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Olsen, N, Holme R, Hulot G, Sabaka T, Neubert T, Toffner-Clausen L, Primdahl F, Jorgensen J, Leger JM, Barraclough D, Bloxham J, Cain J, Constable C, Golovkov V, Jackson A, Kotze P, Langlais B, Macmillan S, Mandea M, Merayo J, Newitt L, Purucker M, Risbo T, Stampe M, Thomson A, Voorhies C.  2000.  Orsted initial field model. Geophysical Research Letters. 27:3607-3610.   10.1029/2000gl011930   AbstractWebsite

Magnetic measurements taken by the Orsted satellite during geomagnetic quiet conditions around January 1, 2000 have been used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the Earth's magnetic field for epoch 2000.0. The maximum degree and order of the model is 19 for internal, and 2 for external, source fields; however, coefficients above degree 14 may not be robust. Such a detailed model exists for only one previous epoch, 1980. Achieved rms misfit is < 2 nT for the scalar intensity and < 3 nT for one of the vector components perpendicular to the magnetic field. For scientific purposes related to the Orsted mission, this model supercedes IGRF 2000.

Korte, M, Constable CG.  2006.  On the use of calibrated relative paleointensity records to improve millennial-scale geomagnetic field models. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 7   10.1029/2006gc001368   AbstractWebsite

[ 1] Current millennial-scale time-varying global geomagnetic field models suffer from a lack of intensity data compared to directional data, because only thermoremanently magnetized material can provide absolute information about the past field strength. The number of archeomagnetic artifacts that can provide such data diminishes rapidly prior to 3000 B. C. Sediment cores provide time series of declination and inclination and of variations of magnetization: the latter can reflect relative geomagnetic field variations if suitably normalized. We propose a calibration technique based on predictions from global models and use the CALS7K. 2 model to calibrate relative paleointensity records from 22 globally distributed locations and assess whether they reflect actual field variations. All except a few contain useful information for 0 to 7 ka and could be used to improve the existing models. Using synthetic data from a numerical dynamo simulation, we show that with the existing directional data the distribution of intensity data has an important influence on model quality. Intensity data from a broad range of latitudes seem particularly important. This study opens the possibility of extending global time-varying geomagnetic field models further back in time than the current 7 kyr interval.

Constable, C.  2000.  On rates of occurrence of geomagnetic reversals. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors. 118:181-193.   10.1016/s0031-9201(99)00139-9   AbstractWebsite

The magnetostratigraphic time scale provides a record of the occurrence of geomagnetic reversals. The temporal distribution of reversals may be modelled as the realization of an inhomogeneous renewal process; i.e., one in which the intensity, lambda(t), or reversal rate is a function of time. Variations in reversal rate occurring on time scales of tens of millions of years an believed to reflect changes in core-mantle boundary conditions influencing the structure of core flow and the field produced by the geodynamo. We present a new estimate for reversal rate variations as a function of time using nonparametric adaptive kernel density estimation and discuss the difficulties in making inferences on the basis of such estimates. Using a technique proposed by Hengartner and Stark (1992a; b; 1995), it is possible to compute confidence bounds on the temporal probability density function for geomagnetic reversals. The method allows the computation of a lower bound on the number of modes required by the observations, thus enabling a test of whether "bumps" are required features of the reversal rate function. Conservative 95% confidence intervals can then be calculated for the temporal location of a single mode or antimode of the probability density function. Using observations from the time interval 0-158 Ma, it is found that the derivative of the rate function must have changed sign at least once. The timing of this sign change is constrained to be between 152.56 and 22.46 Ma the 95% confidence level. Confidence bounds are computed for the reversal rate under the assumption that the observed reversals are a realization of an inhomogenous Poisson or other renewal process with an arbitrary monotonically increasing rate function from the end of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS) to the present, a zero rate during the CNS, and a monotonically decreasing rate function from M29R at 158 Ma to the onset of the CNS. It is unnecessary to invoke more than one sign change in the derivative of the rare function to fit the observations. There is no incompatibility between our results and a recent assertion that there is an asymmetry in average reversal rate prior to and after the CNS, when the CNS is assumed to be a period of zero reversal rate. Neither can we use our results to reject an alternative hypothesis that rates are essentially constant from 158 to 130 Ma, and from 25 Ma to the present. with an intermediate nonstationary segment. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Constable, SC, Parker RL, Constable CG.  1987.  OCCAMS Inversion - A Practical Algorithm for Generating Smooth Models From Electromagnetic Sounding Data. Geophysics. 52:289-300.   10.1190/1.1442303   AbstractWebsite

The inversion of electromagnetic sounding data does not yield a unique solution, but inevitably a single model to interpret the observations is sought. We recommend that this model be as simple, or smooth, as possible, in order to reduce the temptation to overinterpret the data and to eliminate arbitrary discontinuities in simple layered models. To obtain smooth models, the nonlinear forward problem is linearized about a starting model in the usual way, but it is then solved explicitly for the desired model rather than for a model correction. By parameterizing the model in terms of its first or second derivative with depth, the minimum norm solution yields the smoothest possible model. Rather than fitting the experimental data as well as possible (which maximizes the roughness of the model), the smoothest model which fits the data to within an expected tolerance is sought. A practical scheme is developed which optimizes the step size at each iteration and retains the computational efficiency of layered models, resulting in a stable and rapidly convergent algorithm. The inversion of both magnetotelluric and Schlumberger sounding field data, and a joint magnetotelluric‐resistivity inversion, demonstrate the method and show it to have practical application.

Constable, S, Constable C.  2004.  Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated implications for mantle conductivity. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 5   10.1029/2003gc000634   AbstractWebsite

Currents induced in Earth by temporal variations in the external magnetic field have long been used to probe mantle electrical conductivity, but almost exclusively from sparsely distributed land observatories. Satellite-borne magnetometers, such as flown on Magsat, Orsted, and Champ, offer the prospect of improved spatial coverage. The approach we have taken is to isolate induction by harmonic Dst ("disturbance storm time'') excitation of the magnetospheric ring current in satellite magnetic measurements: this is done by removing the magnetic contributions of the main (core) magnetic field, the crustal magnetic field, and ionospheric fields (cause of the daily variation) using Sabaka et al.' s [2000, 2002] CMP3 comprehensive model. The Dst signal is then clearly evident in the midlatitude satellite passes lower than 50 degrees geomagnetic latitude. At higher latitudes, auroral and field aligned currents contaminate the data. We fit the internal and external components of the Dst signal for each equatorial pass, exploiting the fact that the geometry for the internal and external components is different for the azimuthal and radial vector components. The resulting timeseries of internal and external field variations shows that the Dst signals for the dawn passes are half those of the dusk passes. The sum of equatorial external and internal components of the field averaged over dawn and dusk passes provides an excellent estimate for the Dst index, and may in fact be superior when used as a proxy for the purposes of removing induced and magnetospheric fields from satellite magnetic data. We call this estimate satellite Dst. Cross spectral analysis of the internal and external timeseries shows both greater power and higher coherence in the dusk data. We processed the transfer function between internal and external dusk timeseries to provide globally-averaged, frequency dependent impedances that agree well with independently derived estimates. We estimate Earth's radial electrical conductivity structure from these impedances using standard regularized inversion techniques. A near-surface conductor is required, of thickness less than 10 km with a conductivity-thickness product almost exactly that of an average Earth ocean. Inversions suggest that an increase in conductivity at 440 km depth, predicted by recent laboratory measurements on high pressure phases of olivine, is not favored by the data, although, as in previous studies, the 670 km discontinuity between the upper and lower mantle is associated with a two orders of magnitude jump in conductivity. A new feature in our inversions is a further increase in lower mantle conductivity at a depth of 1300 km. A global map of the internal (induced) component of the magnetic field provides a qualitative estimate of three-dimensional (3-D) variations in Earth electrical conductivity, demonstrating graphically that the satellite data are responsive to lateral variations in electrical conductivity caused by the continents and oceans.