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Agnew, DC.  2018.  An improbable observation of the diurnal core resonance. Pure and Applied Geophysics. 175:1599-1609.   10.1007/s00024-017-1522-1   AbstractWebsite

The resonance associated with the ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary is usually measured with observations of either the Earth's nutations, or of tidal gravity, strain, or tilt. But, improbably, it can also be seen in a dataset collected and processed with older and simpler technologies: the harmonic constants for the ocean tides. One effect of the resonance is to decrease the ratio of the amplitude of the constituent to the amplitude of the constituent to 0.96 of the ratio in the equilibrium tidal potential. The compilation of ocean-tide harmonic constants prepared by the International Hydrographic Bureau between 1930 and 1980 shows considerable scatter in this ratio; however, if problematic stations and regions are removed, this dataset clearly shows a decreased ratio. While these data apply only a weak constraint to the frequency of the resonance, they also show that the effect could have been observed long before it actually was.

Rojstaczer, S, Agnew DC.  1989.  The Influence of Formation Material Properties on the Response of Water Levels in Wells to Earth Tides and Atmospheric Loading. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth and Planets. 94:12403-12411.   10.1029/JB094iB09p12403   AbstractWebsite

The water level in an open well can change in response to deformation of the surrounding material, either because of applied strains (tidal or tectonic) or surface loading by atmospheric pressure changes. Under conditions of no vertical fluid flow and negligible well bore storage (static-confined conditions), the sensitivities to these effects depend on the elastic properties and porosity which characterize the surrounding medium. For a poroelastic medium, high sensitivity to applied areal strains occurs for low porosity, while high sensitivity to atmospheric loading occurs for high porosity; both increase with decreasing compressibility of the solid matrix. These material properties also influence vertical fluid flow induced by areally extensive deformation and can be used to define two types of hydraulic diffusivity which govern pressure diffusion, one for applied strain and one for surface loading. The hydraulic diffusivity which governs pressure diffusion in response to surface loading is slightly smaller than that which governs fluid flow in response to applied strain. Given the static-confined response of a water well to atmospheric loading and Earth tides, the in situ drained matrix compressibility and porosity (and hence the one-dimensional specific storage) can be estimated. Analysis of the static-confined response of five wells to atmospheric loading and Earth tides gives generally reasonable estimates for material properties.

Wang, TH, Cochran ES, Agnew D, Oglesby DD.  2013.  Infrequent triggering of tremor along the San Jacinto Fault near Anza, California. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 103:2482-2497.   10.1785/0120120284   AbstractWebsite

We examine the conditions necessary to trigger tremor along the San Jacinto fault (SJF) near Anza, California, where previous studies suggest triggered tremor occurs, but observations are sparse. We investigate the stress required to trigger tremor using continuous broadband seismograms from 11 stations located near Anza, California. We examine 44 M-w >= 7.4 teleseismic events between 2001 and 2011; these events occur at a wide range of back azimuths and hypocentral distances. In addition, we included one smaller-magnitude, regional event, the 2009 M-w 6.5 Gulf of California earthquake, because it induced extremely high strains at Anza. We find the only episode of triggered tremor occurred during the 3 November 2002 M-w 7.8 Denali earthquake. The tremor episode lasted 300 s, was composed of 12 tremor bursts, and was located along SJF at the northwestern edge of the Anza gap at approximately 13 km depth. The tremor episode started at the Love-wave arrival, when surface-wave particle motions are primarily in the transverse direction. We find that the Denali earthquake induced the second highest stress (similar to 35 kPa) among the 44 teleseismic events and 1 regional event. The dominant period of the Denali surface wave was 22.8 s, at the lower end of the range observed for all events (20-40 s), similar to periods shown to trigger tremor in other locations. The surface waves from the 2009 M-w 6.5 Gulf of California earthquake had the highest observed strain, yet a much shorter dominant period of 10 s and did not trigger tremor. This result suggests that not only the amplitude of the induced strain, but also the period of the incoming surface wave, may control triggering of tremors near Anza. In addition, we find that the transient-shear stress (17-35 kPa) required to trigger tremor along the SJF at Anza is distinctly higher than what has been reported for the well-studied San Andreas fault.

Agnew, D.  1998.  Instruments, Gravity. Sciences of the Earth: An Encyclopedia of places, People and Phenomenon. ( Good G, Ed.).:453-455.: Garland Publishing Abstract
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Agnew, D, Berger J, Buland R, Farrell W.  1976.  International deployment of accelerometers: a network for very long period seismology. EOS Trans. AGU. 57:171-181. Abstract
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