Publications

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2015
Edwards, CA, Moore AM, Hoteit I, Cornuelle BD.  2015.  Regional ocean data assimilation. Annual Review of Marine Science, Vol 7. 7:21-42.   10.1146/annurev-marine-010814-015821   AbstractWebsite

This article reviews the past 15 years of developments in regional ocean data assimilation. A variety of scientific, management, and safety-related objectives motivate marine scientists to characterize many ocean environments, including coastal regions. As in weather prediction, the accurate representation of physical, chemical, and/or biological properties in the ocean is challenging. Models and observations alone provide imperfect representations of the ocean state, but together they can offer improved estimates. Variational and sequential methods are among the most widely used in regional ocean systems, and there have been exciting recent advances in ensemble and four-dimensional variational approaches. These techniques are increasingly being tested and adapted for biogeochemical applications.

2008
Muccino, JC, Arango HG, Bennett AF, Chua BS, Cornuelle BD, Di Lorenzo E, Egbert GD, Haidvogel D, Levin JC, Luo H, Miller AJ, Moore AA, Zaron ED.  2008.  The Inverse Ocean Modeling system. Part II: Applications. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. 25:1623-1637.   10.1175/2008jtecho522.1   AbstractWebsite

The Inverse Ocean Modeling (IOM) System is a modular system for constructing and running weak-constraint four-dimensional variational data assimilation (W4DVAR) for any linear or nonlinear functionally, smooth dynamical model and observing array. The IOM has been applied to four ocean models with widely varying characteristics. The Primitive Equations Z-coordinate-Harmonic Analysis of Tides (PEZ-HAT) and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) are three-dimensional, primitive equations models while the Advanced Circulation model in 2D (ADCIRC-2D) and Spectral Element Ocean Model in 2D (SEOM-2D) are shallow-water models belonging to the general finite-element family. These models. in conjunction with the IOM, have been used to investigate a wide variety of scientific phenomena including tidal. mesoscale, and wind-driven circulation. In all cases, the assimilation of data using the IOM provides a better estimate of the ocean state than the model alone.

2000
Pinkel, R, Munk W, Worcester P, Cornuelle BD, Rudnick D, Sherman J, Filloux JH, Dushaw BD, Howe BM, Sanford TB, Lee CM, Kunze E, Gregg MC, Miller JB, Merrifield MA, Luther DS, Firing E, Brainard R, Flament PJ, Chave AD, Moum JM, Caldwell DR, Levine MD, Boyd T, Egbert GD.  2000.  Ocean mixing studied near Hawaiian Ridge. Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union. 81:545-553.   10.1029/EO081i046p00545-02   AbstractWebsite

The Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) is a grassroots program to study turbulent mixing processes near the Hawaiian Ridge. The HOME is motivated by the desire to understand diffusive aspects of the advective-diffusive balance that mediates the general circulation of the oceans. HOME is focused on tidally driven mixing, given the ubiquity of the tide as a deep-sea energy source. As the sea surface cools at high latitude, surface waters sink. Subsidence rate is sufficient to fill the worlds ocean with cold bottom water in approximately 3,000 years. Diffusive processes that transfer heat into the abyssal ocean are required to maintain a steady-state thermal structure. An effective eddy diffusivity of order Kp=10āˆ’4 m2 sāˆ’1, 700 times the molecular diffusivity of heat, is necessary [Munk, 1966]. Such a diffusivity might be supported by either mechanical mixing (turbulent transport) or thermodynamic (so-called doubly diffusive) processes.

1997
Dushaw, BD, Egbert GD, Worcester PF, Cornuelle BD, Howe BM, Metzger K.  1997.  A TOPEX/POSEIDON global tidal model (TPXO.2) and barotropic tidal currents determined from long-range acoustic transmissions. Progress in Oceanography. 40:337-367.   10.1016/s0079-6611(98)00008-1   AbstractWebsite

Tidal currents derived from the TPXO.2 global tidal model of Egbert, Bennett, and Foreman are compared with those determined from long-range reciprocal acoustic transmissions. Amplitudes and phases of tidal constituents in the western North Atlantic are derived from acoustic data obtained in 1991-1992 using a pentagonal array of transceivers. Small, spatially coherent differences between the measured and modeled tidal harmonic constants mostly result from smoothing assumptions made in the model and errors caused in the model currents by complicated topography to the southwest of the acoustical array. Acoustically measured harmonic constants (amplitude, phase) of M-2 tidal vorticity (3-8 x 10(-9) s(-1), 210-310 degrees) agree with those derived from the TPXO.2 model (2-5 x 10(-9) s(-1), 250-300 degrees), whereas harmonic constants of about (1-2 x 10(-9) s(-1), 350-360 degrees) are theoretically expected from the equations of motion. Harmonic constants in the North Pacific Ocean are determined using acoustic data from a triangular transceiver array deployed in 1987. These constants are consistent with those given by the TPXO.2 tidal model within the uncertainties. Tidal current harmonic constants determined from current meters do not generally provide a critical test of tidal models. The tidal currents have been estimated to high accuracy using long-range reciprocal acoustic transmissions; these estimates will be useful constraints on future global tidal models. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.