Constraints on the shallow velocity structure of the Lucky Strike Volcano, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, from downward continued multichannel streamer data

Citation:
Arnulf, AF, Harding AJ, Kent GM, Singh SC, Crawford WC.  2014.  Constraints on the shallow velocity structure of the Lucky Strike Volcano, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, from downward continued multichannel streamer data. Journal of Geophysical Research-Solid Earth. 119:1119-1144.

Date Published:

2014/02

Keywords:

activity, crustal magma chamber, de-fuca, downward continuation, East Pacific Rise, emplacement processes, gravity-anomalies, hydrothermal, layer 2a, Lucky Strike, mid-atlantic ridge, oceanic core complex, oceanic crust, ridge, seismic refraction, seismic structure, thermal structure, tomography

Abstract:

The shallow velocity structure of the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is investigated using seismic refraction and reflection techniques applied to downward continued multichannel streamer data. We present a three-dimensional velocity model beneath the Lucky Strike Volcano with unprecedented spatial resolutions of a few hundred meters. These new constraints reveal large lateral variations in P wave velocity structure beneath this feature. Throughout the study area, uppermost crustal velocities are significantly lower than those inferred from lower resolution ocean bottom seismometer studies, with the lowest values (1.8-2.2km/s) found beneath the three central volcanic cones. Within the central volcano, distinct shallow units are mapped that likely represent a systematic process such as burial of older altered surfaces. We infer that the entire upper part of the central volcano is young relative to the underlying median valley floor and that there has been little increase in the layer 2A velocities since emplacement. Layer 2A thins significantly across the axial valley bounding faults likely as the result of footwall uplift. The upper crustal velocities increase with age, on average, at a rate of similar to 0.875km/s/Myr, similar to previous measurements at fast-spreading ridges, suggesting hydrothermal sealing of small-scale porosity is progressing at normal to enhanced rates.

Notes:

n/a

Website

DOI:

10.1002/2013jb010500