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2000
Gershunov, A, Barnett TP, Cayan DR, Tubbs T, Goddard L.  2000.  Predicting and downscaling ENSO impacts on intraseasonal precipitation statistics in California: The 1997/98 event. Journal of Hydrometeorology. 1:201-210.   10.1175/1525-7541(2000)001<0201:padeio>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Three long-range forecasting methods have been evaluated for prediction and downscaling of seasonal and intraseasonal precipitation statistics in California. Full-statistical, hybrid-dynamical-statistical and full-dynamical approaches have been used to forecast Fl Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related total precipitation, daily precipitation frequency, and average intensity anomalies during the January-March season. For El Nino winters, the hybrid approach emerges as the best performer, while La Nina forecasting skill is poor. The full-statistical forecasting method features reasonable forecasting skill for both La Nina and El Nino winters. The performance of the full-dynamical approach could not be evaluated as rigorously as that of the other two forecasting schemes. Although the full-dynamical forecasting approach is expected to outperform simpler forecasting schemes in the long run, evidence is presented to conclude that, at present, the full-dynamical forecasting approach is the least viable of the three, at least in California. The authors suggest that operational forecasting of any intraseasonal temperature, precipitation, or streamflow statistic derivable from the available-records is possible now for ENSO-extreme years.

1999
Gershunov, A, Barnett T, Cayan D.  1999.  North Pacific interdecadal oscillation seen as factor in ENSO-related North American climate anomalies. EOS Trans. AGU. 80:25-30.   10.1029/99EO00019   Abstract

The North Pacific Oscillation (NPO) may be a significant factor in how El Niño and La Niña affect North American weather. A cold NPO phase indeed may have been partially responsible for the uncommon strength and stability of the El Niño-induced North American climate anomalies of early 1998. On the other hand, the latest La Niña excursion, if NPO persists in its cold phase, would likely produce weaker, less stable, and less predictable climate anomalies.It is well known that the effects of interannual tropical forcing, or El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences, penetrate into middle latitudes to produce particular forms of climate anomalies, such as the relatively well-predicted temperature and precipitation patterns over North America during the great El Niño of 1997–1998. Evidence is now mounting that this ENSO effect accentuates certain types of synoptic scale events, so that the likelihood of extreme events is biased above or below its climatological normal over broad regions. Observations show that these ENSO effects over the United States are also affected by the phases of decadal-scale climate states such as the North Pacific Oscillation (NPO).The NPO influence can be seen in both the seasonal aggregate of various ENSO patterns and the distribution of extreme daily events.

1998
Gershunov, A, Michaelsen J, Gautier C.  1998.  Large-scale coupling between the tropical greenhouse effect and latent heat flux via atmospheric dynamics. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 103:6017-6031.   10.1029/97jd03520   AbstractWebsite

The clear-sky greenhouse effect (GE) is determined primarily by the amount and vertical distribution of water vapor in the atmospheric column. GE hampers surface radiative cooling and is maintained through surface evaporative cooling. This paper examines the intimate space-time relationships between the patterns of radiative heating of the atmosphere and sui-face evaporative cooling. We use data derived from satellite and in situ observations to show that tropical maritime GE is decoupled in space and time from latent heat flux (LHF), its source of water vapor. Large scale transport of atmospheric water vapor responsible for the observed relationships between GE and LHF is discussed. The spatial patterns of average GE and LHF are imbedded in the Walker and Hadley circulations and reinforce these circulations with strong evaporative cooling in the subtropical highs and greenhouse warning in the equatorial trough zones. Throughout tropical areas characterized by strong seasonality, the seasonal cycles of GE and LHF are out of phase. Much of the moisture that feeds GE in these off equatorial regions is advected by the Hadley circulation from tropical moisture Source regions of the opposite hemisphere. An out-of-phase relationship between GE and LHF also turns up on El Nino-Southern Oscillation timescales, most notably in the central tropical Pacific. The "super" greenhouse effect (SGE), a situation when GE absorption increases more than colocated surface longwave emission, is a seasonal feature of extensive tropical off-equatorial areas where it is maintained by moisture convergence and convection. On interannual timescales, the same dynamical processes appear to assert the SGE in the central equatorial Pacific. GE and LHF regimes are also described for the equatorial cold tongue and warm pool regions.

Gershunov, A, Barnett TP.  1998.  ENSO influence on intraseasonal extreme rainfall and temperature frequencies in the contiguous United States: Observations and model results. Journal of Climate. 11:1575-1586.   10.1175/1520-0442(1998)011<1575:eioier>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

The signature of ENSO in the wintertime frequencies of heavy precipitation and temperature extremes is derived from both observations and atmospheric general circulation model output for the contiguous United States. ENSO signals in the frequency of occurrence of heavy rainfall are found in the Southeast, Gulf Coast, central Rockies, and the general area of the Mississippi-Ohio River valleys. Strong, nonlinear signals in extreme warm temperature frequencies are found in the southern and eastern United States. Extreme cold temperature frequencies are found to be less sensitive to ENSO forcing than extreme warm temperature frequencies. Observed ENSO signals in extreme temperature frequencies are not simply manifestations of shifts in mean seasonal temperature. These signals in the wintertime frequency of extreme rainfall and temperature events appear strong enough to be useful in long-range regional statistical prediction. Comparisons of observational and model results show that the model climate is sensitive to ENSO on continental scales and provide some encouragement to modeling studies of intraseasonal sensitivity to low-frequency climatic forcing. However, large regional disagreements exist in all variables. Continental-scale El Nino signatures in intraseasonal temperature variability are not correctly modeled. Modeled signals in extreme temperature event frequencies are much more directly related to shifts in seasonal mean temperature than they are in nature.

Gershunov, A.  1998.  ENSO influence on intraseasonal extreme rainfall and temperature frequencies in the contiguous United States: Implications for long-range predictability. Journal of Climate. 11:3192-3203.   10.1175/1520-0442(1998)011<3192:eioier>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Potential ENSO-related predictability of wintertime daily extreme precipitation and temperature frequencies is investigated. This is done empirically using six decades of daily data at 168 stations distributed over the contiguous United States. ENSO sensitivity in the extreme ranges of intraseasonal precipitation and temperature probability density functions is demonstrated via a compositing technique. Potential predictability of extremes is then investigated with a simple statistical model. Given a perfect forecast of ENSO, the frequency of intraseasonal extremes is specified as the average frequency of occurrence during similar-phased ENSO winters on record. Specification skill is assessed as the cross-validated proportion of local variance explained by this method. The skill depends on varying ENSO sensitivity in different geographic regions and quantile ranges and on consistency or variability from one like-phased ENSO event to another. ENSO sensitivity also varies according to the intensity of the tropical forcing; however, not always in the expected sense. Good predictability is likely for variables and in regions displaying a strong and consistent ENSO signal. This is found in some coherent regions of the United States for various combinations of frequency variable and ENSO phase. ENSO-based predictability of heavy and extreme precipitation frequency is potentially good along the Gulf Coast, central plains, Southwest, and in the Ohio River valley for El Nino winters and in the Southwest and Florida for La Nina winters. Not all large magnitude signals translate into significant specification skill. Extreme precipitation frequency in the Southwest is a good example of this. Extreme warm temperature frequency (EWF) is potentially predictable in the southern and eastern United States during Fl Nino winters and in the Midwest during the strongest events. La Nina winters exhibit potentially very good EWF predictability in a Large area of the southern United States centered on Texas. Despite showing coherent ENSO patterns, extreme cold temperature frequency (ECF) signals are mostly weak and inconsistent, especially during strong ENSO events. Curiously, specification skill improves in the northern United States, along the West Coast and in the southeast during weaker El Nino winters. An improvement in potential ECF predictability is also observed in the Midwest during weaker La Nina winters.

Gershunov, A, Barnett TP.  1998.  Interdecadal modulation of ENSO teleconnections. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 79:2715-2725.   10.1175/1520-0477(1998)079<2715:imoet>2.0.co;2   AbstractWebsite

Seasonal climate anomalies over North America exhibit rather large variability between years characterized by the same ENSO phase. This lack of consistency reduces potential statistically based ENSO-related climate predictability. The authors show that the North Pacific oscillation (NPO) exerts a modulating effect on ENSO teleconnections. Sea lever pressure (SLP) data over the North Pacific, North America, and the North Atlantic and daily rainfall records in the contiguous United States are used to demonstrate that typical ENSO signals tend to be stronger and more stable during preferred phases of the NPO. Typical El Nino patterns (e.g., low pressure over the northeastern Pacific, dry northwest, and wet southwest, etc.) are strong and consistent only during the high phase of the NPO, which is associated with an anomalously cold northwestern Pacific. The generally reversed SLP and precipitation patterns during La Nina winters are consistent only during the low NPO phase. Climatic anomalies tend to be weak and spatially incoherent during low NPO-El Nino and high NPO-La Nina winters. These results suggest that confidence in ENSO-based long-range climate forecasts for North America should reflect interdecadal climatic anomalies in the North Pacific.

1996
Gershunov, A, Michaelsen J.  1996.  Climatic-scale space-time variability of tropical precipitation. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres. 101:26297-26307.   10.1029/96jd01382   AbstractWebsite

More than 15 years of monthly microwave sounding unit rainfall data over the tropical oceans are analyzed to illustrate rainfall variability on various timescales and delineate its spatial patterns. The annual and semiannual components of the seasonal cycle are modeled with first and second annual harmonics at every 2.5 degrees x 2.5 degrees grid square. Regions of highest rainfall variability tend to be characterized by a powerful annual cycle. The semiannual cycle is generally a trivial component of the seasonal cycle, except in some regions where either the mean climatological precipitation is low or where the total seasonal cycle is weak. An interesting exception, in this respect, is a band of the southeastern tropical Pacific extending immediately to the south of the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue. Regions of highest climatological mean rainfall are characterized by weak seasonality but strong nonseasonal variability. After seasonality is described and removed from the data, nonseasonal variability is considered via principal component analysis in the time domain. The two dominant modes together describe precipitation variability associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation: they outline the evolution of warm- and cold-event precipitation anomalies and contrast the intense 1982-1983 warm event with the moderate events of 1986-1987 and 1992-1993. These two modes display oscillations with predominantly quasi-biennial and similar to 5-year periods. Another coherent mode summarizes intraseasonal variability which, although inadequately resolved by the monthly average rainfall data, displays typical signs of the 40- to 50-day oscillation. All coherent modes, despite having much of their energy concentrated around rather different frequencies, show signs of interaction.

Gershunov, A, Michaelsen J.  1996.  Vertical variability of water vapor in the midlatitude upper troposphere. Contributions to Atmospheric Physics [Beitraege zur Physik der Atmosphaere.], Wiesbaden, Germany. 69:205-214. AbstractWebsite

Radiative, dynamical and phase-change considerations of tropospheric moisture, all point to moisture in the upper troposphere as a major determinant of the global climate. Hemispheric-scale vertical variability of upper-tropospheric moisture is observed through a multivariate statistical analysis of three years of monthly mean SAGE-II data for 1986-88. Midlatitude zonally averaged vertical variability of moisture in the upper troposphere is separated into coherent modes using principal components analysis. Bulk vertical variations in the upper troposphere are separated from a dynamical mode of variability representing vertical moisture gradient and horizontal advection. The procedure is repeated for the northern and southern midlatitudes. We discuss the vertical structure and temporal variability of the meaningful modes and observe a north-south hemispheric asymmetry in the characteristics of the vertical moisture variability. It is hypothesized that midlatitude wave cyclones are responsible for the poleward and vertical transport of water vapor to and in the midlatitude upper troposphere.