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Panorska, AK, Gershunov A, Kozubowski TJ.  2007.  From diversity to volatility: probability of daily precipitation extremes. Nonlinear Dynamics in Geosciences. ( Tsonis AA, Elsner JB, Eds.).:465-484.: Springer New York   10.1007/978-0-387-34918-3_26   Abstract

A sensible stochastic model is required to correctly estimate the risk associated with daily precipitation extremes. The same requirement holds for studying high-frequency precipitation extremes in the context of climate variability and change. Results derived from probability theory were used to develop an efficient automated scheme to distinguish between heavy and exponential precipitation probability density function (PDF) tails in hundreds of daily station records spanning five decades over the North American continent. These results suggest that, at a vast majority of the stations, daily extreme precipitation probabilities do not decay exponentially, but more closely follow a power law. This means that statistical distributions traditionally used to model daily rainfall (e.g. exponential, Weibull, Gamma, lognormal) generally underestimate the probabilities of extremes. The degree of this distortion, i.e. volatility, depends on regional and seasonal climatic peculiarities. By examining geographical and seasonal patterns in extreme precipitation behavior, the authors show that the degree of volatility is determined regionally by the diversity in precipitation-producing mechanisms, or storm type diversity. Exponential tails are geographically limited to regions where precipitation falls almost exclusively from similar meteorological systems and where light probability tails are observed in all seasons. Topography plays an important role in flattening or fattening PDF tails by limiting the spatial extent of certain systems while orographically altering their precipitation amounts. Results presented here represent the first logical step towards choosing appropriate PDFs at various locations by specifying their regionally relevant family. Heavy tailed models are generally superior to those from the exponential family and can lead to more realistic estimates of extreme event probabilities, return periods, n-year events, and design limits. The correct choice of PDF is essential to safe engineering design, hazard assessment and other applications, as well as for fostering further investigations of hydrologic weather extremes and climate.

Polade, SD, Gershunov A, Cayan DR, Dettinger MD, Pierce DW.  2013.  Natural climate variability and teleconnections to precipitation over the Pacific-North American region in CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. Geophysical Research Letters. 40:2296-2301.   10.1002/grl.50491   AbstractWebsite

Natural climate variability will continue to be an important aspect of future regional climate even in the midst of long-term secular changes. Consequently, the ability of climate models to simulate major natural modes of variability and their teleconnections provides important context for the interpretation and use of climate change projections. Comparisons reported here indicate that the CMIP5 generation of global climate models shows significant improvements in simulations of key Pacific climate mode and their teleconnections to North America compared to earlier CMIP3 simulations. The performance of 14 models with simulations in both the CMIP3 and CMIP5 archives are assessed using singular value decomposition analysis of simulated and observed winter Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and concurrent precipitation over the contiguous United States and northwestern Mexico. Most of the models reproduce basic features of the key natural mode and their teleconnections, albeit with notable regional deviations from observations in both SST and precipitation. Increasing horizontal resolution in the CMIP5 simulations is an important, but not a necessary, factor in the improvement from CMIP3 to CMIP5.

Polade, SD, Pierce DW, Cayan DR, Gershunov A, Dettinger MD.  2014.  The key role of dry days in changing regional climate and precipitation regimes. Scientific Reports. 4   10.1038/srep04364   AbstractWebsite

Future changes in the number of dry days per year can either reinforce or counteract projected increases in daily precipitation intensity as the climate warms. We analyze climate model projected changes in the number of dry days using 28 coupled global climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, version 5 (CMIP5). We find that the Mediterranean Sea region, parts of Central and South America, and western Indonesia could experience up to 30 more dry days per year by the end of this century. We illustrate how changes in the number of dry days and the precipitation intensity on precipitating days combine to produce changes in annual precipitation, and show that over much of the subtropics the change in number of dry days dominates the annual changes in precipitation and accounts for a large part of the change in interannual precipitation variability.

Polade, SD, Gershunov A, Cayan DR, Dettinger MD, Pierce DW.  2017.  Precipitation in a warming world: Assessing projected hydro-climate changes in California and other Mediterranean climate regions. Scientific Reports. 7   10.1038/s41598-017-11285-y   AbstractWebsite

In most Mediterranean climate (MedClim) regions around the world, global climate models (GCMs) consistently project drier futures. In California, however, projections of changes in annual precipitation are inconsistent. Analysis of daily precipitation in 30 GCMs reveals patterns in projected hydrometeorology over each of the five MedClm regions globally and helps disentangle their causes. MedClim regions, except California, are expected to dry via decreased frequency of winter precipitation. Frequencies of extreme precipitation, however, are projected to increase over the two MedClim regions of the Northern Hemisphere where projected warming is strongest. The increase in heavy and extreme precipitation is particularly robust over California, where it is only partially offset by projected decreases in low-medium intensity precipitation. Over the Mediterranean Basin, however, losses from decreasing frequency of low-medium-intensity precipitation are projected to dominate gains from intensifying projected extreme precipitation. MedClim regions are projected to become more sub-tropical, i.e. made dryer via pole-ward expanding subtropical subsidence. California's more nuanced hydrological future reflects a precarious balance between the expanding subtropical high from the south and the south-eastward extending Aleutian low from the north-west. These dynamical mechanisms and thermodynamic moistening of the warming atmosphere result in increased horizontal water vapor transport, bolstering extreme precipitation events.