Publications

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2018
Gottschalk, J, Hodell DA, Skinner LC, Crowhurst SJ, Jaccard SL, Charles C.  2018.  Past carbonate preservation events in the deep southeast Atlantic Ocean (Cape Basin) and their implications for atlantic overturning dynamics and marine carbon cycling. Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology. 33:643-663.   10.1029/2018pa003353   AbstractWebsite

Micropaleontological and geochemical analyses reveal distinct millennial-scale increases in carbonate preservation in the deep Southeast Atlantic (Cape Basin) during strong and prolonged Greenland interstadials that are superimposed on long-term (orbital-scale) changes in carbonate burial. These data suggest carbonate oversaturation of the deep Atlantic and a strengthened Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the most intense Greenland interstadials. However, proxy evidence from outside the Cape Basin indicates that AMOC changes also occurred during weaker and shorter Greenland interstadials. Here we revisit the link between AMOC dynamics and carbonate saturation in the deep Cape Basin over the last 400 kyr (sediment cores TN057-21,TN057-10, and Ocean Drilling Program Site 1089) by reconstructing centennial changes in carbonate preservation using millimeter-scale X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning data. We observe close agreement between variations in XRF Ca/Ti, sedimentary carbonate content, and foraminiferal shell fragmentation, reflecting a common control primarily through changing deep water carbonate saturation. We suggest that the high-frequency (suborbital) component of the XRF Ca/Ti records indicates the fast and recurrent redistribution of carbonate ions in the Atlantic basin via the AMOC during both long/strong and short/weak North Atlantic climate anomalies. In contrast, the low-frequency (orbital) XRF Ca/Ti component is interpreted to reflect slow adjustments through carbonate compensation and/or changes in the deep ocean respired carbon content. Our findings emphasize the recurrent influence of rapid AMOC variations on the marine carbonate system during past glacial periods, providing a mechanism for transferring the impacts of North Atlantic climate anomalies to the global carbon cycle via the Southern Ocean.

2010
Zaunbrecher, LK, Cobb KM, Beck JW, Charles CD, Druffel ERM, Fairbanks RG, Griffin S, Sayani HR.  2010.  Coral records of central tropical Pacific radiocarbon variability during the last millennium. Paleoceanography. 25   10.1029/2009pa001788   AbstractWebsite

The relationship between decadal to centennial changes in ocean circulation and climate is difficult to discern using the sparse and discontinuous instrumental record of climate and, as such, represents a large uncertainty in coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models. We present new modern and fossil coral radiocarbon (Delta(14)C) records from Palmyra (6 degrees N, 162 degrees W) and Christmas (2 degrees N, 157 degrees W) islands to constrain central tropical Pacific ocean circulation changes during the last millennium. Seasonally to annually resolved coral Delta(14)C measurements from the 10th, 12th-17th, and 20th centuries do not contain significant interannual to decadal-scale variations, despite large changes in coral delta(18)O on these timescales. A centennial-scale increase in coral radiocarbon from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (similar to 900-1200 AD) to the Little Ice Age (similar to 1500-1800) can be largely explained by changes in the atmospheric Delta(14)C, as determined with a box model of Palmyra mixed layer Delta(14)C. However, large 12th century depletions in Palmyra coral Delta(14)C may reflect as much as a 100% increase in upwelling rates and/or a significant decrease in the Delta(14)C of higher-latitude source waters reaching the equatorial Pacific during this time. SEM photos reveal evidence for minor dissolution and addition of secondary aragonite in the fossil corals, but our results suggest that coral Delta(14)C is only compromised after moderate to severe diagenesis for these relatively young fossil corals.

2002
Perks, HM, Charles CD, Keeling RF.  2002.  Precessionally forced productivity variations across the equatorial Pacific. Paleoceanography. 17   10.1029/2000pa000603   AbstractWebsite

[1] Measurements of combustion oxygen demand (COD) in two sediment cores provide a record of paleoproductivity driven by surface-ocean dynamics in the equatorial eastern and western Pacific for the past 400,000 years. The COD time series are well correlated with each other over this time span and show pronounced precessionally forced peaks of higher productivity during globally colder periods. The phase of this signal in the two cores is identical, to within chronological uncertainties, suggesting a common insolation forcing mechanism for the upper ocean across the equatorial Pacific. COD is also in phase with the precessionally forced component of global ice volume, as indicated by oxygen isotopes, and with atmospheric methane in the Vostok ice core. These relationships imply that the COD relative paleoproductivity index provides an important diagnostic measure of the mechanisms of tropical ocean dynamics and climate change.

2000
Moore, MD, Charles CD, Rubenstone JL, Fairbanks RG.  2000.  U/Th-dated sclerosponges from the Indonesian Seaway record subsurface adjustments to west Pacific winds. Paleoceanography. 15:404-416.   10.1029/1999pa000396   AbstractWebsite

Stable isotope records from sclerosponges collected at 10-20 m depth in the Indonesian Seaway and Solomon Islands are particularly well suited for reconstructing century-scale trends in ambient temperature variability and the oceanic uptake of fossil fuel carbon. Basal U/Th dates demonstrate that the sclerosponges analyzed are 85-100 years old. Isotopic records from the Indonesian specimens suggest a strong subsurface cooling over the past 20 years that is not manifested in either surface instrumental or shallower coral proxy records. However, analysis of observed subsurface temperatures in Indonesia, observed winds in the west Pacific, and simulated subsurface temperatures from a steady state general circulation model hindcast forced by observed winds combine to suggest that thermocline adjustments could account for at least part of the recent cooling inferred from the Indonesian sclerosponges. If so, the sclerosponge data suggests that, on average, the west Pacific thermocline has shoaled significantly over at least the past 2 decades.

1994
Naqvi, WA, Charles CD, Fairbanks RG.  1994.  Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Benthic Foraminifera From the Northeast Indian-Ocean - Implications on Glacial-Interglacial Atmospheric CO2 Changes. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 121:99-110.   10.1016/0012-821x(94)90034-5   AbstractWebsite

We present here continuous records of delta(18)O and delta(13)C in benthic foraminifera, extending well into the last ice age, in two piston cores from the Andaman Sea (sill depth similar to 1.3 km) and the Bay of Bengal (3 km). These show that, contrary to the previous reports, the glacial to interglacial shift in delta(13)C,at mid-depths in the Northeast Indian Ocean was indistinguishable from the mean oceanic delta(13)C change, negating a more vigorous renewal of intermediate waters globally during the glacial time. The corresponding delta(13)C Shift in deep waters is estimated to be about 50% larger than that reported previously. Jointly with some recent data from the Pacific, our results indicate a modest glacial-Holocene shift in the intermediate to deep water chemical gradients in the Indo-Pacific as a whole, implying that it was perhaps not the dominant mechanism for the glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. Also, in conflict with previous work, our measurements suggest significant cooling of both the intermediate and deep waters during the glacial time. The high-resolution records from the Andaman Sea help reconstruct paleoenvironmental changes at intermediate depths during the last deglaciation. Rapid increases in delta(13)C occurring in two stages during the early deglaciation appear to have been caused by the fluctuations in the North Atlantic Deep Water production. A negative excursion in delta(13)C during the mid-deglaciation is ascribed to enhanced nutrient regeneration at mid-depths associated with the greatly intensified summer monsoon around the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary.