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Worden, AZ, Nolan JK, Palenik B.  2004.  Assessing the dynamics and ecology of marine picophytoplankton: The importance of the eukaryotic component. Limnology and Oceanography. 49:168-179. AbstractWebsite
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Morel, FMM, Palenik B.  1989.  The aquatic chemistry of biofilms. Structure and Function of Biofilms. 50( Characklis WG, Wilderer PA, Eds.).:351-366., Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.   10.1002/jctb.280500315   Abstract
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Ma, Y, Paulsen IT, Palenik B.  2012.  Analysis of two marine metagenomes reveals the diversity of plasmids in oceanic environments. Environmental Microbiology. 14:453-466.   10.1111/j.1462-2920.2011.02633.x   AbstractWebsite

Plasmid diversity is still poorly understood in pelagic marine environments. Metagenomic approaches have the potential to reveal the genetic diversity of microbes actually present in an environment and the contribution of mobile genetic elements such as plasmids. By searching metagenomic datasets from flow cytometry-sorted coastal California seawater samples dominated by cyanobacteria (SynMeta) and from the Global Ocean Survey (GOS) putative marine plasmid sequences were identified as well as their possible hosts in the same samples. Based on conserved plasmid replication protein sequences predicted from the SynMeta metagenomes, PCR primers were designed for amplification of one plasmid family and used to confirm that metagenomic contigs of this family were derived from plasmids. These results suggest that the majority of plasmids in SynMeta metagenomes were small and cryptic, encoding mostly their own replication proteins. In contrast, probable plasmid sequences identified in the GOS dataset showed more complexity, consistent with a much more diverse microbial population, and included genes involved in plasmid transfer, mobilization, stability and partitioning. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on common replication protein functional domains and, even within one replication domain family, substantial diversity was found within and between different samples. However, some replication protein domain families appear to be rare in the marine environment.

Palenik, B, Morel FMM.  1990.  Amino acid utilization by a marine phytoplankton: A novel mechanism. Limnology and Oceanography. 35:260-269. AbstractWebsite
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Palenik, B, Morel FMM.  1991.  Amine Oxidases of Marine-Phytoplankton. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 57:2440-2443. AbstractWebsite

Some phytoplankton utilized a novel mechanism for obtaining nitrogen from primary amines. They oxidized the primary amines to produce extracellular hydrogen peroxide and aldehydes and used the third reaction product, ammonium, as a nitrogen source. The specificity, regulation, inhibition by bromoethylamine, and potential dependence on copper of this process are described.