Publications

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2016
Henry, JQ, Lyons DC.  2016.  Molluscan models: Crepidula fornicata. Current Opinion in Genetics & Development. 39:138-148.   10.1016/j.gde.2016.05.021   AbstractWebsite

Gastropod snails in the genus Crepidula have emerged as model systems for studying a metazoan super clade, the Spiralia. Recent work on one species in particular, Crepidula fornicata, has produced high-resolution cell lineage fate maps, details of morphogenetic events during gastrulation, key insights into the molecular underpinnings of early development, and the first demonstration of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in the Spiralia. Furthermore, invasive species of Crepidula are a significant ecological threat, while one of these, C. fornicata, is also being harvested for food. This review highlights progress towards developing these animals as models for evolutionary, developmental, and ecological studies. Such studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of biology in a major clade of bilaterians. This information may also help us to control and cultivate these snails.

2015
Lyons, DC, Perry KJ, Henry JQ.  2015.  Spiralian gastrulation: germ layer formation, morphogenesis, and fate of the blastopore in the slipper snail Crepidula fornicata. Evodevo. 6   10.1186/s13227-015-0019-1   AbstractWebsite

Background: Gastrulation is a critical step in bilaterian development, directly linked to the segregation of germ layers, establishment of axes, and emergence of the through-gut. Theories about the evolution of gastrulation often concern the fate of the blastopore (site of endomesoderm internalization), which varies widely in a major branch of bilaterians, the Spiralia. In this group, the blastopore has been said to become the mouth, the anus, both, or neither. Different developmental explanations for this variation exist, yet no modern lineage tracing study has ever correlated the position of cells surrounding the blastopore with their contribution to tissues of the mouth, foregut, and anus in a spiralian. This is the first study to do so, using the gastropod Crepidula fornicata. Results: Crepidula gastrulation occurs by epiboly: the first through third quartet micromeres form an epithelial animal cap that expands to cover vegetal endomesodermal precursors. Initially, descendants of the second and third quartet micromeres (2a-2d, 3a-3d) occupy a portion of the blastopore lip. As the blastopore narrows, the micromeres' progeny exhibit lineage-specific behaviors that result in certain sublineages leaving the lip's edge. Anteriorly, cells derived from 3a(2) and 3b(2) undergo a unique epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition involving proliferation and a collective movement of cells into the archenteron. These cells make a novel spiralian germ layer, the ectomesoderm. Posteriorly, cells derived from 3c(2) and 3d(2) undergo a form of convergence and extension that involves zippering of cells and their intercalation across the ventral midline. During this process, several of these cells, as well as the 2d clone, become displaced posteriorly, away from the blastopore. Progeny of 2a-2c and 3a-3d make the mouth and foregut, and the blastopore becomes the opening to the mouth. The anus forms days later, as a secondary opening within the 2d(2) clone, and not from the classically described "anal cells", which we identify as the 3c(221) and 3d(221) cells. Conclusions: Our analysis of Crepidula gastrulation constitutes the first description of blastopore lip morphogenesis and fates using lineage tracing and live imaging. These data have profound implications for hypotheses about the evolution of the bilaterian gut and help explain observed variation in blastopore morphogenesis among spiralians.

2014
McIntyre, DC, Lyons DC, Martik M, McClay DR.  2014.  Branching out: Origins of the sea urchin larval skeleton in development and evolution. Genesis. 52:173-185.   10.1002/dvg.22756   AbstractWebsite

It is a challenge to understand how the information encoded in DNA is used to build a three-dimensional structure. To explore how this works the assembly of a relatively simple skeleton has been examined at multiple control levels. The skeleton of the sea urchin embryo consists of a number of calcite rods produced by 64 skeletogenic cells. The ectoderm supplies spatial cues for patterning, essentially telling the skeletogenic cells where to position themselves and providing the factors for skeletal growth. Here, we describe the information known about how this works. First the ectoderm must be patterned so that the signaling cues are released from precise positions. The skeletogenic cells respond by initiating skeletogenesis immediately beneath two regions (one on the right and the other on the left side). Growth of the skeletal rods requires additional signaling from defined ectodermal locations, and the skeletogenic cells respond to produce a membrane-bound template in which the calcite crystal grows. Important in this process are three signals, fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and Wnt5. Each is necessary for explicit tasks in skeleton production. genesis 52:173-185. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.