Publications

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1994
Wyatt, FK, Agnew DC, Gladwin M.  1994.  Continuous Measurements of Crustal Deformation for the 1992 Landers Earthquake Sequence. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 84:768-779. AbstractWebsite

We describe, and attempt to interpret, continuous measurements of strains and tilts made at Pinon Flat Observatory (PFO) before, during, and after the Landers and Joshua Tree earthquake sequences. These data show substantial transient deformation following the Landers mainshock, with a total amplitude of several percent of the co-seismic deformation, and a decay time of at least several days. Comparing data from the many types of instruments at PFO allows us to infer possible sources for this deformation. The immediate postseismic transient was nearly the same size on three long-base strainmeters, suggesting either broad-scale deformation or local motion near one part of the observatory. The latter can largely be ruled out by the similarity of many other measurements in the area covered by these strainmeters and the observations by others of significant postseismic displacements nearer the source. Possible mechanisms for broad-scale deformation include postseismic fault slip, time-dependent creep in near-surface rocks, and elastic or thermal responses to water-table changes. The first two agree best with the observations from PFO, but if postseismic fault slip is the source, it must have been distributed differently than the co-seismic slip, and may have included faults other than those that ruptured seismically. If one of the other mechanisms is the main source, the PFO data imply that the postseismic slip must have been very much smaller than the seismic slip, perhaps 2% or less. No significant preseismic deformation was observed, at a level of 2 X 10(-3) of the co-seismic deformation, for the days to minutes before the earthquake.

1991
Larson, KM, Webb FH, Agnew DC.  1991.  Application of the Global Positioning System to Crustal Deformation Measurement 2. The Influence of Errors in Orbit Determination Networks. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 96:16567-16584.   10.1029/91jb01276   AbstractWebsite

Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of a geodetic network in southern and central California have been used to investigate the errors introduced by adopting different sets of stations as fixed. Such fixed points, called fiducial stations, are necessary to eliminate the errors of imprecise satellites orbits, which otherwise would dominate the error budget for distances greater than tens of kilometers. These fiducial stations also define the reference frame of the crustal deformation network. Establishing the magnitude of the effect of changing the fiducial network is essential for crustal deformation studies, so that these artifacts of the differences between fiducial networks used for the data analyses are not interpreted as geophysical signals. Solutions for a crustal deformation network spanning distances up to 350 km were computed with a variety of fiducial networks. We use fiducial coordinates determined from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). We compare these solutions by computing the equivalent uniform strain and rotation that best maps one solution into another. If we use a continental-scale fiducial network with good geometry, the distortions between the solutions are about 10(-8), largely independent of the exact choice of stations. The one case of a large-scale fiducial network where the distortions are larger is when the three fiducial stations chosen all lie close to a great circle. Use of a fiducial network no larger than the crustal deformation network can produce apparent strains of up to 10(-7). Our work suggests that fiducial coordinates determined from GPS data analysis may be used, although they should be determined using a consistent reference frame, such as provided by VLBI and satellite laser ranging.