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1998
Gilson, J, Roemmich D, Cornuelle B, Fu LL.  1998.  Relationship of TOPEX/Poseidon altimetric height to steric height and circulation in the North Pacific. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 103:27947-27965.   10.1029/98jc01680   AbstractWebsite

TOPEX/Poseidon altimetric height is compared with 20 transpacific eddy-resolving realizations of steric height. The latter are calculated from temperature (expendable bathythermograph (XBT)) and salinity (expendable conductivity and temperature profiler (XCTD)) profiles along a precisely repeating ship track over a period of 5 years. The overall difference between steric height and altimetric height is 5.2 cm RMS. On long wavelengths (lambda < 500 km), the 3.5 cm RMS difference is due mainly to altimetric measurement errors but also has a component from steric variability deeper than the 800 m limit of the XBT. The data sets are very coherent in the long wavelength band, with coherence amplitude of 0.89. This band contains 65% of the total variance in steric height. On short wavelengths (lambda > 500 km), containing 17% of the steric height variance, the 3.0 cm RMS difference and lowered coherence are due to the sparse distribution of altimeter ground tracks along the XBT section. The 2.4 cm RMS difference in the basin-wide spatial mean appears to be due to fluctuations in bottom pressure. Differences between steric height and altimetric height increase near the western boundary, but data variance increases even more, and so the signal-to-noise ratio is highest in the western quarter of the transect. Basin-wide integrals of surface geostrophic transport from steric height and altimetric height are in reasonable agreement. The 1.9 x 10(4) m(2) s(-1) RMS difference is mainly because the interpolated altimetric height lacks spatial resolution across the narrow western boundary current. A linear regression is used to demonstrate the estimation of subsurface temperature from altimetric data. Errors diminish from 0.8 degrees C at 200 m to 0.3 degrees C at 400 m. Geostrophic volume transport, 0-800 m, shows agreement that is similar to surface transport, with 4.8 Sverdrup (Sv) (10(6) m(3) s(-1)) RMS difference. The combination of altimetric height with subsurface temperature and salinity profiling is a powerful tool for observing variability in circulation and transport of the upper ocean. The continuing need for appropriate subsurface data for verification and for statistical estimation is emphasized. This includes salinity measurements, which significantly reduce errors in specific volume and steric height.

Baggeroer, AB, Birdsall TG, Clark C, Colosi JA, Cornuelle BD, Costa D, Dushaw BD, Dzieciuch M, Forbes AMG, Hill C, Howe BM, Marshall J, Menemenlis D, Mercer JA, Metzger K, Munk W, Spindel RC, Stammer D, Worcester PF, Wunsch C.  1998.  Ocean climate change; comparison of acoustic tomography, satellite altimetry, and modeling. Science. 281:1327-1332., Washington, DC, United States (USA): American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC   10.1126/science.281.5381.1327   AbstractWebsite

Comparisons of gyre-scale acoustic and direct thermal measurements of heat content in the Pacific Ocean, satellite altimeter measurements of sea surface height, and results from a general circulation model show that only about half of the seasonal and year-to-year changes in sea level are attributable to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore complicated. The annual cycle of heat flux is 150 ± 25 watts per square meter (peak-to-peak, corresponding to a 0.2°C vertically averaged temperature cycle); an interannual change of similar magnitude is also detected. Meteorological estimates of surface heat flux, if accurate, require a large seasonal cycle in the advective heat flux.

1997
Wiggins, SM, Dorman LM, Cornuelle BD.  1997.  Topography can affect linearization in tomographic inversions. Geophysics. 62:1797-1803.   10.1190/1.1444280   AbstractWebsite

Linearized inverse techniques commonly are used to solve for velocity models from traveltime data. The amount that a model may change without producing large, nonlinear changes in the predicted traveltime data is dependent on the surface topography and parameterization. Simple, one-layer, laterally homogeneous, constant-gradient models are used to study analytically and empirically the effect of topography and parameterization on the linearity of the model-data relationship. If, in a weak-velocity-gradient model, rays turn beneath a valley with topography similar to the radius of curvature of the raypaths, then large nonlinearities will result from small model perturbations. Hills, conversely, create environments in which the data are more nearly linearly related to models with the same model perturbations.

Sutton, PJ, Morawitz WML, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD.  1997.  Temperature evolution of the upper ocean in the Greenland Sea January to march 1989. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 102:27861-27874.   10.1029/97jc02439   AbstractWebsite

Tomographic data obtained during early 1989 in the Greenland Sea have been analyzed at 4-8 hour resolution to give the range-averaged vertical temperature evolution in the upper 500 m for a 106 km path. The tomographic inversions used both ray travel time data and normal mode group velocity data in order to maximize near-surface resolution. Two major events are apparent in the results. The first is the warming of a cold (-1.9 degrees C) 100 m thick surface layer, and the second, 10 days later, is the cooling of a relatively warm (-0.9 degrees C) subsurface layer between 300 m and 500 m depth. This warm subsurface layer is a critical source of salinity and buoyancy for deep convection. The surface layer warming is consistent with a mixed layer deepening over a portion of the path, bringing up water from below. Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) ice data indicate that the local ice field disappears 3-4 days after the surface warming. The cooling of the warm 300 m to 500 m layer is also consistent with a vertical process. There is no ice cover at this time, and so surface heat fluxes are large. A northerly wind event occurs at the onset of the cooling of the 300-500 m layer, suggesting that wind-induced mixing may have played a role in initiating the process. There is evidence of southward flow advecting warm water into the area both before and after the two events studied in detail here.

Sohn, RA, Webb SC, Hildebrand JA, Cornuelle BD.  1997.  Three-dimensional tomographic velocity structure of upper crust, CoAxial segment, Juan de Fuca ridge: Implications for on-axis evolution and hydrothermal circulation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 102:17679-17695.   10.1029/97jb00592   AbstractWebsite

Three-dimensional models of compressional velocity and azimuthal anisotropy from tomographic inversions using 23,564 ocean bottom seismometer P wave arrivals define systematic lateral variations in seismic structure of the CoAxial segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). Over much of the segment the across-axis structure is roughly axisymmetric, characterized by a progressive increase in dike velocities moving away from the ridge axis. This trend is most apparent in the basal dikes, where on-axis velocities are about 800 m/s slower than those measured elsewhere within the rift valley. The on-axis sheeted dikes also exhibit ridge-oriented azimuthal anisotropy, with a peak-to-peak amplitude of about 600 m/s. Outboard of the rift valley, beneath ridge flanks with fault scarps, velocities in the upper 1500 m of crust are reduced. The maximum amplitude of this anomaly is about 700 m/s, located near the top of the sheeted dikes. Variations in the three-dimensional velocity model are believed to reflect changes in crustal porosity, from which we infer an axisymmetric porosity model for seismic layer 2 of the CoAxial segment. As the crust ages, the evolution of layer 2 porosity could occur in the following way: (1) the porosity of zero-age, on-axis dikes is set at formation by the contraction of molten material, (2) hydrothermal alteration fills pore spaces as the dikes move away from the center of the axial valley, and (3) normal faulting on the ridge flank scarps opens fractures and increases porosity of the upper dikes as they move off-axis. At the north end of the segment, dike velocities are several hundred meters per second slower, on average, and the across-axis structure is lost. The transition from a coherent, aligned seismic structure to a less distinct pattern with reduced velocities may represent a shift from magmatic to amagmatic extension moving away from the Cobb hotspot on the ridge axis. The porosity structure we have derived for the CoAxial segment suggests an alternative to the usual hydrothermal circulation model of cross-axis convection cells. A circulation model with along-axis convection cells located entirely within the axial valley appears to be more compatible with our data.

Dushaw, BD, Egbert GD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM, Metzger K.  1997.  A TOPEX/POSEIDON global tidal model (TPXO.2) and barotropic tidal currents determined from long-range acoustic transmissions. Progress in Oceanography. 40:337-367.   10.1016/s0079-6611(98)00008-1   AbstractWebsite

Tidal currents derived from the TPXO.2 global tidal model of Egbert, Bennett, and Foreman are compared with those determined from long-range reciprocal acoustic transmissions. Amplitudes and phases of tidal constituents in the western North Atlantic are derived from acoustic data obtained in 1991-1992 using a pentagonal array of transceivers. Small, spatially coherent differences between the measured and modeled tidal harmonic constants mostly result from smoothing assumptions made in the model and errors caused in the model currents by complicated topography to the southwest of the acoustical array. Acoustically measured harmonic constants (amplitude, phase) of M-2 tidal vorticity (3-8 x 10(-9) s(-1), 210-310 degrees) agree with those derived from the TPXO.2 model (2-5 x 10(-9) s(-1), 250-300 degrees), whereas harmonic constants of about (1-2 x 10(-9) s(-1), 350-360 degrees) are theoretically expected from the equations of motion. Harmonic constants in the North Pacific Ocean are determined using acoustic data from a triangular transceiver array deployed in 1987. These constants are consistent with those given by the TPXO.2 tidal model within the uncertainties. Tidal current harmonic constants determined from current meters do not generally provide a critical test of tidal models. The tidal currents have been estimated to high accuracy using long-range reciprocal acoustic transmissions; these estimates will be useful constraints on future global tidal models. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

1996
Wiggins, SM, Dorman LRM, Cornuelle BD, Hildebrand JA.  1996.  Hess Deep rift valley structure from seismic tomography. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 101:22335-22353.   10.1029/96jb01230   AbstractWebsite

We present results from a seismic refraction experiment conducted across the Hess Deep rift valley in the equatorial east Pacific. P wave travel times between seafloor explosions and ocean bottom seismographs are analyzed using an iterative stochastic inverse method to produce a velocity model of the subsurface structure. The resulting velocity model differs from typical young, fast spreading, East Pacific Rise crust by approximately +/-1 km/s with slow velocities beneath the valley of the deep and a fast region forming the intrarift ridge. We interpret these velocity contrasts as lithologies originating at different depths and/or alteration of the preexisting rock units. We use our seismic model, along with petrologic and bathymetric data from previous studies, to produce a structural model. The model supports low-angle detachment faulting with serpentinization of peridotite as the preferred mechanism for creating the distribution and exposure of lower crustal and upper mantle rocks within Hess Deep.

Morris, M, Roemmich D, Cornuelle B.  1996.  Observations of variability in the South Pacific subtropical gyre. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 26:2359-2380.   10.1175/1520-0485(1996)026<2359:oovits>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Variability of the subtropical gyre in the South Pacific Ocean was investigated using high-resolution expendable bathythermograph sections along a repeated track between New Zealand and Hawaii. The southern part of the section sampled most of the zonal flow in the subtropical gyre with the eastward flowing branch between New Zealand and Fiji and the westward branch extending north of Fiji to approximately 10 degrees S. The time series began in September 1987 and extended through 1994, averaging four cruises every year. The geostrophic shear field was calculated, relative to 800 m, with the aid of a mean T-S relationship. Variability was present at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales but annual fluctuations were particularly prominent. The authors conclude that 30 snapshots of temperature, measured over a period of seven years, are sufficient to resolve the annual cycle of the gyre scale circulation along the transect. The shape and intensity of the gyre varied seasonally throughout the water column (0-800 m). Geostrophic transport was most intense (15 Sv, where Sv=10(6)m(3)s(-1)) in November. At this time, the northern edges of eastward dow at the surface and in the thermocline were closest together and the ratio of thermocline to surface transport was highest. Most intense flow occurred approximately two to three months after the basinwide seasonal peak in Ekman pumping. Transport was weakest(ll Sv) in May and was associated with an increase in the poleward slant of the gyre center with depth and a decrease in the ratio of thermocline to surface transport. Seasonal wind forcing was considered as a possible mechanism for the observed annual intensification of the gyre-scale circulation. A simple linear model of thermocline response to local changes in wind stress curl explained a significant fraction of the observed annual variability. Conservation of potential vorticity q yielded an estimate for the absolute mean how (-1 cm s(-1) at 800 m), consistent with direct measurements in the region. Interannual variability, possibly related to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycle, was observed. The cold event of 1988/89 appeared to be associated with relatively weak gyre-scale transport. After 1991, gyre-scale transport was more intense and a prominent change in the small-scale circulation occurred, with a shift in the alongtrack wavenumber spectral energy to higher wavenumbers.

Morawitz, WML, Sutton PJ, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Lynch JF, Pawlowicz R.  1996.  Three-dimensional observations of a deep convective chimney in the Greenland sea during Winter 1988/89. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 26:2316-2343.   10.1175/1520-0485(1996)026<2316:tdooad>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

All available temperature data, including moored thermistor. hydrographic, and tomographic measurements, have been combined using least-squares inverse methods to study the evolution of the three-dimensional temperature field in the Greenland Sea during winter 1988/89. The data are adequate to resolve features with spatial scares of about 40 km and larger. A chimney structure reaching depths in excess of 1000 m is observed to the southwest of the gyre center during March 1989. The chimney has a spatial scale of about 50 km, near the limit of the spatial resolution of the data, and a timescale of about 10 days, The chimney structure breaks up and disappears in only 3-6 days. A one-dimensional vertical heat balance adequately describes changes in total heat content in the chimney region from autumn 1988 until the time of chimney breakup, when horizontal advection becomes important. A simple one-dimensional mixed layer model is surprisingly successful in reproducing autumn to winter bulk temperature and salinity changes, as well as the observed evolution of the mixed layer to depths in excess of 1000 m. Uncertainties in surface freshwater fluxes make it difficult to determine whether net evaporation minus precipitation, or ice advection, is responsible for the observed depth-averaged salinity increase from autumn to winter in the chimney region. Rough estimates of the potential energy balance In the mixed laver suggest that potential energy changes are reasonably consistent with turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production terms. Initially the TKE term parameterizing wind forcing and shear production is important, but as the mixed layer deepens the surface buoyancy production term dominates. The estimated average annual deep-water production rate in the Greenland Sea for 1988/89 is about 0.1 Sverdrups, comparable to production rates during the 1980s and early 1990s derived from tracer measurements. The location of the deep convection observed appears to be sensitively linked to the amount of Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW) present from autumn through spring. Although AIW is an important source of salt for the surface waters, too much AIW overstratifies the water column, preventing deep convection from occurring.

Morawitz, WML, Cornuelle BD, Worcester PF.  1996.  A case study in three-dimensional inverse methods: Combining hydrographic, acoustic, and moored thermistor data in the Greenland sea. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 13:659-679.   10.1175/1520-0426(1996)013<0659:acsitd>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

A variety of measurements, including acoustic travel times, moored thermistor time series, and hydrographic stations, were made in the Greenland Sea during 1988-89 to study the evolution of the temperature held throughout the year. This region is of intense oceanographic interest because it is one of the few areas in the world where open-ocean convection to great depths has been observed. This paper describes how the various data types were optimally combined using linear, weighted least squares inverse methods to provide significantly more information about the ocean than can be obtained from any single data type. The application of these methods requires construction of a reference state, a statistical model of ocean temperature variability relative to the reference state, and an analysis of the differing signal-to-noise ratios of each data type. A time-dependent reference state was constructed from all available hydrographic data, reflecting !he basic seasonal variability and keeping the perturbations sufficiently small so that linear inverse methods are applicable. Smoothed estimates of the vertical and horizontal covariances of the sound speed (temperature) variability were derived separately for summer and winter from all available hydrographic and moored thermistor data. The vertical covariances were normalized before bring decomposed into eigenvectors, so that eigenvectors were optimized to fit a fixed percentage of the variance at every depth. The 12 largest redimensionalized eigenvectors compose the vertical basis of the model. A spectral decomposition of a 40-km correlation scale Gaussian covariance is used as the horizontal basis. The uncertainty estimates provided by the inverse method illustrate the characteristics of each dataset in measuring large-scale features during a diversely sampled time period in the winter of 1989. The acoustic data alone resolve about 70% of the variance in the three-dimensional, 3-day average temperature field. The hydrographic data alone resolve approximately 65% of the variance during the selected period but are much less dense or absent over most of the year. The thermistor array alone resolves from 10% to 65% of the temperature variance, doing better near the surface where the most measurements were taken. The combination of the complete 1988-89 acoustic, hydrographic, and thermistor datasets give three-dimensional temperature and heat content estimates that resolve on average about 90% of the expected variance during this particularly densely sampled time period.

Cornuelle, BD, Worcester PF.  1996.  Ocean Acoustic Tomography: Integral data and ocean models. Elsevier oceanography series. ( Malanotte-Rizzoli P, Ed.).:97-115., Amsterdam, New York: Elsevier Abstract
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1995
Duda, TF, Pawlowicz RA, Lynch JF, Cornuelle BD.  1995.  Simulated Tomographic Reconstruction of Ocean Features Using Drifting Acoustic Receivers and a Navigated Source. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 98:2270-2279.   10.1121/1.413341   AbstractWebsite

Numerically simulated acoustic transmission from a single source of known position (for example, suspended from a ship) to receivers of partially known position (for example, sonobuoys dropped from the air) are used for tomographic mapping of ocean sound speed. The maps are evaluated for accuracy and utility. Grids of 16 receivers are employed, with sizes of 150, 300, and 700 km square. Ordinary statistical measures are used to evaluate the pattern similarity and thus the mapping capability of the, system. For an array of 300 km square, quantitative error in the maps grows with receiver position uncertainty. The large and small arrays show lesser mapping capability than the mid-size array. Mapping errors increase with receiver position uncertainty for uncertainties less than 1000-m rms, but uncertainties exceeding that have less systematic effect on the maps. Maps of rms error of the field do not provide a complete view of the utility of the acoustic network. Features of maps are surprisingly reproducible for different navigation error levels, and give comparable information about mesoscale structures despite great variations in those levels. (C) 1995 Acoustical Society of America.

Dushaw, BD, Cornuelle BD, Worcester PF, Howe BM, Luther DS.  1995.  Barotropic and Baroclinic Tides in the Central North Pacific-Ocean Determined from Long-Range Reciprocal Acoustic Transmissions. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 25:631-647.   10.1175/1520-0485(1995)025<0631:babtit>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Travel times of reciprocal 1000-km range acoustic transmissions, determined from the 1987 Reciprocal Tomography Experiment, are used to study barotropic tidal currents and a large-scale, coherent baroclinic tide in the central North Pacific Ocean. The difference in reciprocal travel times determines the tidal currents, while the sum of reciprocal travel times determines the baroclinic tide displacement of isotachs (or equivalently, isotherms). The barotropic tidal current accounts for 90% of the observed differential travel time variance. The measured harmonic constants of the eight major tidal constituents of the barotropic tide and the constants determined from current meter measurements agree well with the empirical-numerical tidal models of Schwiderski and Cartwright et al. The amplitudes and phases of the first-mode baroclinic tide determined from sum travel times agree with those determined from moored thermistors and current meters. The baroclinic tidal signals are consistent with a large-scale, phase-locked internal tide, which apparently has propagated northward over 2000 km from the Hawaiian Ridge. The amplitude, phase, and polarization of the first-mode M(2) baroclinic tidal displacement and current are consistent with a northward propagating internal tide. The ratio of baroclinic energy to barotropic energy determined using the range-averaging acoustic transmissions is about 8%, while a ratio of 26% was determined from the point measurements. The large-scale, internal tide energy flux, presumed northward, is estimated to be about 180 W m(-1).

1994
McDonald, MA, Webb SC, Hildebrand JA, Cornuelle BD, Fox CG.  1994.  Seismic Structure and Anisotropy of the Juan-De-Fuca Ridge at 45-Degrees-N. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 99:4857-4873.   10.1029/93jb02801   AbstractWebsite

A seismic refraction experiment was conducted with air guns and ocean bottom seismometers on the Juan de Fuca Ridge at 45-degrees-N, at the northern Cleft segment and at the overlapping rift zone between the Cleft and Vance segments. These data determine the average velocity structure of the upper crust and map the thickness variability of the shallow low-velocity layer, which we interpret as the extrusive volcanic layer. The experiment is unique because a large number of travel times were measured along ray paths oriented at all azimuths within a small (20 km by 35 km) area. These travel times provide evidence for compressional velocity anisotropy in the upper several hundred meters of oceanic crust, presumed to be caused by ridge-parallel fracturing. Compressional velocities are 3.35 km/s in the ridge strike direction and 2.25 km/s across strike. Travel time residuals are simultaneously inverted for anisotropy as well as lateral thickness variations in the low-velocity layer. Extrusive layer thickness ranges from approximately 200 m to 550 m with an average of 350 m. The zone of the thinnest low-velocity layer is within the northern Cleft segment axial valley, in a region of significant hydrothermal activity. Layer thickness variability is greatest near the Cleft-Vance overlapping rift zone, where changes of 300 m occur over as little as several kilometers laterally. These low-velocity layer thickness changes may correspond to fault block rotations in an episodic spreading system, where the low side of each fault block accumulates more extrusive volcanics.

Worcester, PF, Cornuelle BD, Hildebrand JA, Hodgkiss WS, Duda TF, Boyd J, Howe BM, Mercer JA, Spindel RC.  1994.  A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Broad-Band Acoustic Arrival Patterns in Travel Time-Depth Coordinates at 1000-Km Range. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 95:3118-3128.   10.1121/1.409977   AbstractWebsite

Broadband acoustic signals were transmitted from a moored 250-Hz source to a 3-km-long vertical line array of hydrophones 1000 km distant in the eastern North Pacific Ocean during July 1989. The sound-speed field along the great circle path connecting the source and receiver was measured directly by nearly 300 expendable bathythermograph (XBT), conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD), and air-launched expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) casts while the transmissions were in progress. This experiment is unique in combining a vertical receiving array that extends over much of the water column, extensive concurrent environmental measurements, and broadband signals designed to measure acoustic travel times with 1-ms precision. The time-mean travel times of the early raylike arrivals, which are evident as wave fronts sweeping across the receiving array, and the time-mean of the times at which the acoustic reception ends (the final cutoffs) for hydrophones near the sound channel axis, are consistent with ray predictions based on the direct measurements of temperature and salinity, within measurement uncertainty. The comparisons show that subinertial oceanic variability with horizontal wavelengths shorter than 50 km, which is not resolved by the direct measurements, significantly (25 ms peak-to-peak) affects the time-mean ray travel times. The final cutoffs occur significantly later than predicted using ray theory for hydrophones more than 100-200 m off the sound channel axis. Nongeometric effects, such as diffraction at caustics, partially account for this observation.

Sutton, P, Morawitz WML, Cornuelle BD, Masters G, Worcester PF.  1994.  Incorporation of Acoustic Normal-Mode Data Into Tomographic Inversions in the Greenland Sea. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 99:12487-12502.   10.1029/94jc00210   AbstractWebsite

Acoustic normal mode group velocity data are extracted from tomographic receptions in the Greenland Sea using a combination of spatial filtering with data from a six-element hydrophone array and variable time windowing. The mode group velocity data, together with ray travel time data, are used in inversions to obtain the range average sound speed profile. The modal data significantly improve near-surface resolution, which is where the largest oceanographic signals occur. Inverse results using only acoustic data are consistent with point measurements, a Seasoar section, and sparse conductivity-temperature-depth data.

Dushaw, BD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM.  1994.  Barotropic Currents and Vorticity in the Central North Pacific-Ocean During Summer 1987 Determined from Long-Range Reciprocal Acoustic Transmissions. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 99:3263-3272.   10.1029/93jc03335   AbstractWebsite

Large-scale depth-integrated currents and relative vorticity were measured in the central North Pacific Ocean during summer 1987 using long-range reciprocal acoustic transmissions between transceivers in a triangle approximately 1000 km on a side. Inverse techniques were used to estimate the depth-averaged (barotropic) current bihourly at 4-day intervals from differential travel times. Tidal constituent amplitudes and phases found from the acoustically determined currents agree with those found from current meters and with the tidal models of Schwiderski (1980) and Cartwright et al. (1992), providing confirmation that the tomographically derived barotropic currents are correct within the expected uncertainties. The estimated low-frequency, large-scale currents are compared with depth-averaged currents determined by point measurements using current meters and bottom-mounted electrometers. Meridional and zonal currents are calculated using the topographic Sverdrup balance with the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center wind field. The measured time derivative of the areally averaged relative vorticity is shown to be insignificant to the Sverdrup balance. Currents and vorticity calculated using the Sverdrup balance are an order of magnitude smaller than the observations. The magnitude and variability of the large-scale currents and vorticity determined from the Semtner and Chervin (1988) eddy-resolving model of ocean circulation are similar to the direct measurements.

Hammer, PTC, Dorman LM, Hildebrand JA, Cornuelle BD.  1994.  Jasper Seamount Structure - Seafloor Seismic Refraction Tomography. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 99:6731-6752.   10.1029/93jb02170   AbstractWebsite

The velocity structure of Jasper Seamount was modeled using one- and three-dimensional inversions of P wave travel times. The results represent the first detailed seismic images of a submerged, intraplate volcano. Two seismic refraction experiments were completed on Jasper Seamount, incorporating ocean bottom seismometers and navigated seafloor shots. The P wave travel times were first used to compute a one-dimensional velocity profile which served as a starting model for a three-dimensional tomographic inversion. The seamount P velocities are significantly slower than those observed in typical oceanic crust at equivalent subbasement depths. This suggests that Jasper Seamount is constructed predominantly of extrusive lavas with high average porosity. The velocity models confirm morphological predictions: Jasper Seamount is a shield volcano with rift zone development. High seismic velocities were detected beneath the large radial ridges while low velocities characterize the shallow summit and flanks. Comparisons between P velocity models of Jasper Seamount and the island of Hawaii reveal that these two shield volcanoes are not structurally proportional. Jasper Seamount is far smaller than Hawaii, yet both volcanoes exhibit an outer extrusive layer of similar thickness. This suggests that seamount size influences the intrusive/extrusive proportions; density equilibrium between melt and country rock may explain this behavior.

The AMODE-MST Group, Birdsall TG, Boyd J, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM, Knox R, Mercer JA, Metzger Jr. K, Spindel RC, Worcester PF.  1994.  Moving ship tomography in the North Atlantic. EOS Trans. AGU. 75:17,21,23. Abstract
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1993
Cornuelle, BD, Worcester PF, Hildebrand JA, Hodgkiss WS, Duda TF, Boyd J, Howe BM, Mercer JA, Spindel RC.  1993.  Ocean Acoustic Tomography at 1000-Km Range Using Wave-Fronts Measured with a Large-Aperture Vertical Array. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 98:16365-16377.   10.1029/93jc01246   AbstractWebsite

Broadband acoustic signals transmitted from a moored 250-Hz source to a 3-km-long vertical line array of hydrophones 1000 km distant in the north central Pacific Ocean were used to determine the amount of information available from tomographic techniques used in the vertical plane connecting a source-receiver pair. A range-independent, pure acoustic inverse to obtain the sound speed field using travel time data from the array is shown to be possible by iterating from climatological data without using any information from concurrent environmental measurements. Range-dependent inversions indicate resolution of components of oceanic variability with horizontal wavelengths shorter than 50 km, although the limited spatial resolution of concurrent direct measurements does not provide a strong cross-validation, since the typical cast spacing of 20-25 km gives a Nyquist wavelength of 40-50 km. The small travel time signals associated with high-wavenumber ocean variability place stringent but achievable requirements on travel time measurement precision. The forward problem for the high-wavenumber components of the model is found to be subject to relatively large linearization errors, however, unless the sound speed field at wavelengths greater than about 50 km is known from other measurements or from a two-dimensional tomographic array. The high-ocean-wavenumber resolution that is in principle available from tomographic measurements is therefore achievable only under restricted conditions.

Sutton, PJ, Worcester PF, Masters G, Cornuelle BD, Lynch JF.  1993.  Ocean Mixed Layers and Acoustic Pulse-Propagation in the Greenland Sea. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 94:1517-1526.   10.1121/1.408128   AbstractWebsite

A simple one-dimensional ocean mixed layer model is used to study the effect of the transition between summer and winter conditions in the Greenland Sea on range-independent acoustic propagation. Acoustic normal modes propagated through the evolving sound-speed profile simulate broadband acoustic receptions from the Greenland Sea Tomography Experiment. The resulting changes in arrival structure and travel time are compared with data recorded between two of the tomographic moorings. The starting state for the model is the average of measured summer temperature and salinity profiles. At each time step the surface layer is modified by the removal of heat (modeling heat loss to the atmosphere) and the removal of fresh water (modeling evaporation minus precipitation). When necessary, static stability is maintained by mixing the surface layer into deeper layers. The acoustic normal modes exhibit large changes in behavior as the profile changes. In both summer (seasonal thermocline) and winter (adiabatic sound-speed profile) individual modes show minimal frequency dispersion. Intermediate profiles with a shallow surface mixed layer give highly dispersive modes, delaying the final acoustic energy cutoff by several hundred milliseconds relative to the summer and winter cases. This is the largest travel time signal observed in the data. The largest peak in the late continuous acoustic energy is due to minimally dispersed modes and corresponds to ray arrivals with near horizontal receiver angles. The amplitude of the arrival is low when significant dispersion is present.

Worcester, PF, Lynch JF, Morawitz WML, Pawlowicz R, Sutton PJ, Cornuelle BD, Johannessen OM, Munk WH, Owens WB, Shuchman R, Spindel RC.  1993.  Evolution of the Large-Scale Temperature-Field in the Greenland Sea During 1988-89 from Tomographic Measurements. Geophysical Research Letters. 20:2211-2214.   10.1029/93gl02373   AbstractWebsite

The Greenland Sea Ocean Acoustic Tomography Experiment was conducted during 1988-89, as one component of the international Greenland Sea Project, to study deep water formation and the response of the gyre to variations in wind stress and ice cover. Six acoustic transceivers moored in an array 200-km across transmitted to one another at four hour intervals. Near the end of February, 1989, a sub-surface temperature maximum at several hundred meters depth disappeared over a suprisingly large area of the central Greenland Sea . While the water column was modified to about 1000 m depth over much of the gyre, the surface remained colder than the deeper water, contrary to what might be expected from simple models of convective renewal.

Cornuelle, BD, Morris MY, Roemmich DH.  1993.  An Objective Mapping Method for Estimating Geostrophic Velocity from Hydrographic Sections Including the Equator. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 98:18109-18118.   10.1029/93jc01729   AbstractWebsite

Objective mapping can remove the equatorial singularity from the problem of estimating geostrophic shear from noisy density measurements. The method uses the complete thermal wind relation, so it is valid uniformly on and off the equator. Errors in the thermal wind balance are due to neglected terms in the momentum balance, which are treated as noise in the inverse problem. The question of whether the geostrophic balance holds near the equator is restated as a need to estimate the size of the ageostrophic noise in the thermal wind equation. Objective mapping formalizes the assumptions about the magnitudes and scales of the geostrophic currents and about the magnitudes and scales of the ageostrophic terms and measurement errors. The uncertainty of the velocity estimates is calculated as part of the mapping and depends on the signal to noise ratio (geostrophic density signal to ageostrophic ''noise'') in the data, as well as the station spacing and the scales assumed for the geostrophic velocities. The method is used to map zonal velocity from a mean Hawaii-Tahiti Shuttle density section. These are compared with previous velocity estimates for the same dataset calculated using other techniques. By choosing appropriate scales, the objective map can duplicate previous results. New temperature data are presented from a repeating, high-resolution expendable bathythermograph section crossing the equator at about 170-degrees-W with four cruises a year between 1987-1991. There appear to be significant differences between this mean temperature and the shuttle mean temperature. Temperature is converted to density with the aid of a mean T-S relation and geostrophic velocity maps are calculated for the 4-year mean. The mean geostrophic undercurrent obtained from our sections is weaker than in the shuttle estimate and is centered slightly north of the equator. Enforcing symmetry about the equator removes the offset of the current, giving a stronger, but narrow undercurrent. The density field apparently includes significant (O(0.5 kg M-3)) large-scale ageostrophic variability which makes velocity estimates from single cruises poorly determined near the equator.

Dushaw, BD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM.  1993.  On Equations for the Speed of Sound in Seawater. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 93:255-275.   10.1121/1.405660   AbstractWebsite

Long-range acoustic transmissions made in conjunction with extensive environmental measurements and accurate mooring position determinations have been used to test the accuracy of equations used to calculate sound speed from pressure, temperature, and salinity. The sound-speed fields computed using the Del Grosso equation [ V. A. Del Grosso, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 1084-1091 (1974)] give predictions of acoustic arrival patterns which agree significantly better with the long-range measurements than those computed using the Chen and Millero equation [ C. Chen and F. J. Millero, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62, 1129-1135 (1977) The predicted ray travel times and travel time error have been calculated using objectively mapped sound-speed fields computed from conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data. Using the measured and predicted ray travel times, a negligible correction to Del Grosso's equation of + 0.05 +/- 0.05 m/s at 4000-m depth is calculated.

Dushaw, BD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM.  1993.  Variability of Heat-Content in the Central North Pacific in Summer 1987 Determined from Long-Range Acoustic Transmissions. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 23:2650-2666.   10.1175/1520-0485(1993)023<2650:vohcit>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The evolution of the heat content in the central North Pacific Ocean during summer 1987 has been measured using acoustic transmissions between transceivers deployed in a triangle approximately 1000 km on a side. The acoustically determined heat contents of the source-receiver sections agree with heat contents computed from CTD and XBT data obtained during May and September 1987. The accuracy of acoustical measurements of range-averaged heat content is comparable to estimates from CTD and XBT data. Transmissions at four-day intervals allow the continuous observation of heat content and show that it varies on time scales of weeks or less. The magnitude of these variations is of the same order as that observed from XBT sections, which are only occasionally available. Ocean-atmosphere heat exchange from bulk formulas accounts for only about half of the observed heat content increase from May through September 1987, indicating that advective effects are important in the region. The excess heat change is calculated to be of order 50-150 W m(-2). The advective component of the near-surface heat budget is roughly in phase with the surface flux component.