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Astiz, L, Shearer PM, Agnew DC.  2000.  Precise relocations and stress change calculations for the upland earthquake sequence in southern California. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 105:2937-2953.   10.1029/1999jb900336   AbstractWebsite

We relocate earthquakes that occurred near the 1988 (M-L = 4.7) and the 1990 (M-L = 5.5) Upland, California, earthquakes to map the fault geometry of the poorly defined San Jose fault and to test the static:Stress triggering hypothesis for this sequence. We adopt the L1 norm, waveform cross-correlation method of Shearer [1997] to obtain precise relocations for 1573 events: between 1981 and 1997 in the Upland area. To limit computation time, we only perform waveform cross correlation on 60 of the nearest neighbors of leach relocated event. Our final relocations show two linear features. The first is imaged,by the locations of the initial month of aftershocks of the 1988 Upland earthquake, which delineate a fault with a,dip angle of similar to 45 degrees between 7 and 9 km depth, consistent with the mainshock focal mechanism. The second linear feature is a plane, dipping at about 74 degrees from 2 to 9 km depth, which is illuminated by both the 1988:and 1990 Upland sequences, in agreement with the inferred location of the San Jose fault at depth. However, below 9 km the event locations become more diffuse, giving rise to two different interpretations of the fate of the San Jose fault at depth. One possibility is that the fault shallows at depth, consistent with our relocations: but not with the focal mechanism of a M-L = 4.7 deep aftershock. Alternatively, the. fault may be offset at depth by the more shallow dipping fault strand broken during the 1988 earthquake, Using these inferred fault geometries, we compute stress changes resulting from slip during the mainshocks to test whether the relocated aftershocks are consistent with the:hypothesis that more aftershocks occur where the change in static Coulomb failure stress is positive (on faults optimally oriented for failure). This requires an extension of previous models of changes in the failure stress to three dimensions and arbitrary fault orientation. We find that patterns of change in Coulomb failure stress differ little between the different fault geometries: all are nearly symmetric about the fault and so do not match the aftershock distribution, in which most of the off-fault events occur to one side of the fault plane.

Anderson, G, Agnew DC, Johnson HO.  2003.  Salton trough regional deformation estimated from combined trilateration and survey-mode GPS data. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 93:2402-2414.   10.1785/0120030014   AbstractWebsite

The Salton Trough in southeastern California, United States, has one of the highest seismicity and deformation rates in southern California, including 20 earthquakes M 6 or larger since 1892. From 1972 through 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measured a 41-station trilateration network in this region. We remeasured 37 of the USGS baselines using survey-mode Global Positioning System methods from 1995 through 1999. We estimate the Salton Trough deformation field over a nearly 30-year period through combined analysis of baseline length time series from these two datasets. Our primary result is that strain accumulation has been steady over our observation span, at a resolution of about 0.05 mustrain/yr at 95% confidence, with no evidence for significant long-term strain transients despite the occurrence of seven large regional earthquakes during our observation period. Similar to earlier studies, we find that the regional strain field is consistent with 0.5 +/- 0.03 mustrain/yr total engineering shear strain along an axis oriented 311.6degrees +/- 23degrees east of north, approximately parallel to the strike of the major regional faults, the San Andreas and San Jacinto (all uncertainties in the text and tables are standard deviations unless otherwise noted). We also find that (1) the shear strain rate near the San Jacinto fault is at least as high as it is near the San Andreas fault, (2) the areal dilatation near the southeastern Salton Sea is significant, and (3) one station near the southeastern Salton Sea moved anomalously during the period 1987.95-1995.11.

Anderson, JG, Rockwell TK, Agnew DC.  1989.  Past and possible future earthquakes of significance to the San Diego region. Earthquake Spectra. 5:299-335. Abstract
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Agnew, DC, Berger J, Farrell WE, Gilbert JF, Masters G, Miller D.  1986.  Project IDA: a decade in review. EOS Trans. AGU. 67:203-212. Abstract
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Agnew, DC, Hodgkinson K.  2007.  Designing compact causal digital filters for low-frequency strainmeter data. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 97:91-99.   10.1785/0120060088   AbstractWebsite

For the strainmeter component of the Plate Boundary Observatory, filters are needed to produce low-frequency series (5-minute samples) from the higher-frequency (1 Hz) data generated by the instruments. We present design methods for finding filters that are efficient, causal, and compact. We use standard methods for generating symmetric finite impulse response filters, followed by root finding, selection of roots, and reconstruction of the weights, using procedures that make these processes numerically stable. The final filters show appropriate performance even in the presence of large teleseismic signals, but introduce unavoidable artifacts for strain data from large local earthquakes.

Agnew, DC.  1978.  1852 Fort Yuma Earthquake - 2 Additional Accounts. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 68:1761-1762. AbstractWebsite
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Agnew, D.  1998.  Tides, Earth. Sciences of the Earth: An Encyclopedia of places, People and Phenomenon. ( Good G, Ed.).:810-812.: Garland Publishing Abstract
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Agnew, DC.  1983.  Conservation of Mass in Tidal Loading Computations. Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society. 72:321-325.   10.1111/j.1365-246X.1983.tb03786.x   AbstractWebsite

A re-examination of methods for including mass conservation in tidal loading shows that the spherical harmonic correction of Farrell is incorrect. The effect of unconserved mass for a nearly ocean-covered earth shows that the proper spherical harmonic expansion of the Newtonian Green function is the average of the internal and external expansions.

Agnew, DC.  2005.  GHAM: A compact global geocode suitable for sorting. Computers & Geosciences. 31:1042-1047.   10.1016/j.cageo.2005.02.007   AbstractWebsite

The GHAM code is a technique for labeling geographic locations based on their positions. It defines addresses for equal-area cells bounded by constant latitude and longitude, with arbitrarily fine precision. The cell codes are defined by applying Morton ordering to a recursive division into a 16 by 16 grid, with the resulting numbers encoded into letter-number pairs. A lexical sort of lists of points so labeled will bring near neighbors (usually) close together; tests on a variety of global datasets show that in most cases the actual closest point is adjacent in the list 50% of the time, and within 5 entries 80% of the time. (C) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Agnew, DC.  1997.  NLOADF: A program for computing ocean-tide loading. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 102:5109-5110.   10.1029/96jb03458   AbstractWebsite

The loading of the Earth by the ocean tides produces several kinds of signals which can be measured by geodetic technique. In order to compute these most accurately; a combination of global and local models of the ocean tides may be needed. The program NLOADF convolves the Green functions for loading with ocean tide models using a station-centered grid with fixed dimensions, making it easy to combine different ocean models without overlap in the convolution. The program computes all the quantities of interest (gravity, displacement, tilt, and strain) and includes the case where measurements are made beneath the surface of the ocean.

Agnew, DC.  1989.  Robust Pilot Spectrum Estimation for the Quality-Control of Digital Seismic Data. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 79:180-188. AbstractWebsite
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Agnew, DC.  2014.  Variable star symbols for seismicity plots. Seismological Research Letters. 85:775-780.   10.1785/0220130214   AbstractWebsite
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Agnew, D.  1979.  Tsunami history of San Diego. Earthquake and Other perils: San Diego region. ( Abbott PL, Elliott WJ, Eds.).:117-122., San Diego: San Diego Association of Geologists Abstract
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Agnew, DC, Owen S, Shen ZK, Anderson G, Svarc J, Johnson H, Austin KE, Reilinger R.  2002.  Coseismic Displacements from the Hector Mine, California, earthquake: Results from survey-mode global positioning system measurements. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 92:1355-1364.   10.1785/0120000928   AbstractWebsite

We describe the collection and processing of Global Positioning System (GPS) data from 77 locations around the Hector Mine earthquake, which we use to estimate coseismic displacements related to this shock. The existence of pre-event GPS data, some collected to monitor postseismic displacements from the 1992 Landers earthquake and some to establish survey control in the meizoseismal area, provided a relatively dense coverage close to the rupture zone. The data available were collected mostly within the 2 years prior to the 1999 earthquake; we reobserved many points within a few days after the shock, and all within 6 months after. We include corrections for interseismic motion to provide the best value possible for coseismic motion caused by this earthquake. The displacements in general display the pattern expected for a strike-slip fault, though a few show significant vertical motion. The maximum horizontal displacement observed was 2 m; one station between fault ruptures showed little horizontal motion, but significant uplift.

Agnew, DC.  1992.  The Time-Domain Behavior of Power-Law Noises. Geophysical Research Letters. 19:333-336.   10.1029/91gl02832   AbstractWebsite

The power spectra of many geophysical phenomena are well approximated by a power-law dependence on frequency or wavenumber. I derive a simple expression for the root-mean-square variability of a process with such a spectrum over an interval of time or space. The resulting expression yields the power-law time dependence characteristic of fractal processes, but can be generalized to give the temporal variability for more general spectral behaviors. The method is applied to spectra of crustal strain (to show what size of strain events can be detected over periods of months to seconds) and of sea level (to show the difficulty of extracting long-term rates from short records).

Agnew, D.  1987.  The continuous measurement of crustal deformation. Methods of experimental physics 24, Part B, Geophysics. Field measurements. ( Sammis CG, Henyey TL, Celotta R, Eds.).:409-439., London; New-York: Academic press ; Abstract
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Agnew, DC, Larson KM.  2007.  Finding the repeat times of the GPS constellation. Gps Solutions. 11:71-76.   10.1007/s10291-006-0038-4   AbstractWebsite

Single-epoch estimates of position using GPS are improved by removing multipath signals, which repeat when the GPS constellation does. We present two programs for finding this repeat time, one using the orbital period and the other the topocentric positions of the satellites. Both methods show that the repeat time is variable across the constellation, at the few-second level for most satellites, but with a few showing much different values. The repeat time for topocentric positions, which we term the aspect repeat time, averages 247 s less than a day, with fluctuations through the day that may be as much as 2.5 s at high latitudes.

Agnew, DC, Berger J.  1978.  Vertial Seismic Noise at Very Low-Frequencies. Journal of Geophysical Research. 83:5420-5424.   10.1029/JB083iB11p05420   AbstractWebsite

We use records from the Project IDA modified LaCoste gravimeters to investigate ground noise at. frequencies from 1 to 10 mHz. At most sites the level between 2 and 10 mHz is nearly flat and close to 2 × 10−18 m2 s−3 Much higher values which are observed at island and coastal stations are due to loading by waves trapped along the shore. Data from the superconducting gravimeter at Piñon Flat Geophysical Observatory show that the noise power increases as ƒ−2.7 for frequencies between 1 and 0.001 mHz.

Agnew, D.  1991.  How complete is the pre-instrumental record of earthquakes in southern California? Environmental perils, San Diego Region. ( Abbott PL, Elliott WJ, Eds.).:75-88., [San Diego, Calif.]: Published for the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting by the San Diego Association of Geologists Abstract
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Agnew, DC.  1986.  Strainmeters and Tiltmeters. Reviews of Geophysics. 24:579-624. AbstractWebsite
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Agnew, DC.  2007.  Before PBO: an overview of continuous strain and tilt measurements in the United States. Journal of the geodetic Society of Japan. 53:157-182. Abstract
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Agnew, D.  1998.  Gravity since 1800. Sciences of the Earth: An Encyclopedia of places, People and Phenomenon. ( Good G, Ed.).:403-406.: Garland Publishing Abstract
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Agnew, DC, Wyatt FK.  1989.  The 1987 Superstition Hills Earthquake Sequence - Strains and Tilts at Pinon Flat Observatory. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 79:480-492. AbstractWebsite
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Agnew, DC, Wyatt FK.  2014.  Dynamic strains at regional and teleseismic distances. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America. 104:1846-1859.   10.1785/0120140007   AbstractWebsite

We develop formulas for the size of dynamic strains caused by seismic waves from an earthquake of given magnitude and distance. These formulas include peak strain, peak dissipated power, and total dissipated energy, and they are applicable at regional and teleseismic distances. The formulas are fits to data from 89 large (6.5 <= M-w <= 9.0) shallow earthquakes, with source distances between 500 and 16,000 km, recorded between 1977 and 2013 by three long-base laser strainmeters at Pinon Flat Observatory in southern California; these strainmeters provide uniquely well-calibrated measurements of tensor strain. The residuals to the fits suggest that strain values can usually be predicted to within a factor of 2. These data also show that the strain tensor can be substantially different from that expected for plane waves: in particular, the extension perpendicular to the back azimuth, which should be zero, is always 20% or more of the extension along that azimuth. How much the strains resemble those for plane waves depends on their path, perhaps because inhomogeneities along different paths produce different amounts of multipathing. The observed strains are systematically 10%-30% larger at nearby laser strainmeter sites in the Salton trough, suggesting local amplification from inhomogeneous crustal structure.