Publications

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2013
Roux, P, Kuperman WA, Cornuelle BD, Aulanier F, Hodgkiss WS, Song HC.  2013.  Analyzing sound speed fluctuations in shallow water from group-velocity versus phase-velocity data representation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 133:1945-1952.   10.1121/1.4792354   AbstractWebsite

Data collected over more than eight consecutive hours between two source-receiver arrays in a shallow water environment are analyzed through the physics of the waveguide invariant. In particular, the use of vertical arrays on both the source and receiver sides provides source and receiver angles in addition to travel-times associated with a set of eigenray paths in the waveguide. From the travel-times and the source-receiver angles, the eigenrays are projected into a group-velocity versus phase-velocity (Vg-Vp) plot for each acquisition. The time evolution of the Vg-Vp representation over the 8.5-h long experiment is discussed. Group speed fluctuations observed for a set of eigenrays with turning points at different depths in the water column are compared to the Brunt-Vaisala frequency. (C) 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

Dzieciuch, MA, Cornuelle BD, Skarsoulis EK.  2013.  Structure and stability of wave-theoretic kernels in the ocean. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 134:3318-3331.   10.1121/1.4818846   AbstractWebsite

Wave-theoretic modeling can be applied to obtain travel-time sensitivity kernels (TSKs) representing the amount ray travel times are affected by sound-speed variations anywhere in the medium. This work explores the spatial frequency content of the TSK compared to expected ocean variability. It also examines the stability of the TSK in environments that produce strong sensitivity of ray paths to initial conditions. The conclusion is that the linear TSK model is an effective predictor of travel-time changes and that the rays perform nearly as well as the full-wave kernel. The TSK is examined in physical space and in wavenumber space, and it is found that this is the key to understanding how the travel time reacts to ocean perturbations. There are minimum vertical and horizontal length scales of ocean perturbations that are required for the travel time to be affected. The result is that the correspondence between true travel times and those calculated from the kernel is high for large-scale perturbations and somewhat less for the small scales. This demonstrates the validity of ray-based inversion of travel time observations for the cases under study. (C) 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

1992
Duda, TF, Flatte SM, Colosi JA, Cornuelle BD, Hildebrand JA, Hodgkiss WS, Worcester PF, Howe BM, Mercer JA, Spindel RC.  1992.  Measured Wave-Front Fluctuations in 1000-Km Pulse-Propagation in the Pacific-Ocean. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 92:939-955.   10.1121/1.403964   AbstractWebsite

A 1000-km acoustical transmission experiment has been carried out in the North Pacific, with Pulses broadcast between a moored broadband source (250-Hz center frequency) and a moored sparse vertical line of receivers. Two data records are reported: a period of 9 days at a pulse rate of one per hour, and a 21 -h period on the seventh day at six per hour. Many wave-front segments were observed at each hydrophone depth, and arrival times were tracked and studied as functions of time and depth. Arrivals within the final section of the pulse are not trackable in time or space at the chosen sampling rates, however. Broadband fluctuations, which are uncorrelated over 10-min sampling and 60-m vertical spacing, are observed with about 40 (ms)2 variance. The variance of all other fluctuations (denoted as low-frequency) is comparable or smaller than the broadband value; this low-frequency variance can be separated into two parts: a wave-front segment displacement (with vertical correlation length greater than 1 km) that varies substantially between rays with different ray identifiers, and a distortion (with vertical correlation length between 60 m and 1 km) of about 2 (ms)2 variance. The low-frequency variance may be explained as the effect of internal waves, including internal tides. The variance of the broadband fluctuations is reduced somewhat but not eliminated if only high-intensity peaks are selected; this selection does not affect the statistics of the low-frequency fluctuations.