Climate, anchovy, and sardine

Citation:
Checkley, DM, Asch RG, Rykaczewski RR.  2017.  Climate, anchovy, and sardine. Annual Review of Marine Sciences, Vol 9. 9:469-493., Palo Alto: Annual Reviews

Keywords:

basin, California Current Ecosystem, change, engraulis-encrasicolus, fish, forage fish, humboldt current, living marine resources, mixing, nitrate, pacific sardine, river, santa-barbara, small pelagic fish, system, top-down pressure, upwelling, variability, western north-america

Abstract:

Anchovy and sardine populated productive ocean regions over hundreds of thousands of years under a naturally varying climate, and are now subject to climate change of equal or greater magnitude occurring over decades to centuries. We hypothesize that anchovy and sardine populations are limited in size by the supply of nitrogen from outside their habitats originating from upwelling, mixing, and rivers. Projections of the responses of anchovy and sardine to climate change rely on a range of model types and consideration of the effects of climate on lower trophic levels, the effects of fishing on higher trophic levels, and the traits of these two types of fish. Distribution, phenology, nutrient supply, plankton composition and production, habitat compression, fishing, and acclimation and adaptation may be affected by ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation, and altered hydrology. Observations of populations and evaluation of model skill are essential to resolve the effects of climate change on these fish.

Notes:

n/a

Website

DOI:

10.1146/annurev-marine-122414-033819