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Agnew, DC.  2005.  GHAM: A compact global geocode suitable for sorting. Computers & Geosciences. 31:1042-1047.   10.1016/j.cageo.2005.02.007   AbstractWebsite

The GHAM code is a technique for labeling geographic locations based on their positions. It defines addresses for equal-area cells bounded by constant latitude and longitude, with arbitrarily fine precision. The cell codes are defined by applying Morton ordering to a recursive division into a 16 by 16 grid, with the resulting numbers encoded into letter-number pairs. A lexical sort of lists of points so labeled will bring near neighbors (usually) close together; tests on a variety of global datasets show that in most cases the actual closest point is adjacent in the list 50% of the time, and within 5 entries 80% of the time. (C) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Dixon, T, Blewitt G, Larson K, Agnew D, Hager B, Kroger P, Krumega L, Strange W.  1990.  GPS measurements of regional deformation in southern California. EOS Trans. AGU. 71:1051-1053,1056. Abstract
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Agnew, D.  1998.  Gravity since 1800. Sciences of the Earth: An Encyclopedia of places, People and Phenomenon. ( Good G, Ed.).:403-406.: Garland Publishing Abstract
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Gonzalez-Garcia, JJ, Prawirodirdjo L, Bock Y, Agnew D.  2003.  Guadalupe Island, Mexico as a new constraint for Pacific plate motion. Geophysical Research Letters. 30   10.1029/2003gl017732   AbstractWebsite

[1] We use GPS data collected on Isla de Guadalupe and in northern Baja California, Mexico, to estimate site velocities relative to Pacific plate motion. The velocities of all three geodetic monuments on Guadalupe fit a rigid Pacific plate model with residuals of 1 mm/yr. Using the Guadalupe data and data from five IGS stations on the Pacific plate ( CHAT, KOKB, KWJ1, MKEA, and THTI) we estimate an angular velocity for this plate that is consistent with other recently-published estimates. Our results indicate that Isla de Guadalupe lies on the Pacific plate, and that GPS data collection on the island usefully constrains Pacific plate motion and rigidity.