stressors in each experiment. The AADAMS (aquatic automated dosing and maintenance system) allows testing of 40 independent stressors with 10 independent replicates per stressor (400 individuals total). The AADAMS provides surge and regular water changes simultaneously with accurate dosing via Venturi valves. In a series of experiments over a 1-year period, the AADAMS was used to test the effects of various factors affecting water quality on Caribbean coral reefs. Roofing tar and road asphalt were two of the most damaging pollutants tested, with LD50 values (lethal dose that killed 50% of the corals) of 0.013 g L-1 and 0.079 g L-1, respectively, thus suggesting that runoff from roads and near-shore construction could be contributing to reef decline. The AADAMS is an accurate, reliable system for highly replicated ecotoxicological studies of sensitive aquatic organisms, which are important indicators of ecosystem health.