Publications

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2017
Sagen, H, Worcester PF, Dzieciuch MA, Geyer F, Sandven S, Babiker M, Beszczynska-Moller A, Dushaw BD, Cornuelle B.  2017.  Resolution, identification, and stability of broadband acoustic arrivals in Fram Strait. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 141:2055-2068.   10.1121/1.4978780   AbstractWebsite

An ocean acoustic tomography system consisting of three moorings with low frequency, broad-band transceivers and a moored receiver located approximately in the center of the triangle formed by the transceivers was installed in the central, deep-water part of Fram Strait during 2010-2012. Comparisons of the acoustic receptions with predictions based on hydrographic sections show that the oceanographic conditions in Fram Strait result in complex arrival patterns in which it is difficult to resolve and identify individual arrivals. In addition, the early arrivals are unstable, with the arrival structures changing significantly over time. The stability parameter a suggests that the instability is likely not due to small-scale variability, but rather points toward strong mesoscale variability in the presence of a relatively weak sound channel as being largely responsible. The estimator-correlator [Dzieciuch, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 136, 2512-2522 (2014)] is shown to provide an objective formalism for generating travel-time series given the complex propagation conditions. Because travel times obtained from the estimator-correlator are not associated with resolved, identified ray arrivals, inverse methods are needed that do not use sampling kernels constructed from geometric ray paths. One possible approach would be to use travel-time sensitivity kernels constructed for the estimator-correlator outputs. (C) 2017 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.

2013
Colosi, JA, Van Uffelen LJ, Cornuelle BD, Dzieciuch MA, Worcester PF, Dushaw BD, Ramp SR.  2013.  Observations of sound-speed fluctuations in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 134:3185-3200.   10.1121/1.4818784   AbstractWebsite

As an aid to understanding long-range acoustic propagation in the Philippine Sea, statistical and phenomenological descriptions of sound-speed variations were developed. Two moorings of oceanographic sensors located in the western Philippine Sea in the spring of 2009 were used to track constant potential-density surfaces (isopycnals) and constant potential-temperature surfaces (isotherms) in the depth range 120-2000 m. The vertical displacements of these surfaces are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from internal waves, while temperature/salinity variability along isopycnals are used to estimate sound-speed fluctuations from intrusive structure often termed spice. Frequency spectra and vertical covariance functions are used to describe the space-time scales of the displacements and spiciness. Internal-wave contributions from diurnal and semi-diurnal internal tides and the diffuse internal-wave field [related to the Garrett-Munk (GM) spectrum] are found to dominate the sound-speed variability. Spice fluctuations are weak in comparison. The internal wave and spice frequency spectra have similar form in the upper ocean but are markedly different below 170-m depth. Diffuse internal-wave mode spectra show a form similar to the GM model, while internal-tide mode spectra scale as mode number to the minus two power. Spice decorrelates rapidly with depth, with a typical correlation scale of tens of meters.

Powell, BS, Kerry CG, Cornuelle BD.  2013.  Using a numerical model to understand the connection between the ocean and acoustic travel-time measurements. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 134:3211-3222.   10.1121/1.4818786   AbstractWebsite

Measurements of acoustic ray travel-times in the ocean provide synoptic integrals of the ocean state between source and receiver. It is known that the ray travel-time is sensitive to variations in the ocean at the transmission time, but the sensitivity of the travel-time to spatial variations in the ocean prior to the acoustic transmission have not been quantified. This study examines the sensitivity of ray travel-time to the temporally and spatially evolving ocean state in the Philippine Sea using the adjoint of a numerical model. A one year series of five day backward integrations of the adjoint model quantify the sensitivity of travel-times to varying dynamics that can alter the travel-time of a 611 km ray by 200 ms. The early evolution of the sensitivities reveals high-mode internal waves that dissipate quickly, leaving the lowest three modes, providing a connection to variations in the internal tide generation prior to the sample time. They are also strongly sensitive to advective effects that alter density along the ray path. These sensitivities reveal how travel-time measurements are affected by both nearby and distant waters. Temporal nonlinearity of the sensitivities suggests that prior knowledge of the ocean state is necessary to exploit the travel-time observations. (C) 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

2012
Sarkar, J, Marandet C, Roux P, Walker S, Cornuelle BD, Kuperman WA.  2012.  Sensitivity kernel for surface scattering in a waveguide. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 131:111-118.   10.1121/1.3665999   AbstractWebsite

Using the Born approximation, a linearized sensitivity kernel is derived to describe the relationship between a local change at the free surface and its effect on the acoustic propagation in the water column. The structure of the surface scattering kernel is investigated numerically and experimentally for the case of a waveguide at the ultrasonic scale. To better demonstrate the sensitivity of the multipath propagation to the introduction of a localized perturbation at the air-water interface, the kernel is formulated both in terms of point-to-point and beam-to-beam representations. Agreement between theory and experiment suggests applications to sensitivity analysis of the wavefield for sea surface perturbations. (C) 2012 Acoustical Society of America. [DOI: 10.1121/1.3665999]

Colosi, JA, Duda TF, Lin YT, Lynch JF, Newhall AE, Cornuelle BD.  2012.  Observations of sound-speed fluctuations on the New Jersey continental shelf in the summer of 2006. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 131:1733-1748.   10.1121/1.3666014   AbstractWebsite

Environmental sensors moored on the New Jersey continental shelf tracked constant density surfaces (isopycnals) for 35 days in the summer of 2006. Sound-speed fluctuations from internal-wave vertical isopycnal displacements and from temperature/salinity variability along isopycnals (spiciness) are analyzed using frequency spectra and vertical covariance functions. Three varieties of internal waves are studied: Diffuse broadband internal waves (akin to waves fitting the deep water Garrett/Munk spectrum), internal tides, and, to a lesser extent, nonlinear internal waves. These internal-wave contributions are approximately distinct in the frequency domain. It is found that in the main thermocline spicy thermohaline structure dominates the root mean square sound-speed variability, with smaller contributions coming from (in order) nonlinear internal waves, diffuse internal waves, and internal tides. The frequency spectra of internal-wave displacements and of spiciness have similar form, likely due to the advection of variable-spiciness water masses by horizontal internal-wave currents, although there are technical limitations to the observations at high frequency. In the low-frequency, internal-wave band the internal-wave spectrum follows frequency to the -1.81 power, whereas the spice spectrum shows a -1.73 power. Mode spectra estimated via covariance methods show that the diffuse internal-wave spectrum has a smaller mode bandwidth than Garrett/Munk and that the internal tide has significant energy in modes one through three. (C) 2012 Acoustical Society of America. [DOI: 10.1121/1.3666014]

2011
Skarsoulis, EK, Cornuelle BD, Dzieciuch MA.  2011.  Second-Order Sensitivity of Acoustic Travel Times to Sound Speed Perturbations. Acta Acustica United with Acustica. 97:533-543.   10.3813/aaa.918434   AbstractWebsite

The second-order sensitivity of finite-frequency acoustic travel times to sound speed perturbations in range-independent environments is studied. Using the notion of peak arrivals and the normal-mode representation of the Green's function first- and second-order perturbation expressions are derived for the travel times in terms of the underlying perturbations in the Green's function and finally in the sound speed profile. The resulting theoretical expressions are numerically validated. Assuming small and local perturbations the non-linear effects appear to be strongest for sound speed perturbations taking place close to the lower turning depths of the corresponding eigenrays. At the upper turning depths - in the case of temperate propagation conditions - the effects are much weaker due to the larger sound speed gradients. The magnitude of the second-order sensitivity of travel times relative to the first-order sensitivity can be used to obtain an estimate for the limits of linearity.

2004
Skarsoulis, EK, Cornuelle BD.  2004.  Travel-time sensitivity kernels in ocean acoustic tomography. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 116:227-238.   10.1121/1.1753292   AbstractWebsite

Wave-theoretic ocean acoustic propagation modeling is combined with the peak arrival approach for tomographic travel-time observables to derive the sensitivity kernel of travel times with respect to sound-speed variations. This is the Born-Frechet kernel relating the three-dimensional spatial distribution of sound-speed variations with the induced travel-time variations. The derivation is based on the first Born approximation of the Green's function. The application of the travel-time sensitivity kernel to an ocean acoustic waveguide gives a picture close to the ray-theoretic one in the case of high frequencies. However, in the low-frequency case, of interest in ocean acoustic tomography, for example, there are significant deviations. Low-frequency travel times are sensitive to sound-speed changes in Fresnel-zone-scale areas surrounding the eigenrays, but not on the eigenrays themselves, where the sensitivity is zero. Further, there are areas of positive sensitivity, where, e.g., a sound-speed increase results in an increase of arrival times, i.e., a further delay of arrivals, in contrast with the common expectation. These findings are confirmed by forward acoustic predictions from a coupled-mode code. (C) 2004 Acoustical Society of America.

2001
Tiemann, CO, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD.  2001.  Acoustic scattering by internal solitary waves in the Strait of Gibraltar. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 109:143-154.   10.1121/1.1329624   AbstractWebsite

High-freqnency underwater acoustic transmissions across the Strait of Gibraltar were used to examine acoustic scattering caused by the unique internal wave field in the Strait. Internal solitary waves of 100 m in amplitude propagate along the interface between an upper layer of Atlantic water and a lower layer of Mediterranean water. The interface is also strongly modulated by internal tides of comparable amplitude. As internal solitary waves cross the acoustic path, they cause sharp soundspeed gradients which intermittently refract acoustic rays away from normal sound channels. Internal tides vertically shift soundspeed profiles for additional travel time variability. Although the acoustic scattering is quite complicated, it is also surprisingly robust, making it a good candidate for modeling. Key features of the acoustic arrival pattern can be accounted for in some detail by a model description of the complex hydraulics in the Strait. (C) 2001 Acoustical Society of America. [DOI: 10.1121/1.1329624].

1994
Worcester, PF, Cornuelle BD, Hildebrand JA, Hodgkiss WS, Duda TF, Boyd J, Howe BM, Mercer JA, Spindel RC.  1994.  A Comparison of Measured and Predicted Broad-Band Acoustic Arrival Patterns in Travel Time-Depth Coordinates at 1000-Km Range. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 95:3118-3128.   10.1121/1.409977   AbstractWebsite

Broadband acoustic signals were transmitted from a moored 250-Hz source to a 3-km-long vertical line array of hydrophones 1000 km distant in the eastern North Pacific Ocean during July 1989. The sound-speed field along the great circle path connecting the source and receiver was measured directly by nearly 300 expendable bathythermograph (XBT), conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD), and air-launched expendable bathythermograph (AXBT) casts while the transmissions were in progress. This experiment is unique in combining a vertical receiving array that extends over much of the water column, extensive concurrent environmental measurements, and broadband signals designed to measure acoustic travel times with 1-ms precision. The time-mean travel times of the early raylike arrivals, which are evident as wave fronts sweeping across the receiving array, and the time-mean of the times at which the acoustic reception ends (the final cutoffs) for hydrophones near the sound channel axis, are consistent with ray predictions based on the direct measurements of temperature and salinity, within measurement uncertainty. The comparisons show that subinertial oceanic variability with horizontal wavelengths shorter than 50 km, which is not resolved by the direct measurements, significantly (25 ms peak-to-peak) affects the time-mean ray travel times. The final cutoffs occur significantly later than predicted using ray theory for hydrophones more than 100-200 m off the sound channel axis. Nongeometric effects, such as diffraction at caustics, partially account for this observation.

1993
Cornuelle, BD, Worcester PF, Hildebrand JA, Hodgkiss WS, Duda TF, Boyd J, Howe BM, Mercer JA, Spindel RC.  1993.  Ocean Acoustic Tomography at 1000-Km Range Using Wave-Fronts Measured with a Large-Aperture Vertical Array. Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans. 98:16365-16377.   10.1029/93jc01246   AbstractWebsite

Broadband acoustic signals transmitted from a moored 250-Hz source to a 3-km-long vertical line array of hydrophones 1000 km distant in the north central Pacific Ocean were used to determine the amount of information available from tomographic techniques used in the vertical plane connecting a source-receiver pair. A range-independent, pure acoustic inverse to obtain the sound speed field using travel time data from the array is shown to be possible by iterating from climatological data without using any information from concurrent environmental measurements. Range-dependent inversions indicate resolution of components of oceanic variability with horizontal wavelengths shorter than 50 km, although the limited spatial resolution of concurrent direct measurements does not provide a strong cross-validation, since the typical cast spacing of 20-25 km gives a Nyquist wavelength of 40-50 km. The small travel time signals associated with high-wavenumber ocean variability place stringent but achievable requirements on travel time measurement precision. The forward problem for the high-wavenumber components of the model is found to be subject to relatively large linearization errors, however, unless the sound speed field at wavelengths greater than about 50 km is known from other measurements or from a two-dimensional tomographic array. The high-ocean-wavenumber resolution that is in principle available from tomographic measurements is therefore achievable only under restricted conditions.

Dushaw, BD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM.  1993.  On Equations for the Speed of Sound in Seawater. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 93:255-275.   10.1121/1.405660   AbstractWebsite

Long-range acoustic transmissions made in conjunction with extensive environmental measurements and accurate mooring position determinations have been used to test the accuracy of equations used to calculate sound speed from pressure, temperature, and salinity. The sound-speed fields computed using the Del Grosso equation [ V. A. Del Grosso, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 56, 1084-1091 (1974)] give predictions of acoustic arrival patterns which agree significantly better with the long-range measurements than those computed using the Chen and Millero equation [ C. Chen and F. J. Millero, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62, 1129-1135 (1977) The predicted ray travel times and travel time error have been calculated using objectively mapped sound-speed fields computed from conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data. Using the measured and predicted ray travel times, a negligible correction to Del Grosso's equation of + 0.05 +/- 0.05 m/s at 4000-m depth is calculated.