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Schneider, N, Cornuelle BD.  2005.  The forcing of the Pacific decadal oscillation. Journal of Climate. 18:4355-4373.   10.1175/jcli3527.1   AbstractWebsite

The Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), defined as the leading empirical orthogonal function of North Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies, is a widely used index for decadal variability. It is shown that the PDO can be recovered from a reconstruction of North Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies based on a first-order autoregressive model and forcing by variability of the Aleutian low, El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and oceanic zonal advection anomalies in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension. The latter results from oceanic Rossby waves that are forced by North Pacific Ekman pumping. The SST response patterns to these processes are not orthogonal, and they determine the spatial characteristics of the PDO. The importance of the different forcing, processes is frequency dependent. At interannual time scales, forcing from ENSO and the Aleutian low determines the response in equal parts. At decadal time scales, zonal advection in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Extension, ENSO, and anomalies of the Aleutian low each account for similar amounts of the PDO variance. These, results support the hypothesis that the PDO is not a dynamical mode, but arises from the superposition of sea surface temperature fluctuations with different dynamical origins.

Miller, AJ, Cornuelle BD.  1999.  Forecasts from fits of frontal fluctuations. Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans. 29:305-333.   10.1016/s0377-0265(99)00009-3   AbstractWebsite

A primitive equation ocean model is fit with strong constraints to non-synoptic hydrographic surveys in an unstable frontal current region, the Iceland-Faeroe Front. The model is first initialized from a time-independent objective analysis of non-synoptic data (spanning 2 to 6 days). A truncated set of eddy-scale basis functions is used to represent the initial error in temperature, salinity, and velocity. A series of model integrations, each perturbed with one basis function for one dependent variable in one layer, is used to determine the sensitivity to the objective-analysis initial state of the match to the non-synoptic hydrographic data. A new initial condition is then determined from a generalized inverse of the sensitivity matrix and the process is repeated to account for non-linearity. The method is first tested in 'identical twin' experiments to demonstrate the adequacy of the basis functions in representing initial condition error and the convergence of the method to the true solution. The approach is then applied to observations gathered in August 1993 in the Iceland-Faeroe Front. Model fits are successful in improving the match to the true data, leading to dynamically consistent evolution scenarios. However, the forecast skill (here defined as the variance of the model-data differences) of the model runs from the optimized initial condition is not superior to less sophisticated methods of initialization, probably due to inadequate initialization data. The limited verification data in the presence of strong frontal slopes may not be sufficient to establish Forecast skill, so that it must be judged subjectively or evaluated by other quantitative measures. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

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Greenland Sea Project Group.  1990.  Greenland Sea Project: a venture toward improved understanding of the oceans' role in climate. EOS Trans. AGU. 71:750-751and754-755. AbstractWebsite

The Greenland Sea is one of the few major areas where convective renewal of intermediate and deep waters contribute to world-ocean ventilation. Basin-scale cyclonic circulation, boundary currents advecting of Atlantic and Polar origin, mixing across the fronts related to the boundary currents, wintertime heat loss to the atmosphere, ice formulation and related brine release and sequences of penetrative plumes control the renewal. The field work of the Greenland Ice Project began in the summer of 1987. This paper presents and explains the objectives of the Greenland Sea Project and summarizes preliminary results from the first intense field phase which covered the seasonal cycle from summer 1988 to summer 1989. The paper discusses the following: large-scale circulation; convection; circulation and convection variability; exchange across fronts; sea ice; sea ice interactions and copepod life cycles in the European Arctic seas.

Malanotte-Rizzoli, P, Cornuelle B, Haidvogel D.  1982.  Gulf Stream acoustic tomography: modelling simulations. Ocean Modelling. 46:10-15. Abstract
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Wiggins, SM, Dorman LRM, Cornuelle BD, Hildebrand JA.  1996.  Hess Deep rift valley structure from seismic tomography. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 101:22335-22353.   10.1029/96jb01230   AbstractWebsite

We present results from a seismic refraction experiment conducted across the Hess Deep rift valley in the equatorial east Pacific. P wave travel times between seafloor explosions and ocean bottom seismographs are analyzed using an iterative stochastic inverse method to produce a velocity model of the subsurface structure. The resulting velocity model differs from typical young, fast spreading, East Pacific Rise crust by approximately +/-1 km/s with slow velocities beneath the valley of the deep and a fast region forming the intrarift ridge. We interpret these velocity contrasts as lithologies originating at different depths and/or alteration of the preexisting rock units. We use our seismic model, along with petrologic and bathymetric data from previous studies, to produce a structural model. The model supports low-angle detachment faulting with serpentinization of peridotite as the preferred mechanism for creating the distribution and exposure of lower crustal and upper mantle rocks within Hess Deep.

Cornuelle, B, Howe BM.  1987.  High Spatial-Resolution in Vertical Slice Ocean Acoustic Tomography. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 92:11680-11692.   10.1029/JC092iC11p11680   AbstractWebsite

Most studies of ocean acoustic tomography have assumed that little horizontal information is available from the many acoustic multipath travel times observed in a single vertical plane (slice) between source and receiver moorings. There is in fact significant small-scale information present in such data sets. We examine single vertical slice tomography in spectral terms, and show that the acoustic measurements resemble a high-pass filter, which is more sensitive to small scales (shorter than 100 km) than to longer scales, with the exception of the mean, which is well measured. The sensitivity extends to scales smaller than 10 km, in theory, although the level of the ocean energy spectrum is so low at these scales that even small data errors limit the measurement. We use analytical calculations supplemented by numerical simulations with realistic data sets to show that accurate reconstructions of the high wave number features are possible out to the limits of the parameterization (9.2-km wavelength) when the power spectrum of the ocean features is white or red, the total measurement error is 1 ms, and multiple receivers are used. The ultimate limit of spatial resolution may be smaller still, depending on array configuration, measurement errors, and the shape of the power spectrum.

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Hoteit, I, Cornuelle B, Thierry V, Stammer D.  2008.  Impact of resolution and optimized ECCO forcing on Simulations of the tropical pacific. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 25:131-147.   10.1175/2007jtecho528.1   AbstractWebsite

The sensitivity of the dynamics of a tropical Pacific Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) general circulation model (MITgcm) to the surface forcing fields and to the horizontal resolution is analyzed. During runs covering the period 1992-2002, two different sets of surface forcing boundary conditions are used, obtained 1) from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis project and 2) from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) assimilation consortium. The "ECCO forcing" is the "NCEP forcing" adjusted by a state estimation procedure using the MITgcm with a 1 degrees x 1 degrees global grid and the adjoint method assimilating a multivariate global ocean dataset. The skill of the model is evaluated against ocean observations available in situ and from satellites. The model domain is limited to the tropical Pacific, with open boundaries located along 26 degrees S, 26 degrees N, and in the Indonesian throughflow. To account for large-scale changes of the ocean circulation, the model is nested in the global time-varying ocean state provided by the ECCO consortium on a 1 grid. Increasing the spatial resolution to 1/3 degrees and using the ECCO forcing fields significantly improves many aspects of the circulation but produces overly strong currents in the western model domain. Increasing the resolution to 1/6 degrees does not yield further improvements of model results. Using the ECCO heat and freshwater fluxes in place of NCEP products leads to improved time-mean model skill (i.e., reduced biases) over most of the model domain, underlining the important role of adjusted heat and freshwater fluxes for improving model representations of the tropical Pacific. Combinations of ECCO and NCEP wind forcing fields can improve certain aspects of the model solutions, but neither ECCO nor NCEP winds show clear overall superiority.

Furue, R, Jia YL, McCreary JP, Schneider N, Richards KJ, Muller P, Cornuelle BD, Avellaneda NM, Stammer D, Liu CY, Kohl A.  2015.  Impacts of regional mixing on the temperature structure of the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Part 1: Vertically uniform vertical diffusion. Ocean Modelling. 91:91-111.   10.1016/j.ocemod.2014.10.002   AbstractWebsite

We investigate the sensitivity of numerical model solutions to regional changes in vertical diffusion. Specifically, we vary the background diffusion coefficient, kappa(b), within spatially distinct subregions of the tropical Pacific, assess the impacts of those changes, and diagnose the processes that account for them. Solutions respond to a diffusion anomaly, delta kappa(b), in three ways. Initially, there is a fast response (several months), due to the interaction of rapidly propagating, barotropic and gravity waves with eddies and other mesoscale features. It is followed by a local response (roughly one year), the initial growth and spatial pattern of which can be explained by one-dimensional (vertical) diffusion. At this stage, temperature and salinity anomalies are generated that are either associated with a change in density ("dynamical" anomalies) or without one ("spiciness" anomalies). In a final adjustment stage, the dynamical and spiciness anomalies spread to remote regions by radiation of Rossby and Kelvin waves and by advection, respectively. In near equilibrium solutions, dynamical anomalies are generally much larger in the latitude band of the forcing, but the impact of off equatorial forcing by delta kappa(b) on the equatorial temperature structure is still significant. Spiciness anomalies spread equator ward within the pycnocline, where they are carried to the equator as part of the subsurface branch of the Pacific Subtropical Cells, and spiciness also extends to the equator via western-boundary currents. Forcing near and at the equator generates strong dynamical anomalies, and sometimes additional spiciness anomalies, at pycnocline depths. The total response of the equatorial temperature structure to delta kappa(b) in various regions depends on the strength and spatial pattern of the generation of each signal within the forcing region as well as On the processes of its spreading to the equator.

Gaillard, F, Cornuelle B.  1987.  Improvement of Tomographic Maps by Using Surface-Reflected Rays. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 17:1458-1467.   10.1175/1520-0485(1987)017<1458:iotmbu>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The results of the experiment conducted in the northwest Atlantic in 1981 have demonstrated the possibilities of acoustic tomography. The first maps, based only on purely refracted rays, showed the evolution of a cold eddy, confirmed by direct measurement of temperature and salinity. A more complete use of the 1981 dataset, with incorporation of surface-reflected rays, is proposed here. The addition of new data reduces the statistical error on the estimation of the sound speed field. Resolution at levels already well estimated in the earlier computations is improved, and individual maps exhibit a better continuity. Information is now available about the average properties of the upper layers of the ocean, which could not be monitored with purely refracted rays.

Mazloff, MR, Gille ST, Cornuelle B.  2014.  Improving the geoid: Combining altimetry and mean dynamic topography in the California coastal ocean. Geophysical Research Letters. 41:8944-8952.   10.1002/2014gl062402   AbstractWebsite

Satellite gravity mapping missions, altimeters, and other platforms have allowed the Earth's geoid to be mapped over the ocean to a horizontal resolution of approximately 100km with an uncertainty of less than 10cm. At finer resolution this uncertainty increases to greater than 10cm. Achieving greater accuracy requires accurate estimates of the dynamic ocean topography (DOT). In this study two DOT estimates for the California Current System with uncertainties less than 10cm are used to solve for a geoid correction field. The derived field increases the consistency between the DOTs and along-track altimetric observations, suggesting it is a useful correction to the gravitational field. The correction is large compared to the dynamic ocean topography, with a magnitude of 15cm and significant structure, especially near the coast. The results are evidence that modern high-resolution dynamic ocean topography products can be used to improve estimates of the geoid.

Sutton, P, Morawitz WML, Cornuelle BD, Masters G, Worcester PF.  1994.  Incorporation of Acoustic Normal-Mode Data Into Tomographic Inversions in the Greenland Sea. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 99:12487-12502.   10.1029/94jc00210   AbstractWebsite

Acoustic normal mode group velocity data are extracted from tomographic receptions in the Greenland Sea using a combination of spatial filtering with data from a six-element hydrophone array and variable time windowing. The mode group velocity data, together with ray travel time data, are used in inversions to obtain the range average sound speed profile. The modal data significantly improve near-surface resolution, which is where the largest oceanographic signals occur. Inverse results using only acoustic data are consistent with point measurements, a Seasoar section, and sparse conductivity-temperature-depth data.

Sarkar, J, Cornuelle BD, Kuperman WA.  2011.  Information and linearity of time-domain complex demodulated amplitude and phase data in shallow water. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 130:1242-1252.   10.1121/1.3613709   AbstractWebsite

Wave-theoretic ocean acoustic propagation modeling is used to derive the sensitivity of pressure, and complex demodulated amplitude and phase, at a receiver to the sound speed of the medium using the Born-Frechet derivative. Although the procedure can be applied for pressure as a function of frequency instead of time, the time domain has advantages in practical problems, as linearity and signal-to-noise are more easily assigned in the time domain. The linearity and information content of these sensitivity kernels is explored for an example of a 3-4 kHz broadband pulse transmission in a 1 km shallow water Pekeris waveguide. Full-wave observations (pressure as a function of time) are seen to be too nonlinear for use in most practical cases, whereas envelope and phase data have a wider range of validity and provide complementary information. These results are used in simulated inversions with a more realistic sound speed profile, comparing the performance of amplitude and phase observations. (C) 2011 Acoustical Society of America. [DOI: 10.1121/1.3613709]

Send, U, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Tiemann CO, Baschek B.  2002.  Integral measurements of mass transport and heat content in the Strait of Gibraltar from acoustic transmissions. Deep-Sea Research Part Ii-Topical Studies in Oceanography. 49:4069-4095.   10.1016/s0967-0645(02)00143-1   AbstractWebsite

Three 2 kHz acoustic transceivers were deployed on either side of the eastern entrance of the Strait of Gibraltar during April-May 1996 to determine the feasibility of using acoustic methods to make routine, rapidly repeated, horizontally integrated measurements of flow and temperature in straits. Reciprocal transmissions between the transceivers were used to test the feasibility of using traditional ray differential travel times to monitor the component of flow along the acoustic paths. Transmissions directly across the Strait were used to test the feasibility of using horizontal arrival angle fluctuations and acoustic intensity scintillations to monitor the flow perpendicular to the acoustic path. The geometry was selected to provide ray paths that only sample the lower-layer Mediterranean water, so that the feasibility of monitoring the Mediterranean outflow using the various methods could be evaluated. The acoustic scintillation method did not yield useful current estimates, but the experimental parameters were not optimized for this approach. Since the low-frequency variability in log-amplitude was found to be highly correlated at receivers 228 m apart, it is possible that acoustic scintillation measurements using different receiver spacings and more rapid sampling might yield better results. The horizontal deflection method gave encouraging results at the time of neap tides, but less so during spring tides. For this approach, both theoretical estimates and measured phase differences between the horizontally separated receivers suggest that internal-wave-induced horizontal arrival angle fluctuations may fundamentally limit the precision with which arrival angles can be measured. Further work is needed to determine if a smaller horizontal spacing and higher signal-to-noise ratios would yield better results. Reciprocal travel time measurements diagonally across the Strait performed the best of the three methods, giving absolute flow estimates consistent with those derived from current-meter data. The fractional uncertainty variance for the lower layer tidal transport from a single tomographic path was estimated to be 0.017 (i.e. 98% of the a priori tidal transport variance was resolved). The spatial scales of the sub-tidal flow are thought to be significantly shorter than those of the tidal flow, however, which means that a more elaborate monitoring network is required to achieve the same performance for sub-tidal variability. Finally, sum travel times from the reciprocal transmissions were found to provide good measurements of the temperature and heat content in the lower layer. (C) 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

Kohl, A, Stammer D, Cornuelle B.  2007.  Interannual to decadal changes in the ECCO global synthesis. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 37:313-337.   10.1175/jpo3014.1   AbstractWebsite

An estimate of the time-varying global ocean circulation for the period 1992 - 2002 was obtained by combining most of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment ( WOCE) ocean datasets with a general circulation model on a 1 horizontal grid. The estimate exactly satisfies the model equations without artificial sources or sinks of momentum, heat, and freshwater. To bring the model into agreement with observations, its initial temperature and salinity conditions were permitted to change, as were the time-dependent surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and freshwater. The estimation of these "control variables" is largely consistent with accepted uncertainties in the hydrographic climatology and meteorological analyses. The estimated time-mean horizontal transports of volume, heat, and freshwater, which were largely underestimated in the previous 2 optimization performed by Stammer et al., have converged with time-independent estimates from box inversions over most parts of the World Ocean. Trends in the model's heat content are 7% larger than those reported by Levitus and correspond to a global net heat uptake of about 1.1 W m(-2) over the model domain. The associated model trend in sea surface height over the estimation period resembles the observations from Ocean Topography Experiment ( TOPEX)/Poseidon over most of the global ocean. Sea surface height changes in the model are primarily steric but show contributions from mass redistributions from the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean to the subtropical Pacific Ocean gyres. Steric contributions are primarily temperature based but are partly compensated by salt variation. However, the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean reveal a clear contribution of salt to large-scale sea level variations.

Willis, JK, Roemmich D, Cornuelle B.  2004.  Interannual variability in upper ocean heat content, temperature, and thermosteric expansion on global scales. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 109   10.1029/2003jc002260   AbstractWebsite

[1] Satellite altimetric height was combined with approximately 1,000,000 in situ temperature profiles to produce global estimates of upper ocean heat content, temperature, and thermosteric sea level variability on interannual timescales. Maps of these quantities from mid-1993 through mid-2003 were calculated using the technique developed by Willis et al. [ 2003]. The time series of globally averaged heat content contains a small amount of interannual variability and implies an oceanic warming rate of 0.86 +/- 0.12 watts per square meter of ocean (0.29 +/- 0.04 pW) from 1993 to 2003 for the upper 750 m of the water column. As a result of the warming, thermosteric sea level rose at a rate of 1.6 +/- 0.3 mm/yr over the same time period. Maps of yearly heat content anomaly show patterns of warming commensurate with ENSO variability in the tropics, but also show that a large part of the trend in global, oceanic heat content is caused by regional warming at midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition to quantifying interannual variability on a global scale, this work illustrates the importance of maintaining continuously updated monitoring systems that provide global coverage of the world's oceans. Ongoing projects, such as the Jason/TOPEX series of satellite altimeters and the Argo float program, provide a critical foundation for characterizing variability on regional, basin, and global scales and quantifying the oceans' role as part of the climate system.

Wolfe, CL, Cessi P, Cornuelle BD.  2017.  An intrinsic mode of interannual variability in the Indian Ocean. Journal of Physical Oceanography. 47:701-719.   10.1175/jpo-d-16-0177.1   AbstractWebsite

An intrinsic mode of self-sustained, interannual variability is identified in a coarse-resolution ocean model forced by an annually repeating atmospheric state. The variability has maximumloading in the Indian Ocean, with a significant projection into the South Atlantic Ocean. It is argued that this intrinsic mode is caused by baroclinic instability of the model's Leeuwin Current, which radiates out to the tropical Indian and South Atlantic Oceans as long Rossby waves at a period of 4 yr. This previously undescribed mode has a remarkably narrowband time series. However, the variability is not synchronized with the annual cycle; the phase of the oscillation varies chaotically on decadal time scales. The presence of this internal mode reduces the predictability of the ocean circulation by obscuring the response to forcing or initial condition perturbations. The signature of this mode can be seen in higher-resolution global ocean models driven by high-frequency atmospheric forcing, but altimeter and assimilation analyses do not show obvious signatures of such a mode, perhaps because of insufficient duration.

Muccino, JC, Arango HG, Bennett AF, Chua BS, Cornuelle BD, Di Lorenzo E, Egbert GD, Haidvogel D, Levin JC, Luo H, Miller AJ, Moore AA, Zaron ED.  2008.  The Inverse Ocean Modeling system. Part II: Applications. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 25:1623-1637.   10.1175/2008jtecho522.1   AbstractWebsite

The Inverse Ocean Modeling (IOM) System is a modular system for constructing and running weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation (W4DVAR) for any linear or nonlinear functionally, smooth dynamical model and observing array. The IOM has been applied to four ocean models with widely varying characteristics. The Primitive Equations Z-coordinate-Harmonic Analysis of Tides (PEZ-HAT) and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) are three-dimensional, primitive equations models while the Advanced Circulation model in 2D (ADCIRC-2D) and Spectral Element Ocean Model in 2D (SEOM-2D) are shallow-water models belonging to the general finite-element family. These models. in conjunction with the IOM, have been used to investigate a wide variety of scientific phenomena including tidal. mesoscale, and wind-driven circulation. In all cases, the assimilation of data using the IOM provides a better estimate of the ocean state than the model alone.

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Hammer, PTC, Dorman LM, Hildebrand JA, Cornuelle BD.  1994.  Jasper Seamount Structure - Seafloor Seismic Refraction Tomography. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 99:6731-6752.   10.1029/93jb02170   AbstractWebsite

The velocity structure of Jasper Seamount was modeled using one- and three-dimensional inversions of P wave travel times. The results represent the first detailed seismic images of a submerged, intraplate volcano. Two seismic refraction experiments were completed on Jasper Seamount, incorporating ocean bottom seismometers and navigated seafloor shots. The P wave travel times were first used to compute a one-dimensional velocity profile which served as a starting model for a three-dimensional tomographic inversion. The seamount P velocities are significantly slower than those observed in typical oceanic crust at equivalent subbasement depths. This suggests that Jasper Seamount is constructed predominantly of extrusive lavas with high average porosity. The velocity models confirm morphological predictions: Jasper Seamount is a shield volcano with rift zone development. High seismic velocities were detected beneath the large radial ridges while low velocities characterize the shallow summit and flanks. Comparisons between P velocity models of Jasper Seamount and the island of Hawaii reveal that these two shield volcanoes are not structurally proportional. Jasper Seamount is far smaller than Hawaii, yet both volcanoes exhibit an outer extrusive layer of similar thickness. This suggests that seamount size influences the intrusive/extrusive proportions; density equilibrium between melt and country rock may explain this behavior.

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Lien, RC, Ma B, Lee CM, Sanford TB, Mensah V, Centurioni LR, Cornuelle BD, Gopalakrishnan G, Gordon AL, Chang MH, Jayne SR, Yang YJ.  2015.  The Kuroshio and Luzon undercurrent east of Luzon Island. Oceanography. 28:54-63.   10.5670/oceanog.2015.81   AbstractWebsite

Current structure, transport, and water mass properties of the northward-flowing Kuroshio and the southward-flowing Luzon Undercurrent (LU) were observed for nearly one year, June 8, 2012-June 4, 2013, across the Kuroshio path at 18.75 degrees N. Observations were made from four platforms: an array of six subsurface ADCP moorings, two Seagliders, fivepressure inverted echo sounders (PIES), and five horizontal electric field (HEF) sensors, providing the most detailed time series of the Kuroshio and Luzon Undercurrent water properties to date. Ocean state estimates of the western boundary current system were performed using the MIT general circulation model-four-dimensional variational assimilation (MITgcm-4D-Var) system. Prominent Kuroshio features from observations are simulated well by the numerical model. Annual mean Kuroshio transport, averaged over all platforms, is similar to 16 Sv with a standard deviation similar to 4 Sv. Kuroshio and LU transports and water mass pathways east of Luzon are revealed by Seaglider measurements. In a layer above the salinity maximum associated with North Pacific Tropical Water (NPTW), Kuroshio transport is similar to 7 Sv and contains North Equatorial Current (NEC) and Western Philippine Sea (WPS) waters, with an insignificant amount of South China Sea water on the shallow western flank. In an intermediate layer containing the core of the NPTW, Kuroshio transport is similar to 10 Sv, consisting mostly of NEC water. In the lower layer of the Kuroshio, transport is similar to 1.5 Sv of mostly North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) as a part of WPS waters. Annual mean Luzon Undercurrent southward transport integrated to 1,000 m depth is similar to 2.7 Sv with a standard deviation similar to 2 Sv, carrying solely WPS waters below the salinity minimum of the NPIW. The transport of the western boundary current integrated over the full ocean depth east of Luzon Island is similar to 14 +/- 4.5 Sv. Sources of the water masses in the Kuroshio and Luzon Undercurrent are confirmed qualitatively by the numerical model.

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Subramanian, AC, Hoteit I, Cornuelle B, Miller AJ, Song H.  2012.  Linear versus Nonlinear Filtering with Scale-Selective Corrections for Balanced Dynamics in a Simple Atmospheric Model. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 69:3405-3419.   10.1175/JAS-D-11-0332.1   AbstractWebsite

This paper investigates the role of the linear analysis step of the ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) in disrupting the balanced dynamics in a simple atmospheric model and compares it to a fully nonlinear particle-based filter (PF). The filters have a very similar forecast step but the analysis step of the PF solves the full Bayesian filtering problem while the EnKF analysis only applies to Gaussian distributions. The EnKF is compared to two flavors of the particle filter with different sampling strategies, the sequential importance resampling filter (SIRF) and the sequential kernel resampling filter (SKRF). The model admits a chaotic vortical mode coupled to a comparatively fast gravity wave mode. It can also be configured either to evolve on a so-called slow manifold, where the fast motion is suppressed, or such that the fast-varying variables are diagnosed from the slow-varying variables as slaved modes. Identical twin experiments show that EnKF and PF capture the variables on the slow manifold well as the dynamics is very stable. PFs, especially the SKRF, capture slaved modes better than the EnKF, implying that a full Bayesian analysis estimates the nonlinear model variables better. The PFs perform significantly better in the fully coupled nonlinear model where fast and slow variables modulate each other. This suggests that the analysis step in the PFs maintains the balance in both variables much better than the EnKF. It is also shown that increasing the ensemble size generally improves the performance of the PFs but has less impact on the EnKF after a sufficient number of members have been used.

Orsi, AJ, Cornuelle BD, Severinghaus JP.  2012.  Little Ice Age cold interval in West Antarctica: Evidence from borehole temperature at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide. Geophysical Research Letters. 39   10.1029/2012gl051260   AbstractWebsite

The largest climate anomaly of the last 1000 years in the Northern Hemisphere was the Little Ice Age (LIA) from 1400-1850 C. E., but little is known about the signature of this event in the Southern Hemisphere, especially in Antarctica. We present temperature data from a 300 m borehole at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide. Results show that WAIS Divide was colder than the last 1000-year average from 1300 to 1800 C.E. The temperature in the time period 1400-1800 C.E. was on average 0.52 +/- 0.28 degrees C colder than the last 100-year average. This amplitude is about half of that seen at Greenland Summit (GRIP). This result is consistent with the idea that the LIA was a global event, probably caused by a change in solar and volcanic forcing, and was not simply a seesaw-type redistribution of heat between the hemispheres as would be predicted by some ocean-circulation hypotheses. The difference in the magnitude of the LIA between Greenland and West Antarctica suggests that the feedbacks amplifying the radiative forcing may not operate in the same way in both regions. Citation: Orsi, A. J., B. D. Cornuelle, and J. P. Severinghaus (2012), Little Ice Age cold interval in West Antarctica: Evidence from borehole temperature at the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L09710, doi: 10.1029/2012GL051260.

Skarsoulis, EK, Cornuelle BD, Dzieciuch MA.  2013.  Long-range asymptotic behavior of vertical travel-time sensitivity kernels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 134:3201-3210.   10.1121/1.4818785   AbstractWebsite

Vertical travel-time sensitivity kernels (VTSKs) describe the effect of horizontally uniform sound-speed changes on travel times in range-independent ocean environments. Wave-theoretic VTSKs can be obtained either analytically, through perturbation of the normal-mode representation, or numerically, as horizontal marginals of the corresponding two-dimensional and three-dimensional travel-time sensitivity kernels. In previous works, it has been observed that wave-theoretic finite-frequency VTSKs approach the corresponding ray-theoretic sensitivity kernels as the propagation range increases. The present work is an attempt to explain this behavior. A stationary-phase approach is used to obtain a long-range asymptotic expression for the wave-theoretic VTSKs. The resulting asymptotic VTSKs are very close to the corresponding ray-theoretic ones. The smoothness condition, required for the stationary-phase approximation to hold, is used to obtain an estimate for the range beyond which the asymptotic behavior sets in. (C) 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

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Orsi, AJ, Cornuelle BD, Severinghaus JP.  2014.  Magnitude and temporal evolution of Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8 abrupt temperature change inferred from nitrogen and argon isotopes in GISP2 ice using a new least-squares inversion. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 395:81-90.   10.1016/j.epsl.2014.03.030   AbstractWebsite

Polar temperature is often inferred from water isotopes in ice cores. However, non-temperature effects on 3180 are important during the abrupt events of the last glacial period, such as changes in the seasonality of precipitation, the northward movement of the storm track, and the increase in accumulation. These effects complicate the interpretation of 8180 as a temperature proxy. Here, we present an independent surface temperature reconstruction, which allows us to test the relationship between delta O-18(ice) and temperature, during Dansgaard-Oeschger event 8, 38.2 thousand yrs ago using new delta N-15 and delta Ar-40 data from the GISP2 ice core in Greenland. This temperature reconstruction relies on a new inversion of inert gas isotope data using generalized least-squares, and includes a robust uncertainty estimation. We find that both temperature and delta O-18 increased in two steps of 20 and 140 yrs, with an overall amplitude of 11.80 +/- 1.8 degrees C between the stadial and interstadial centennial-mean temperature. The coefficient alpha = d delta O-18/dT changes with each time-segment, which shows that non-temperature sources of fractionation have a significant contribution to the delta O-18 signal. When measured on century-averaged values, we find that alpha = d delta O-18/dT = 0.32 +/- 0.06%(0)/degrees C, which is similar to the glacial/Holocene value of 0.328%(o)/degrees C. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Kim, SY, Terrill EJ, Cornuelle BD.  2008.  Mapping surface currents from HF radar radial velocity measurements using optimal interpolation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 113   10.1029/2007jc004244   AbstractWebsite

An optimal interpolation (OI) method to compute surface vector current fields from radial velocity measurements derived from high-frequency (HF) radars is presented. The method assumes a smooth spatial covariance relationship between neighboring vector currents, in contrast to the more commonly used un-weighted least-squares fitting (UWLS) method, which assumes a constant vector velocity within a defined search radius. This OI method can directly compute any quantities linearly related to the radial velocities, such as vector currents and dynamic quantities (divergence and vorticity) as well as the uncertainties of those respective fields. The OI method is found to be more stable than the UWLS method and reduces spurious vector solutions near the baselines between HF radar installations. The OI method produces a covariance of the uncertainty of the estimated vector current fields. Three nondimensional uncertainty indices are introduced to characterize the uncertainty of the vector current at a point, representing an ellipse with directional characteristics. The vector current estimation using the OI method eliminates the need for multiple mapping steps and optimally fills intermittent coverage gaps. The effects of angular interpolation of radial velocities, a commonly used step in the preprocessing of radial velocity data prior to vector current computation in the UWLS method, are presented.

Kim, SY, Terrill EJ, Cornuelle BD, Jones B, Washburn L, Moline MA, Paduan JD, Garfield N, Largier JL, Crawford G, Kosro PM.  2011.  Mapping the U.S. West Coast surface circulation: A multiyear analysis of high-frequency radar observations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 116   10.1029/2010jc006669   AbstractWebsite

The nearly completed U. S. West Coast (USWC) high-frequency radar (HFR) network provides an unprecedented capability to monitor and understand coastal ocean dynamics and phenomenology through hourly surface current measurements at up to 1 km resolution. The dynamics of the surface currents off the USWC are governed by tides, winds, Coriolis force, low-frequency pressure gradients (less than 0.4 cycles per day (cpd)), and nonlinear interactions of those forces. Alongshore surface currents show poleward propagating signals with phase speeds of O(10) and O(100 to 300) km day(-1) and time scales of 2 to 3 weeks. The signals with slow phase speed are only observed in southern California. It is hypothesized that they are scattered and reflected by shoreline curvature and bathymetry change and do not penetrate north of Point Conception. The seasonal transition of alongshore surface circulation forced by upwelling-favorable winds and their relaxation is captured in fine detail. Submesoscale eddies, identified using flow geometry, have Rossby numbers of 0.1 to 3, diameters in the range of 10 to 60 km, and persistence for 2 to 12 days. The HFR surface currents resolve coastal surface ocean variability continuously across scales from submesoscale to mesoscale (O(1) km to O(1000) km). Their spectra decay with k(-2) at high wave number (less than 100 km) in agreement with theoretical submesoscale spectra below the observational limits of present-day satellite altimeters.