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Regnier, P, Friedlingstein P, Ciais P, Mackenzie FT, Gruber N, Janssens IA, Laruelle GG, Lauerwald R, Luyssaert S, Andersson AJ, Arndt S, Arnosti C, Borges AV, Dale AW, Gallego-Sala A, Godderis Y, Goossens N, Hartmann J, Heinze C, Ilyina T, Joos F, LaRowe DE, Leifeld J, Meysman FJR, Munhoven G, Raymond PA, Spahni R, Suntharalingam P, Thullner M.  2013.  Anthropogenic perturbation of the carbon fluxes from land to ocean. Nature Geoscience. 6:597-607.   10.1038/ngeo1830   AbstractWebsite

A substantial amount of the atmospheric carbon taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally along the aquatic continuum from upland terrestrial ecosystems to the ocean. So far, global carbon budget estimates have implicitly assumed that the transformation and lateral transport of carbon along this aquatic continuum has remained unchanged since pre-industrial times. A synthesis of published work reveals the magnitude of present-day lateral carbon fluxes from land to ocean, and the extent to which human activities have altered these fluxes. We show that anthropogenic perturbation may have increased the flux of carbon to inland waters by as much as 1.0 Pg C yr(-1) since pre-industrial times, mainly owing to enhanced carbon export from soils. Most of this additional carbon input to upstream rivers is either emitted back to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide (similar to 0.4 Pg C yr(-1)) or sequestered in sediments (similar to 0.5 Pg C yr(-1)) along the continuum of freshwater bodies, estuaries and coastal waters, leaving only a perturbation carbon input of similar to 0.1 Pg C yr(-1) to the open ocean. According to our analysis, terrestrial ecosystems store similar to 0.9 Pg C yr(-1) at present, which is in agreement with results from forest inventories but significantly differs from the figure of 1.5 Pg C yr(-1) previously estimated when ignoring changes in lateral carbon fluxes. We suggest that carbon fluxes along the land-ocean aquatic continuum need to be included in global carbon dioxide budgets.

Kuffner, IB, Jokiel PL, Rodgers KS, Andersson AJ, Mackenzie FT.  2012.  An apparent "vital effect" of calcification rate on the Sr/Ca temperature proxy in the reef coral Montipora capitata. Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems. 13   10.1029/2012gc004128   AbstractWebsite

Measuring the strontium to calcium ratio in coral skeletons reveals information on seawater temperatures during skeletal deposition, but studies have shown additional variables may affect the ratio. Here we measured Sr/Ca in the reef coral Montipora capitata grown in six mesocosms continuously supplied with seawater from the adjacent reef flat. Three mesocosms were ambient controls, and three had seawater chemistry simulating "ocean acidification" (OA). We found that Sr/Ca was not affected by the OA treatment and neither was coral calcification for these small colonies (larger colonies did show an OA effect). The lack of OA effects allowed us to test the hypothesis that coral growth rate can affect Sr/Ca using the natural range in calcification rates of the corals grown at the same temperature. We found that Sr/Ca was inversely related to calcification rate (Sr/Ca = 9.385 - 0.0040 (calcification rate)). Using a previously published calibration curve for this species, a 22 mg d(-1) colony(-1) increase in calcification rate introduced a 1 degrees C warmer temperature estimate, with the 27 corals reporting "temperatures" ranging from 24.9 to 28.9 degrees C, with mean 26.6 +/- 0.9 degrees C standard deviation. Our results lend support to hypotheses invoking kinetic processes and growth rate to explain vital effects on Sr/Ca. However, uncertainty in the slope of the regression of Sr/Ca on calcification and a low R-squared value lead us to conclude that Sr/Ca could still be a useful proxy in this species given sufficient replication or by including growth rate in the calibration.

Sutton, AJ, Feely RA, Maenner-Jones S, Musielwicz S, Osborne J, Dietrich C, Monacci N, Cross J, Bott R, Kozyr A, Andersson AJ, Bates NR, Cai WJ, Cronin MF, DeCarlo EH, Hales B, Howden SD, Lee CM, Manzello DP, McPhaden MJ, Melendez M, Mickett JB, Newton JA, Noakes SE, Noh JH, Olafsdottir SR, Salisbury JE, Send U, Trull TW, Vandemark DC, Weller RA.  2019.  Autonomous seawater pCO(2) and pH time series from 40 surface buoys and the emergence of anthropogenic trends. Earth System Science Data. 11:421-439.   10.5194/essd-11-421-2019   AbstractWebsite

Ship-based time series, some now approaching over 3 decades long, are critical climate records that have dramatically improved our ability to characterize natural and anthropogenic drivers of ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake and biogeochemical processes. Advancements in autonomous marine carbon sensors and technologies over the last 2 decades have led to the expansion of observations at fixed time series sites, thereby improving the capability of characterizing sub-seasonal variability in the ocean. Here, we present a data product of 40 individual autonomous moored surface ocean pCO(2) (partial pressure of CO2) time series established between 2004 and 2013, 17 also include autonomous pH measurements. These time series characterize a wide range of surface ocean carbonate conditions in different oceanic (17 sites), coastal (13 sites), and coral reef (10 sites) regimes. A time of trend emergence (ToE) methodology applied to the time series that exhibit well-constrained daily to interannual variability and an estimate of decadal variability indicates that the length of sustained observations necessary to detect statistically significant anthropogenic trends varies by marine environment. The ToE estimates for seawater pCO(2) and pH range from 8 to 15 years at the open ocean sites, 16 to 41 years at the coastal sites, and 9 to 22 years at the coral reef sites. Only two open ocean pCO(2) time series, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station (WHOTS) in the subtropical North Pacific and Stratus in the South Pacific gyre, have been deployed longer than the estimated trend detection time and, for these, deseasoned monthly means show estimated anthropogenic trends of 1.9 +/- 0.3 and 1.6 +/- 0.3 mu atm yr(-1), respectively. In the future, it is possible that updates to this product will allow for the estimation of anthropogenic trends at more sites; however, the product currently provides a valuable tool in an accessible format for evaluating climatology and natural variability of surface ocean carbonate chemistry in a variety of regions. Data are available at https.//doi. org/10.7289/V5DB8043 and https.//www.nodc.noaa.gov/ocads/oceans/Moorings/ndp097.html (Sutton et al., 2018).